11

This is garbled Latin that looks like the misguided effort of a first-year Latin student (or perhaps, more likely, Google Translate). The meaning (in outline) is clear to me as an English speaker: Perhaps I accept your strident speech. I am Quintus Fabius, the centurion of the star ship "The Hammer of Jesus." What are you, what are you doing in this ...


10

The Online Etymological Dictionary states His [Castor's] name was given to secretions of the animal (Latin castoreum), used medicinally in ancient times. (Through this association his name replaced the native Latin word for "beaver," which was fiber.) Castoreum has been used medicinally since Classical times, prominently as an ingredient in material ...


10

It is of the first declension, but not of the most typical kind. I would divide the first declension into four classes: NOM -a -ās -ē -ēs ACC -am -am/-ān -ēn -ēn GEN -ae -ae -ēs -ae DAT -ae -ae -ae -ae ABL -ā -ā -ē -ē VOC -a -ā -ē -ē The last three classes are reserved (almost completely) for Greek names....


10

The entry for Anna in Wiktionary certainly states that it derives from the Hebrew Hannah. And this is how Augustine uses it in The City of God against the Pagans, in book 17, when referring to Hannah, the mother of Samuel (mater quoque ipsa Samuelis Anna ...) However, there is the possibility that Anna is in fact a Latin name, based on the Roman goddess ...


6

Not every theta automatically makes a word cognate with 'god.' If the apparent etymology of the name Pentheus is correct, it's just formed from the noun πένθος, 'grief'/'misery,' and the -εύς suffix (which, according to Smyth's Greek grammar, §843, denotes 'the person concerned or occupied by [a] thing'). In this case, the theta belongs to the root itself ...


6

Just to come back to part of the original question, Virgil did not come up with this part of the story himself. Anna as sister of Dido already occurs in Naevius and Varro; this does of course not invalidate the explanations given. See Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, vol. II col. 108,3.


6

Here's an example I remember, Verg., Ecl., 8, 96 Has herbas atque haec Ponto mihi lecta venena ipse dedit Moeris; nascuntur plurima Ponto. His ego saepe lupum fieri et se condere silvis Moerim [...] Lit. Moeris himself gave me these herbs and choice Pontian potions (they are abundantly growing in Pontus). I saw myself not once how Moeris turned ...


5

For some reason, “strix” and “striga” have not found their way into de Vaan’s etymological dictionary. The older dictionary by Walde does connect “strix” with “strideo”, tracing them back to an IE *strei- “to screech”, with two different extensions: -g and -d.


5

Penelope's survey of available evidence seems to be virtually complete. I chiefly want to observe — with no detriment at all to Penelope's answer — that it relies wholly on mythology, which is really all that we have. Even the mythology may have no more substance than one man's (Ovid's) imagination. Although it is now mostly disregarded, one of the most ...


5

Theseus's description in Seneca the younger's Hercules furens (lines 662ff.) (English translation, Latin text) is quite detailed in terms of geography/topography, architecture, atmosphere, vegetation, and the various figures one would encounter there. There's no inferno.


5

According to Pliny the Elder, iron seems to be resistant to magic. Several remedies require things being done sine ferro (translations via Loeb): XXIV.VI: quidam id religione efficacius fieri putant prima luna collectum e robore sine ferro, si terram non attigerit... Some superstitiously believe that the mistletoe proves more efficacious if it be ...


5

Setting aside the impossibility of a linguistic connection, there's also the issue that only one of the brothers, Pollux, was known for boxing (not wrestling); Castor was known for something having to do with horses (horsemanship or maybe horse taming). This is very often brought up when the twins are mentioned – or, as in this passage from Horace, Satires 2....


5

Some of this is already included in the comments, but let me try to organize the various thoughts into an answer. First, discordia is quite literally "separate-heartedness". The prefix dĭs- (with a short I) indicates separation physically or mentally; cf. discurrere and dissentire for example. The Latin stem cord- means "heart", and the D is dropped ...


5

Numen isn't the best without either ignoring the "all around us" aspect or resorting to some discredited twentieth century arguments about the word. Still, as a means of personal power in a Jedi, I can see it being used. However, what is most commonly used is indeed vis, which was standard at least back in 2000. For the full phrase, Vis vobiscum (or in the ...


