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22 votes

To what extent are Koine and modern Greek mutually intelligible?

It's anecdotal, but whenever I taught ancient Greek, my modern Greek students were usually the first to drop. It is not at all what they expected, and they were not happy about the ancient ...
cmw's user avatar
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20 votes

To what extent are Koine and modern Greek mutually intelligible?

Quite difficult. The pronunciation has changed significantly from Koine to Modern Greek, and anecdotally, my Modern-Greek-speaking friends and I usually have to write out words when discussing them: ...
Draconis's user avatar
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17 votes
Accepted

Are "μπ" and "ντ" indicators that the word didn't exist in Koine/Ancient Greek?

Koiné Greek & earlier lacked initial <μπ>, <ντ>, or <γκ> although these strings are commonplace word-internally. There are however a small number of Modern Greek words beginning &...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 551
16 votes

Are "μπ" and "ντ" indicators that the word didn't exist in Koine/Ancient Greek?

No, there are plenty of ancient Greek words that have μπ and ντ in there somewhere. Two common words off the top of my head are ἀντί and πέμπω, thoroughly attested throughout ancient Greek. If you ...
cmw's user avatar
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11 votes

Are "μπ" and "ντ" indicators that the word didn't exist in Koine/Ancient Greek?

CMW is completely correct, but to add on a bit: The reason ΜΠ and ΝΤ are used for /b/ and /d/ nowadays is because, historically, the voiced stops Β Δ Γ turned into fricatives, and then later the ...
Draconis's user avatar
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8 votes

Are "μπ" and "ντ" indicators that the word didn't exist in Koine/Ancient Greek?

A small correction to a near mis-statement in the question. (I'm a native MG speaker.) μπ and ντ are not always pronounced as [b] and [d]! In fact, the "traditional" pronunciation is [mb] ...
Cosmas Zachos's user avatar
7 votes

To what extent are Koine and modern Greek mutually intelligible?

@Draconis pointed out that Homer is apparently a particularly hard to read example, and instead pointed me to what I believe is an example of Koine Greek (here) which I find relatively easy to read. ...
terdon's user avatar
  • 173
5 votes

(Ancient and Modern Greek) Pronunciations of ‘epsilon’ and ‘eta’

This will somewhat depend on what you define as "Ancient", but there are a few things we know for sure, about some nebulous point after Greek started being written down: At some prehistoric ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

To what extent are Koine and modern Greek mutually intelligible?

I actually am greek (and my mother language is greek and I've lived in Greece all my life) and was taught ancient greek for some years in high school. The conclusion? It was like a foreign language. ...
Serafeim's user avatar
  • 131
2 votes
Accepted

Why is tonos (sometimes) rendered different from oxia?

I don't have an authoritative source for this (I'm just drawing on my own experience), but given that this has gone several months without answers, I'll offer what I can. The fundamental difference ...
Draconis's user avatar
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