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The most famous passage where Plato treats of this is in the Theaetetus, 155c-d, which is a dialog about the nature of knowledge. At one point, we have the following interchange between Socrates and Theaetetus: Θεαίτητος καὶ νὴ τοὺς θεούς γε, ὦ Σώκρατες, ὑπερφυῶς ὡς θαυμάζω τί ποτ᾽ ἐστὶ ταῦτα, καὶ ἐνίοτε ὡς ἀληθῶς βλέπων εἰς αὐτὰ σκοτοδινιῶ. ...


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The graphs below are taken from "Borrowed Words, A History of Loanwords in English" by Philip Durkin (2014), as suggested by Alex B. Around 13,000 words out of 92,500 (the most frequent entries in the third edition of the OED, OED3) are derived only from Latin with around 2,000 which are from French and/or Latin (uncertain etymology). Interestingly, most ...


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Nihilānus is more correct: all of these words are formed using the stem, not the full word for the first half, so you get mont-ānus (stem mont-) rather than *mons-ānus. And the stem for both nihil and nihilum is just plain nihil. However, this word feels a little weird to me. Nihil is a strange beast in Latin: it's only commonly seen in a few cases, and is ...


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I haven't been able to find Ancient or Classical quotations: You mention "Hope of a better Age." Spes Melioris Aevi is the Motto of Rees in heraldry from the time of Richard I 'Lionheart.' And Spes Melioris Vitae 'Hope of a Better Life,' the Motto of the Broughtons. "Herald of a better age" "Forerunner of a better Age" occurs in an inscription ...


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