11

For “online” you could say: colligatus (from colligare) conexus (from conectere, note: long o, single n!) Thus for “offline” you could say: incolligatus inconexus Or you could go a different route and say: seiunctus (from seiungere), or alternatively: disiunctus (from disiungere) These would be technical terms describing the state of a software program ...


5

It might be a long shot here, but I would like to suggest simply: insum & absum This is somewhat lax/figurative usage, but this sometimes happens in other living languages, that a common word is simply adapted to denote another meaning. Not sure I'm correct here, but consider example on/off for electronic device. Got this idea from ephemeris site, ...


5

Great question! One of the things I love about Latin is how it is often so much more concrete than English. Going with that, and thinking of interrete (internet) as a literal net, I wonder whether intra interrete (online) and extra interrete (offline) would work. Per Sabbata extra rete eram, sed nunc infra sum. (On Saturday I was offline, but now I'm on....


3

The best word I can think of is furor. It has translations such as "rage, madness, fury" and has a range of uses. I find it to be a suitable for a meltdown as well, although it may or may not be the most suitable word.


2

I like anima more than organismus, so I guess I'd prefer anima cybernētica to cybernēticus organismus, or just cybernētica for short. Of course, cybernēticus [homo] or cybernēticum [animal] would also work.


1

Some common rules seem to emerge: avoid hybrid words, use connecting vowels in compounding, chose the specifically appropriate word(s) to adapt, there seems to be a preference for compounding (unsure about this), and the Vatican seems to prefer phrases to compounds as do others. It seems that hybrid words may not be preferable in Greek and Latin neologisms, ...


1

In angustias esse. I haven't really found a spot-on equivalent, and angustiae obviously has a wide range of meanings, some of which might be appropriate, and others of which are most definitely not appropriate. But then, of course, the same could be said of meltdown, so I have convinced myself to propose it. To be in angustias typically means you've been ...


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