21

"I would think there would be more." More than 362 individual authors? Most people, when they come across the site, fail to notice the little check box at the top right corner of the page (under the name of the site), so it looks substantially less. If you did see that and wanted more, keep in mind, as brianpck mentioned, this doesn't include ...


8

Note the exact wording: This website contains essentially all Latin literary texts written before A.D. 200 Emphasis mine. The PHI corpus is focused on literature, and does truly include essentially all Latin literature from that time period—but omits inscriptions, graffiti, and so on. The "essentially" reflects some uncertainty in what should be ...


6

In case it helps someone figure this out, here are the authors in numerical order. This is a sorted version of the list of authors. The years indicate when the person lived. When unsure, it gives known dates of consulship or other activities. In some cases the name given in the list is not unique enough to identify the person, and I may have misidentified ...


1

You generally do not need to cite the edition of a Latin text that's standardized. Lucretius 1.1 is Lucretius 1.1 no matter whom you're reading, so unless you're citing something for its textual variation, just cite Lucretius himself: Lucr. 1.1. If you're citing a particular edition, place the name of the editor after citation. If the work is discussed, put ...


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