New answers tagged

6

The praefix ex/e/ec- has an 'original' meaning of "out, away" (emitto, evanesco), which also developed into a more general idea of privation or even negation, like "un-" (exonero). Another later sense is "throughout, to the end", which additionally developed into "thoroughly, completely" (evinco, enarro) in turn. I ...


15

You'll basically have to memorise them, yes, though there are patterns. Both the η- in ἠλευθέρουν and the ει- in εἶχον represent a contraction of ε + ε, but the former is much older than the latter. The ε + ε > η contraction dates to a time (prehistoric, as far as Attic is concerned) when η was still meaningfully the long version of ε, which is also when ...


-6

I am going to diverge from brianpck's answer. In my opinion the OP is correct, or at least partially correct. The translation in the vulgate is WRONG. Basically Jerome got it wrong when he translated it 1600 years ago. Even though βασιλείας is indeed genitive, it is a genitive of place, not a genitive of possession. The Greek genitive is much different than ...


10

The Latin is a pretty literal translation of the Greek: καὶ κηρύσσων τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τῆς βασιλείας "τῆς βασιλείας" (tēs basileias) is genitive, not dative. He is preaching the Gospel of the kingdom, not preaching the Gospel to the kingdom. This makes sense. The "kingdom" in question--as is clear from many other passages throughout the New ...


3

Feels a little cheap as an answer here, but the auto-generated Related Links suggests to me the excellent Was “Pascha” ever used as a neuter first-declension noun? which provides a possible example of an exception here. Absolutely none of this answer is original research, I am merely reporting what I see in that question and its answers. Notably, the ...


11

Dōnum is neuter; amīcus, fīlius, and ager are masculine. Neuter nouns are always the same in both the nominative and accusative case, in both singular and plural. See this question for more about how universal this is. Here are some more neuter nouns that you may be familiar with (from early chapters in Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata): Baculum dominī in ...


5

donum is neuter, and hence its ending in both the nominative and accusative plural is -a.


5

This is because of the gender of the noun. Donum is neuter, wheras filius, amicus, etc, are masculine. The plural accusative for 2nd declension neuter nouns is -a.


3

At an earlier stage the connection between singular and plural forms was sometimes clearer, with -s serving as a straightforward plural marker in at least some of the cases. Sound changes and analogical levelling have made that much harder to see, though. Possibly the clearest view is in the masculine thematic nouns (Latin second declension). Consider e.g. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included