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11 votes
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How do you say "online" and "offline" in Latin?

For “online” you could say: colligatus (from colligare) conexus (from conectere, note: long o, single n!) Thus for “offline” you could say: incolligatus inconexus Or you could go a different route ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
10 votes
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Creating place names from Latin verbs?

Almost there, but the -t- belongs to the verb, not suffix. In particular, it's the fourth principle part (the supine/perfect participle) of the verb. For the verb: vomo, vomere, vomui, vomitus (or -...
cmw's user avatar
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8 votes

Latin prefix to describe the wiping out of robots

My vote is for automatocide for the following reasons: (1) automatos / αυτοματος (sg), automata / αυτοματα (pl) is attested in ancient literature as referring to self-acting, autonomous, mechanical ...
Penelope's user avatar
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7 votes
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How do you say ‘switch’ (noun) in Latin?

A common Neo-Latin term for an electrical switch seems to be epitonium (ēlectricum). Epitonium, ‑iī, n (also epitonion or epistomium) is a classical vocable meaning a water cock, i.e., a valve for ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
7 votes

What is a "robot" in Latin?

What's the closest word Classical Latin (Greek?) would have used for mobile machines, even if they don't have a human shape? (NB: this answer is adapted slightly from another answer I gave here) I ...
Penelope's user avatar
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6 votes

What is a "robot" in Latin?

The word was invented by Karel Capek's brother in 1920 and used in his novel (in Czech), of which the title is translated into English as 'Rossum's Universal Robots'. It suggests (forced) labour ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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5 votes
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What is the meaning of praeprimis?

It is a modern synonym for imprimis, meaning foremost. It can also be used to begin a list of items, like in a treaty or legal will document. (Note that in modern scientific Latin, imprimis is often ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,077
5 votes

How do you say "online" and "offline" in Latin?

It might be a long shot here, but I would like to suggest simply: insum & absum This is somewhat lax/figurative usage, but this sometimes happens in other living languages, that a common word is ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes

How do you say "online" and "offline" in Latin?

Great question! One of the things I love about Latin is how it is often so much more concrete than English. Going with that, and thinking of interrete (internet) as a literal net, I wonder whether ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,771
5 votes
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What can be used as a Latin word for "Meltdown" (in the sense used for people with Autism)?

The best word I can think of is furor. It has translations such as "rage, madness, fury" and has a range of uses. I find it to be a suitable for a meltdown as well, although it may or may not be the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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Coining a word for "to make hill-shaped"

I suggest using clivus or mons for "hill". Especially the second one is easily recognized, and I believe many English speakers would understand the verb "montify" (< montificare) in context. The ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes

Coining a word for "to make hill-shaped"

Though this may not entirely appropriate, the first thing that came to my mind was the Vulgate's rendering of Isaiah 40:4, omnis vallis exaltabitur et omnis mons et collis humiliabitur et erunt ...
brianpck's user avatar
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5 votes

What would be the etymologically Greek spelling of 'misogynoir'?

I would suggest that your first choice is almost right - just get rid of the connecting vowel -o-, in other words: misomelangyny. (Typically, the combining form of μελας is μελαν‐ .)
varro's user avatar
  • 4,698
4 votes
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Word construction like "philanthropist" but regarding silence instead of humankind?

Latin freely adopted Greek words, including compounds, but in general did not freely create compounds with both Latin and Greek elements, like the modern creation "sociology", and similarly with your ...
varro's user avatar
  • 4,698
4 votes
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Suffix counterpart of klepto-?

Disclaimer: I don't know any Greek. This is an answer based on Internet research (and now some helpful comments from Modern Greek speakers), not an expert answer. I would advise against accepting it ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is there any Neo-Latin word for the concepts of "hacking" and "hacker"?

In the more criminal sense, you could have: fur / praedo computatralis. This describes the activities of e.g. hackers who steal trade secrets or break into computer networks unlawfully, but it would ...
cmw's user avatar
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3 votes
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What would be the etymologically Greek spelling of 'misogynoir'?

The Greek word for a Black man is Αἰθίοψ, -οπος, and for a Black woman Αἰθιοπίς, -ίδος. So what about “misoaethiopidy”, with stress on the antepaenultima?
fdb's user avatar
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3 votes
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Translating plant names used attributively

Using the genitive singular of mālum seems to be common and perhaps the safest choice. I don't think it necessarily means "the juice/flower of one apple"; I think it can be interpreted as &...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
2 votes

Suffix counterpart of klepto-?

L/S has: βόο-κλεψ, contr. βοῦκλεψ, ὁ, A stealer of oxen, S[ophocles].Fr[agment]318.
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k
2 votes

Latin for a "control knob"

One option is bulla, which can be used to refer to a door-knob, as in the below quote from Plautus: jussine in splendorem dari bullas has foribus nostris? Plautus, As., 2:4:20 It has a range of ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.7k
2 votes

How to translate "by means of utterance"?

I am not sure how well this would work for a paper written in English, but as far as Latin goes I would use an ablative of means. An ablative of means, like the name suggests, tells the means by ...
Kevin Miller's user avatar
2 votes

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

Some common rules seem to emerge: avoid hybrid words, use connecting vowels in compounding, chose the specifically appropriate word(s) to adapt, there seems to be a preference for compounding (unsure ...
Lulah's user avatar
  • 171
2 votes
Accepted

Create new word: super + portare

The relevant Latin prefixes are sub- and super-, the first of which becomes sup- before a p. Thus the analogous Latin verb would be superportare. This verb seems not to exist in classical Latin, but ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

Is there any Neo-Latin word for the concepts of "hacking" and "hacker"?

Plautus uses the term perfossor parietum (dig-througher of walls) to describe a burglar, someone who breaks into a building. My understanding of hacking is that it's less about theft per se than about ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,940
2 votes

Is there any Neo-Latin word for the concepts of "hacking" and "hacker"?

Fun question. I think the very best answer would depend on the period you were aiming to evoke. Starting from the actual meaning of 'hacker' as a capable, creative, and enthusiastic programmer and the ...
lly's user avatar
  • 776
1 vote

Is there any Neo-Latin word for the concepts of "hacking" and "hacker"?

Nuntii Latini calls Linus Torvalds "sollertissimus programmator", I guess that's as good as you can get for "hacker" (in the positive sense of the word). If you mean "computer ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
1 vote

Origin of the neologism "radiodrome"

I've corrected the Wikipedia article and made it conform to the German version. The term is derived from the Latin word radius and the Greek word dromos, for there is a radial component in its ...
Tankut Beygu's user avatar
1 vote

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

Many Latin's lovers across the world would like use the Latin in the today's life, but they cannot find Latin names for the things of our time. Answering to your question is not easy. First, we need ...
Marcus's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
Accepted

Is there a New Latin word for Cyborg?

I like anima more than organismus, so I guess I'd prefer anima cybernētica to cybernēticus organismus, or just cybernētica for short. Of course, cybernēticus [homo] or cybernēticum [animal] would also ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,771

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