4

Of course, this is a very interesting question. From a purely chronological point of view one could imagine that Ovid might have run across a copy of the Septuagint and read there of how Noah’s ark came to rest on ὄρη τὰ ᾿Αραράτ. Having said this, I do not see that there is any evidence that the Septuagint, or any other version of the Hebrew scripture, was ...


4

I agree with the assessment that this is poorly imitated Latin, or perhaps a robotic translation from the web. I disagree that in an imaginary universe Latin could possibly have evolved to sound like that, but that's a speculative debate at best. I would vary the translation provided by Slarty slightly, to produce the following: "Let's say I buy what you ...


4

This passage (Met. 1.61-2) is about the creation of the world, and the winds are taking up their allotted quarters. Eurus isn't blowing towards the East, he's taking up his station there to become the East Wind. (Btw subdita here isn't "submissive to", but simply "placed under".)


4

Book VI of the Aeneid is over 900 lines of dactylic hexameter describing a catabasis to the Underworld. (Out of those 900-some, about 600 lines actually describe the Underworld; the remaining 300 are spent on preparations and travel to get there.) Many English translations are available, but this one stays relatively close to the Latin. Starting at line 548 ...


3

As Hugh pointed out in comments on my other answer, Plato goes into significant detail on the River Pyriphlegethon, in his Phaedo dialogue (specifically section 113). τρίτος δὲ ποταμὸς τούτων κατὰ μέσον ἐκβάλλει, καὶ ἐγγὺς τῆς ἐκβολῆς ἐκπίπτει εἰς τόπον μέγαν πυρὶ πολλῷ καόμενον, καὶ λίμνην ποιεῖ μείζω τῆς παρ᾽ ἡμῖν θαλάττης, ζέουσαν ὕδατος καὶ πηλοῦ: ...


3

The Diccionario Griego-Español is more complete than Liddell-Scott, but only goes up to epsilon: http://dge.cchs.csic.es/xdge/βροτολοιγός funesto para los mortales epít. de Ares Il.5.31, Od.8.115, Hes.Sc.333, Tyrt.1.47, A.Supp.665, Sch.D.T.234.14, Corn.ND 21, de Eros AP 5.180 (Mel.), 12.37 (Diosc.), de Eris, Timo SHell.795, cóm. de un pederasta o ...


3

It's probably supposed to be a version of Latin that has undergone a certain mutation over time. This is, however, entirely a guess, I have not read the book (or books, if this is part of a series.) I think the line is "I have heard your type of speech before." English is a Germanic language, which is why double negatives should never be used, though they ...


3

Yes Phoebus Apollo was the sun god during the time of Augustine at Rome! The worship of Apollo was widespread not only in Greece but also throughout the ancient world. Shrines could be found in places from Egypt to Anatolia (now northwestern Turkey). The Romans built their first temple to Apollo (Phoebus) in 432 B . C ., and he became a favorite Roman ...


2

Thanks for the very helpful translations! To finally solve the mystery for all concerned, this exact paragraph is translated by the author himself in Chapter 3 of the sequel to the book as follows: I think I understand your guttural speech. I am Quintus Fabius, centurion of the star vessel Malleus Jesu. Who are you, and what are you doing in this ...


1

"Pre-Greek" according to Beekes.


1

BL Harley 2253 (folio132) is a 13thC. copy of a document from Much Wenlock Abbey, Shropshire, UK. The Legend of Etfridus the Priest was composed around CE 1000, in the Ramsey Abbey style (i.e. polysyllabic, with classical allusions). Unlike the Aeneid this is not written as an eyewitness account; Etfrid describes (in rhymed prose) what would have happened to ...


1

I don't know if this is the oldest, but from Dionysius of Halicarnassus's Roman Antiquities 2.34 (first century BCE): Μετὰ δὲ τὴι πομπήν τε καὶ θυσίαν νεὼν κατασκευάσας ὁ Ῥωμύλος ἐπὶ τῆς κορυφῆς τοῦ Καπιτωλίου Διός, ὃν ἐπικαλοῦσι Ῥωμαῖοι Φερέτριον, οὐ μέγαν (ἔτι γὰρ αὐτοῦ σώζεται τὸ ἀρχαῖον ἴχνος ἐλάττονας ἢ πέντε ποδῶν καὶ δέκα τὰς μείζους πλευρὰς ἔχον) ...


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