Questions tagged [nominativus]

For questions about the nominative case.

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Double (identical) subject

What does one call a construction like; The father works as a physician. which becomes: Pater medicus laborat. Where we have multiple subjects. Now I now "medicus" would be the predicate ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Multiple singular nominatives as a collective subject

Can multiple singular things act as a collective subject? I am trying to understand the following expression from Horace: fama decus divitiis parent So, fama and decus are both singular nominatives. ...
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Verb + esse + predicate nominative

Pueri debent esse boni Habitus vero mediocritatis intelligitur esse liberatio hominis a dispositionibus subiectibilibus Why are boni and liberatio nominative? It seems to me that they ought to be ...
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4 votes
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Declension uncertainty regarding Ablative / Nominative

I'm struggling, particularly, with determining the correct case for some of the words in the following expressions: Natura est semper invicta Here, is the word "invicta" in Ablative or Nominative ...
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The Nominative Case Uses

Spinoza writes in the last passage of Ethics: Cum contra sapiens, quatenus ut talis consideratur, vix animo movetur, sed sui et Dei et rerum aeterna quadam necessitate conscius nunquam esse desinit,...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Nominativus cum infinitivo

Can somebody please tell me if my translation for the sentence: "It seems that the slave is carrying a letter." is correct? Videtur servus epistulam portare. videtur - 3rd person present passive ...
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4 answers
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Why use nominative in Coniugatio periphrastica passiva?

Why do we use the nominative case in this example: Liber legendus est. = The book needs to be read. If liber is a direct object, then why not put it in accusative?
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4 votes
3 answers
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When to use accusative and nominative?

I am having some difficulty figuring out the Latin translation for the following sentences: My favourite animal is a dog. Will dog (canis) be considered as nominative or accusative (canem)? I want a ...
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5 votes
2 answers
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Did Latin have any ergative verbs?

An "ergative verb" is a verb that can either take two nouns (a subject and an object) or only one (a subject), where the object of the two-noun form corresponds to the subject of the one-noun form. ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Can cases be replaced with prepositions + nominative?

Consider the word domus. Standard cases are domi, domo, domum, domo, domis. I wonder whether we could replace the above (and perhaps every single noun), with the "equivalent" preposition + nominative....
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4 answers
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Why nominative instead of accusative with verb "sum"?

Recently I've been learning about the accusative case, in/direct objects and in/transitive verbs. In light of this, consider the phrase: Nilus fluvius est I'm interested in the rationale (...
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6 votes
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Vicis - no singular nominative?

I read that vicis has no singular nominative, but it does have a plural one - vices. I find this very interesting, but hard to understand. It is like if the ontological configuration of space-time ...
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9 votes
1 answer
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Is the nominative gerund attested?

I'd always heard that the gerund had no nominative, with the present active infinitive taking the place of the missing form: volāre difficile est, rather than *volāndum. However, in the comments on ...
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12 votes
2 answers
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Why do we call a case a casus? And why rectus, obliquus?

I would translate the grammatical word casus (whence English case) as "a fall". And, indeed, the German word is Fall, Dutch naamval ("name fall"). Why is this word used for the grammatical function of ...
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12 votes
4 answers
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Is the complement of esse in nominative or accusative when esse is a subject?

Suppose I want to say something like "I like being a human". There are undoubtedly several ways to phrase that in Latin, but I want to do it so that it the subject is "to be a human". The complete ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Why is "Bonam Fortunam" the correct way to wish someone good fortune instead of "Bona Fortuna"?

I remember being told this by a Latin teacher, but I have since forgotten the details. Why should I use the accusative case instead of the nominative here?
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8 votes
1 answer
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In what case is "Venetiarum" in "Patriarchatus Venetiarum"?

Also, is it a noun or an adjective? What's the nominative? (moved second question here) Sorry, I'm a total n00b and checked all sorts of declension tables but I just can't figure this one out.
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