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17 votes
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If arm is 'arma', why is unarmed 'inermis' and not 'inarmis'?

I believe this is one of many examples of Latin vowel reduction in word-internal syllables. The basic pattern is that short vowels in word-internal syllables were reduced: the resulting vowel in ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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10 votes
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John Owen's poem: Umquam or numquam?

It seems plausible that Latin version you quoted is corrupt and the original had numquam, in which case "numquam rediturus ad ortum" would refer to the fact that the sun's course in the sky ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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10 votes

Scope of negation with absolute constructions

What follows is not an answer but just some initial thoughts related to your question. My first impression/intuition is like the one you express at the end of your post. I'd be surprised to find ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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10 votes
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What would this pun mean?

δοῦσα is a feminine nom. sg. participle, but it's more likely to be taken as the aorist participle of δίδωμι 'give' than the present participle of δέω 'bind': generally, monosyllabic stems (like δε-) ...
TKR's user avatar
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9 votes
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How can you tell whether prefixed ‘in-’ is the preposition ‘in’ or Indo-European ‘in-’?

The negative prefix in- typically attaches to an adjective, while the prepositional prefix in- typically attaches to a verb. The main complication to this distribution is the existence of adjectives ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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8 votes
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Latin translation of "don't get caught"

I'd suggest a very slightly less literal translation using the verb caveo "beware", with ne and subjunctive: Cave ne capiaris! Literally this means "watch out you don't get caught!&...
TKR's user avatar
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7 votes

If arm is 'arma', why is unarmed 'inermis' and not 'inarmis'?

All credit of this answer goes to sumelic. I just found further support for his hypothesis, of which I was not aware. This article states: Bader (1960: 236) remarks that words prefixed by ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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7 votes

How can you tell whether prefixed ‘in-’ is the preposition ‘in’ or Indo-European ‘in-’?

I don't think it's possible to distinguish in meaning "in" from PIE *en and in- meaning "not" from PIE *n̥ from pronunciation alone. It's well known that the /i/ in in- lengthens when followed by ...
varro's user avatar
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6 votes
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Expressing English modalities of advice in Latin

One way you can do this is using the verb debeo, debere, debui, debitus, which not only means "to owe," but also "ought/should." It's relatively simple in its construction, so lets go through each ...
Sam K's user avatar
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5 votes
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Can 'non' with gerundive mean both lack of obligation and negative obligation?

The following examples are of the negated gerundive clearly equivalent to a prohibition. The pair faciendum / non faciendum is used to indicate positive and negative obligation, as evidenced by the ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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5 votes
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How do I say "this must not happen"?

There are three or four impersonal verbs to express what is appropriate, or legal, or obligatory. 1 děcet, it is appropriate 2 dēděcet, it is inapproptiate, unseemly. Ut nobis decet; As seems ...
Hugh's user avatar
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5 votes

How do I say "this must not happen"?

In my experience many languages confuse lack of desire and desire of the contrary. For example, I would like to be able to say "I don't want coffee" as the negation of "I want coffee", meaning that I ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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How do I negate an ut clause of result?

It appears that you can use (non) satis with a result clause to mean 'not x enough to (do y)': non satis strenue laborabam ut centum epistulas scripserim. I didn't work hard enough to (manage to) ...
cnread's user avatar
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5 votes
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How to say "Don't even..."?

To answer your question, one could choose to interpret it to have an unspoken clause, as per the comments to the first answer. There are indeed ways to express this in Latin: nē (…) quidem [–––] nōn ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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4 votes
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Equivalent of "-less"

Latin seems to be far less uniform in this than English. Unfortunately there is no single way to derive adjectives indicating a lack. Here are some possible ways: Someone without cura is securus, but ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Equivalent of "-less"

It probably depends on the noun, but the normal negative/privative affix is in-, which is related to English un-, Greek a(n)- (the alpha privans), and all/most Indo-European negations with nasal ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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4 votes
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Anyone know where "immorito" comes from?

It's a mistake for non immerito, which indeed means "not without cause." The phrase is classical and abundantly attested. In your second link, it can be difficult to see, but it's actually ...
cmw's user avatar
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3 votes

Latin translation of "don't get caught"

I think the best choice is noli(te) with infinitive. It comes across as an order, not as a wish, and in this context I think an order "don't get caught" is a more suitable tone than a wish &...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

What is the correct etymology of ignōscō "pardon"?

In a comment, Alex B. referred to the 2001 Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue latine by Alfred Ernout and Antoine Meillet, which contains the following passage: Les grammairiens latins voyaient ...
2 votes

Equivalent of "-less"

This is not how Latin works. Use carēre + abl. if you need a verb, or vacuus/plenus + abl./gen. if you want to modify a noun: “itaque cum sumus necessariis negotiis curisque vacui...” (De Oficiis, I....
Ερις's user avatar
1 vote

What is the correct etymology of ignōscō "pardon"?

As for more recent scholarship on this topic, I recommend you to take a look at the following monograph by G. Haverling, who is THE expert on -sco verbs. HAVERLING, Gerd (2000). On sco-Verbs, ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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1 vote

How to say "Don't even..."?

What you are looking for is an adverb that means "not even," as "Do not even move!" Various words could fit this description, such as nec, necnon, or ne...quidem. Ne...quidem was the most common form ...
Sam K's user avatar
  • 3,998

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