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Yes, it is Koine instead of modern Greek. You can tell by some of the additional marks around the letters: Koine Greek has breathing marks, while modern does not. Both rough and smooth breathing marks appear on the page. There are three different accent marks in Koine Greek, whereas modern has only one. All three variants appear on the page. There are ...


4

It's Koine Greek. Top right, second line you see the word οὗτος, it's not used in modern Greek. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0057:entry=ou(=tos


3

The ὅτι clause is explaining the participial clause governed by φανεροῦντι. How can it be that it is δι᾽ ἡμῶν that God is manifesting τὴν ὀσμὴν τῆς γνώσεως αὐτοῦ? In the sense that (ὅτι) Χριστοῦ εὐωδία ἐσμὲν...


2

There are numerous sites that have the koine text, includi g biblehub, which, when you click on gr for greek, will give several koine texts. There are also youtube channels that use Scrivener's textus receptus, which is in koine. The pronouciation is typically modern, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing. Frankly, the reconstructed pronunciation sounds ...


2

The notes in Nestle-Aland’s critical edition Novum Testamentum Graece et Latine make it clear (well, if you know that book’s footnote code...) that it is legitimate to suppose διὰ τοῦτο to be a later insertion, even if they don’t think so, and some old Greek texts did consider it part of the previous sentence. The text you are working with was edited by ...


2

Good question! Syntéleia is formed from the verb syn-teléō, which originally meant "to complete something". It was the verb for placing the final stone on a building, making the finishing touches on an artwork, or paying off the last part of a loan. Because of this last meaning, it also started to mean "to contribute to a fund", even if you weren't the one ...


1

διὰ τοῦτο in the Greek New Testament always occurs at the beginning of a clause, as can be seen from the results of this search. The τοῦτο can refer either backward, marking the previous clause as the reason for a statement, or forward, announcing that a reason is about to be introduced.


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