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Manuductio (verb: manuduco) is a late Latin word that literally means, "leading by the hand." See, for instance, "Mind Forming and Manuductio in Aquinas" (pay-wall protected), which discusses the word in the works of Thomas Aquinas. The Dictionnaire latin-français des auteurs du Moyen-Age gives as its earliest citation a work by Thomas ...


10

If a book has a cryptic title like that, it is always a good idea to look whether perhaps the author explains the title in the preface. The preface starts thus: Etsi magna negotiorum mole quotidie me obrutum esse non ignorent, qui labores meos perspectos habent; in felicitatem tamen generis humani pronus cum id unice mihi datum esse existimem, ut aliis ...


7

If a verb has both a reflexive pronoun and an accusative object, it has effectively two accusative objects. That is not so uncommon in Latin – quite a few verbs take a “double accusative.” Some are a little surpising, for example with celare: Catilina consilium senatum celavit. Catiline concealed his plan from the senate. But there is another class of ...


5

First, there is no universal "Latin". Each era, or even each author, has their own style of Latin. According to Wikipedia, quantifiers ("for all" and "there exists") first appeared in the 4th century BC. One of the notable works on this matter is De Interpretatione, composed by Aristotle, and translated into Latin in the 6th ...


5

The main verb of the clause, datur is impersonal. In English the subject 'it' would be used (though, grammatically speaking, the real subject is the infinitive cognoscere). → '...it isn't given/granted/permitted...' or even '...it isn't possible....' Remember that cognoscere really means 'know' or to 'be familiar with' only in the perfective tenses (perfect, ...


4

To add to Sebastian's answer, there are two ways in which classical Latin can borrow Greek words. The stem of the word is normally always written in Latin letters representing the sound of the Greek word semi-phonetically, e.g. αι becomes ae and ησ becomes es. But the ending can be written in two ways: Write the word like the stem, in Latin letters semi-...


4

Note that queat is subjunctive: This is an indirect question, and the governing clause is quaestio multo magis ardua videtur. The context is that Euler previously talked about deriving the Lambert series from the trinomial equation, now – vicissim means “on the other hand, then again, etc.” – he turns to the return journey. I'm not entirely sure how to ...


4

To address your points: Se is a reflexive pronoun, because extendere is used reflexively here. As such it refers to the subject of the sentence, which is quae. This relative pronoun obviously refers to methodus. (Summam is not only not the subject of this sentence, it's the object of habentes, so miles away, logically speaking.) I would interpret ...


4

You need the whole sentence. Reading from this scan, I get: Varii in Analysin recepti sunt modi quantitates, quae alias difficulter assignari queant, commode exprimendi. It might be easier to parse if I reorder it so that the words that belong together are actually close: In Analysin recepti sunt varii modi commode exprimendi quantitates, quae alias ...


4

I think for this time, the correct translation is "Nebenstunden" as books are titled in this time containing short essays of less importance, reserved for the spare time beside the serious work. Compare titles as "Nebenstunden" by Darjes and others.


4

I will venture a translation. I start with a very literal version, which I do not usually do (it always smacks of “see, teacher, I recognised the ablative plural” etc. to me), but in this case there are some things that I am not sure about, so I want to be explicit about how I understand things. I will then also provide a more usable translation. Quae ...


3

The study of art is often approached from the perspective that its quality is related to its beauty or to the extent that it is perceived as pleasurable. In this case, aesthetics or esthetics is the branch of philosophy which studies the nature of beauty. The philosopher Nick Zangwell says the following: [T]here were always some thinkers — philosophers, as ...


3

I'd put it this way: "[...] which value however cannot be known other than by approximation [I think this is the mathematical term]." 'Literally' (I don't like that term and don't really think it makes sense, but anyhow): "[...] which value however other than by approximation ('by approaching', a gerund in the ablative) to know (it) is not ...


2

Est visum is perfect passive but impersonal (the actual subject being the infinitive exhibere). It means something like 'it has seemed best' or 'it has seemed proper.' Hanc seriem is the direct object of exhibere. When the verb evadere has a predicate noun or adjective, as here (permutabiles), it means 'To end up, emerge, turn out (as)' (definition 8a in ...


2

If you're looking for an English word, it's aesthetics. If you're looking for a Latin word, it's aesthetica. Classical Latin had no word for the study of art. The word was coined, in Latin, by philosopher Alexander Gottlieb Baumgarten in 1735 in his master's thesis Meditationes Philosophicae de Nonnullis ad Poema Pertinentibus. The 1765 edition of Baumgarten'...


1

The most natural phrasing in Latin that I can think of would be studium artis. The word studium has all kinds of meanings along the lines of devotion, study, endeavor, and inclination. Whether you produce art yourself or are an avid consumer, I think studium artis is a good choice. I would argue that there is no single-word solution in Latin if you want to ...


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