11

For “online” you could say: colligatus (from colligare) conexus (from conectere, note: long o, single n!) Thus for “offline” you could say: incolligatus inconexus Or you could go a different route and say: seiunctus (from seiungere), or alternatively: disiunctus (from disiungere) These would be technical terms describing the state of a software program ...


8

My vote is for automatocide for the following reasons: (1) automatos / αυτοματος (sg), automata / αυτοματα (pl) is attested in ancient literature as referring to self-acting, autonomous, mechanical beings. Some examples include: The self-opening gates of Olympus (αυτομαται πυλαι) in Homer, Iliad, 5.749 The self-moving tripods Hephaestus made, referred to ...


5

I suggest using clivus or mons for "hill". Especially the second one is easily recognized, and I believe many English speakers would understand the verb "montify" (< montificare) in context. The word clivus might not be as easily recognized, but it might still work well and it leads to natural-sounding derivatives in English. Starting from clivus or a ...


5

Though this may not entirely appropriate, the first thing that came to my mind was the Vulgate's rendering of Isaiah 40:4, omnis vallis exaltabitur et omnis mons et collis humiliabitur et erunt prava in directa et aspera in vias planas. The KJV version (as used by Händel) translates as: Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill ...


5

I would suggest that your first choice is almost right - just get rid of the connecting vowel -o-, in other words: misomelangyny. (Typically, the combining form of μελας is μελαν‐ .)


5

It might be a long shot here, but I would like to suggest simply: insum & absum This is somewhat lax/figurative usage, but this sometimes happens in other living languages, that a common word is simply adapted to denote another meaning. Not sure I'm correct here, but consider example on/off for electronic device. Got this idea from ephemeris site, ...


5

Great question! One of the things I love about Latin is how it is often so much more concrete than English. Going with that, and thinking of interrete (internet) as a literal net, I wonder whether intra interrete (online) and extra interrete (offline) would work. Per Sabbata extra rete eram, sed nunc infra sum. (On Saturday I was offline, but now I'm on....


5

What's the closest word Classical Latin (Greek?) would have used for mobile machines, even if they don't have a human shape? (NB: this answer is adapted slightly from another answer I gave here) I think perhaps automaton or automatum. I’m not aware of any Roman writings on robots as such, whereas the Greeks wrote surprisingly frequently about robot-like ...


5

The word was invented by Karel Capek's brother in 1920 and used in his novel (in Czech), of which the title is translated into English as 'Rossum's Universal Robots'. It suggests (forced) labour robota and related words in Slavic languages (e.g. Russian robotnik, 'worker'). The Romans adopted plenty of foreign words quite without shame, for simple ...


4

Latin freely adopted Greek words, including compounds, but in general did not freely create compounds with both Latin and Greek elements, like the modern creation "sociology", and similarly with your suggested form "silenciophile" (better "silentiophile"). If you want to create a compound with "-phile", then "hesychophile" would be better, consisting of ...


4

Disclaimer: I don't know any Greek. This is an answer based on Internet research (and now some helpful comments from Modern Greek speakers), not an expert answer. I would advise against accepting it or using it as the basis of any serious decision about forming a word. "-klopy"/"-clopy" seems most preferable to me in that there are at least two Greek words ...


3

The best word I can think of is furor. It has translations such as "rage, madness, fury" and has a range of uses. I find it to be a suitable for a meltdown as well, although it may or may not be the most suitable word.


3

The Greek word for a Black man is Αἰθίοψ, -οπος, and for a Black woman Αἰθιοπίς, -ίδος. So what about “misoaethiopidy”, with stress on the antepaenultima?


2

I am not sure how well this would work for a paper written in English, but as far as Latin goes I would use an ablative of means. An ablative of means, like the name suggests, tells the means by which something is accomplished. The noun (the means) is declined into the ablative case, and it does not require any other words to convey its meaning in the ...


2

One option is bulla, which can be used to refer to a door-knob, as in the below quote from Plautus: jussine in splendorem dari bullas has foribus nostris? Plautus, As., 2:4:20 It has a range of other, quite different meanings, like "bubble" and even "amulet," but with proper context it should do the trick!


2

L/S has: βόο-κλεψ, contr. βοῦκλεψ, ὁ, A stealer of oxen, S[ophocles].Fr[agment]318.


2

I like anima more than organismus, so I guess I'd prefer anima cybernētica to cybernēticus organismus, or just cybernētica for short. Of course, cybernēticus [homo] or cybernēticum [animal] would also work.


1

Some common rules seem to emerge: avoid hybrid words, use connecting vowels in compounding, chose the specifically appropriate word(s) to adapt, there seems to be a preference for compounding (unsure about this), and the Vatican seems to prefer phrases to compounds as do others. It seems that hybrid words may not be preferable in Greek and Latin neologisms, ...


1

In angustias esse. I haven't really found a spot-on equivalent, and angustiae obviously has a wide range of meanings, some of which might be appropriate, and others of which are most definitely not appropriate. But then, of course, the same could be said of meltdown, so I have convinced myself to propose it. To be in angustias typically means you've been ...


1

Theoretically, I imagine it would actually come from κλεψί-, which classically would be -clepsy, though I suppose for consistency's sake it should be -klepsy. (I prefer the former.) You see the root in a number of compounds, such as the awesome κλεψιποτέω "to steal a drink" or "to drink unfairly." It's possible to also come from κλωπεία, thus -clopy or -...


1

Mark Antony used "arrigare" for "tumesce" in his letter to Octavian. (As quoted in Suetonius's Life of Augustus "An refert, ubi et in qua tu arrigas?" at the conclusion of Antony's response to Octavian's accusation that he is having an affair with a foreign queen, he defends himself by saying that that woman is his wife and Octavian cheats on his wife all ...


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