16 votes

Gen. 1:20 is reptile ablative?

Jerome probably prefers to stick to the original Hebrew that uses the singulars both for "reptile"(*) and volatile which are grammatically adjectives but used here as substantives. ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11k
15 votes

Translating "Nocte volat caelī mediō"

As an adjective, indeed, medius, -a, -um does not take a genitive. However, there is a noun, the substantive medium, -i, which also means "middle" or "midst." Referring to a ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
14 votes

Is there a Latin word for 225th anniversary?

"Bicentennial" is not actually Latin; it's just English. It doesn't even come from a Latin word. In particular, bicentennial is an Americanism, and the more common word in England was (is ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
13 votes
Accepted

Are "sex" and "sexus" etymologically related?

The gist of Au101's answer is confirmed by de Vaan's Etymological Dictionary. First, regarding sex, in Proto-Italic and Proto-Indo-European, he gives: PIt. *seks 'six', *seks-to- 'sixth' PIE *(s)...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar
13 votes
Accepted

Concrete 4th and 5th declension nouns

Manus "hand" is of the fourth declension, though it is feminine. Specus "cave" is normally masculine. Lacus "lake". Fructus can be a fruit, one that you pick from a tree. ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 19.9k
12 votes
Accepted

Verbing in Latin

There are at least some cases in which this can be done, with different shades of meaning. graecisso (-izo), āre, v. n., = Γραικίζω, to imitate the Greeks, to adopt a Grecian manner or tone: atque ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.5k
12 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

Another partial answer. Tl;dr: kissing had a social role in Judaism that was inherited into Christianity (as osculum in the Vulgate), where it even had/acquired a ceremonial role (not sure if this ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.4k
12 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

I cannot provide a complete answer either, but perhaps a few points one the subject of kissing, and the semantics of the words for it. I cannot, unfortunately, provide immediate literature references ...
kkm -still wary of SE promises's user avatar
11 votes

Are "sex" and "sexus" etymologically related?

No, I don't think so, and for this I can actually rely on etymonline which is a fine resource, even if linguistics students are discouraged from using it for their homework. The entry for the English ...
Au101's user avatar
  • 323
11 votes
Accepted

Can infans refer to children who can speak?

In the Oxford Latin Dictionary (which only covers Classical Latin): An infant, little child (strictly, one not yet able to talk). The use of "strictly" in the parenthesis implies that even ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 1,021
11 votes
Accepted

Why did "cattus" replace Latin "feles"?

From the history of cats, it is clear that domesticated cats were introduced to the Romans from Egypt. Before that, the Romans had ferrets as mouse hunters. So the classical word feles refers to the ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Why is there no case agreement between "magni" and "poetae"?

There is agreement, in fact! Both of these words are masculine genitive singular. The trick is that poēta is a masculine noun, despite being in the first declension. So the genitive singular is -ae, ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.9k
11 votes

Gen. 1:20 is reptile ablative?

I understand the phrase producant aquae reptile animae viventis to mean something like "let the waters bring forth the creeping/crawling thing of living breath." In more idiomatic English, ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
  • 2,700
11 votes

Why does canis have both masculine and feminine forms?

Most Latin animal names have both a male and a female form, to express the animal's gender; the masculine is used when the gender is unknown. If the masculine form is second-declension (e.g. "...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 335
10 votes
Accepted

-eris, -oris, -uris?

The usual explanation given in historical grammars, e.g. those of Weiss, Sihler, and Buck, is that the -er- stems result from regular sound change, while the -or- stems result from analogical ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.3k
10 votes
Accepted

Are "vir" and "virgo" etymologically related?

The etymology of 'virgo' proposed by Ledo-Lemos, and rejected by Vaan (without further explanations), does not explain Lat. virgo as a compound from "*uiH-ro- (man) and *gʷén-eH₂- (woman)", ...
F.J. Ledo-Lemos's user avatar
10 votes

Are "vir" and "virgo" etymologically related?

Most likely not. According to de Vaan, there are two hypotheses on the etymology of virgo. virgo, -inis 'girl of marriageable age; virgin' [f. (m.) ri\ (Andr.-l·) Derivatives: virginalis 'of a ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
10 votes
Accepted

Nominalized adjective in Latin?

Latin doesn't need any changes at all. Since there are no definite articles, there's no need for anything but using the adjective substantively. The only requirement is following normal grammar rules ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
10 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

Here's counter-evidence for you, from Ovid Amores (2,5). inproba tum vero iungentes oscula vidi— illa mihi lingua nexa fuisse liquet— qualia non fratri tulerit germana severo, sed tulerit ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 11.7k
10 votes
Accepted

Do plural names referring to a singular thing require a plural verb?

Plural place names should have plural verbs. A very simple case of this is Athenae, -arum (Athens). Here's an illuminating example from Cicero: in quam cum intueor, maxime mihi occurrunt, Attice, ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.7k
10 votes

Noun adjuncts in Latin

The typical choice in Latin is to derive an adjective from the noun. I would translate "chicken soup" as ius gallinaceum. Deriving adjectives is nontrivial but inevitable. A genitive is a good second ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Latin suffixes in the noun "vertebra"?

There are two distinct words here: The noun vertebra. The adjective vertebralis, "related to vertebra". The adjective is derived from the noun, and both the noun and the adjective have ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

It's valid even in Classical Latin, in fact! Generally, it's fine to put two nouns together in the nominative (or, rather, in the same case) when one of them gives the general category of a thing and ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.9k
10 votes
Accepted

Is the dative plural of anima animis or animabus?

Both are correct, but there are limited use cases for -abus. The chief form used across all authors for all words ends in -is, as in anima, animis (fem. dat/abl. pl.). The only two general exceptions ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
10 votes
Accepted

Creating place names from Latin verbs?

Almost there, but the -t- belongs to the verb, not suffix. In particular, it's the fourth principle part (the supine/perfect participle) of the verb. For the verb: vomo, vomere, vomui, vomitus (or -...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
10 votes
Accepted

Is there a suffix that means "like", or "resembling"?

Despite verisimilis (which Lewis and Short note should be separated), I would instead recommend going the Greek route using -ειδής suffix. This means "in the shape or form of" and can be ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
10 votes

Is "levor" a Latin word?

I'm not sure why it's not on Wiktionary, but you can find it in Lewis and Short, with various references to classical usage. lēvor (laevor), ōris, m. id., I.smoothness: “haud sine principali aliquo ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66.9k
10 votes
Accepted

Should these "vellus" be "vellerum"?

Vellus is a neuter noun, and neuter nouns have the same form in both the nominative and accusative cases. The proper accusative singular of vellus is vellus. Vellerum, meanwhile, is the genitive ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
10 votes
Accepted

Which Latin declension do feminine nouns in -o (gen. in -us) belong to?

They don't really belong to any Latin declension; they're just the Greek forms taken over entirely unchanged. Looking at perhaps the most broadly attested name: Greek Latin sg . nom. Διδώ Dīdō gen. ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
  • 10.1k
9 votes
Accepted

Is 'Delphī' a second declension word?

It is indeed a second declension word. It is used in the plural. You can confirm this on the Lewis and Short dictionary: Delphi , orum, m., Δελφοί, I.the famous city of the oracle of Apollo in Phocis,...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k

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