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A laryngeal following a vowel disappears (after colouring that vowel if it's *e), lengthening that vowel. This process is most prominent within roots, since ablaut means *e ends up next a laryngeal especially frequently, but it happens across morpheme boundaries within a word as well. In this case, the *h₃ at the start of *-h₃kʷós lenghtened the *i at the ...


8

The following is from Loan-words in Latin (1888) by Edward R. Wharton. He counted a total of 16,900 words from the following authors: Plautus, Terence, Cicero Caesar, Catullus, Lucretius, Sallust, Vergil, Horace, Livy, Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid, Persius, Tacitus, Juvenal. Out of that total, he classified 92.43% of the words as natively Latin, and the ...


4

Latinitium has a large selection of Latin recitations -about 100- mostly classical but covers other eras too, freely available at https://www.latinitium.com/latin-audio-archive . This is probably the closest to having a sort of unified 'archive' of all types of Latin recordings/recitations. Luke Ranieri's audio section (https://lukeranieri.com/audio/) is ...


4

-very brief and disorganized notes (not a full answer), maybe someone else will be willing to write a more coherent answer- Weiss 2020: 527 "Primary stress on the initial syllable is inferred on the basis of the syncope that affects medial syllables" also see Lindsay 1894 pp. 157-160 (e.g. word-initial stress in facilius and mulierem in the plays ...


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