8 votes
Accepted

middle voice in Latin

The "middle function" can also be claimed to occur in perfective tenses (of both non-deponent and deponent verbs). For example, it's one of the three readings an ambiguous sentence like Porta clausa ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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6 votes

A process now in progress, with no agent

I'd suggest four approaches: A good way to convey a middle-voiced meaning is Latin is to use a reflexive pronoun. Fortasse orexis tua sānitātem portendit sē restituentem. = Maybe your appetite is a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

I believe I've found one example from Ovid(correct me if I'm wrong) where se movet and movetur are attested in the perfect to mean "changed/moved" “sunt, o fortissime, quorum forma semel ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

Perhaps Ov. Am. 3.8.7 would count as an example: Cum bene laudavit, laudato ianua clausa est. Even though she praises my text, the door has/is closed for the praised one. (my quick translation) ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

Thinking about your very interesting question ("That is, do we ever see non-deponent verbs with passive morphology, but able to take accusative direct objects and not able to take ablative agents?"), ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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4 votes

middle voice in Latin

In this paper (a book actually) it is claimed that the analytic perfect reflects an inactive structure (p. 85). You might find it interesting; the author, Laura Migliori, also explores the syntax of ...
Shootforthemoon's user avatar
4 votes

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

The way I see it, there is no middle voice in Latin, but there can certainly be traces of it. The situation is similar to the dual number. That said, looking for such traces is interesting. Here is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

Third time lucky! Here is then my third try in answering Draconis's intriguing question ("do we ever see non-deponent verbs with passive morphology, but able to take accusative direct objects and not ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Why does the future of εἰμί have the middle voice while the other tenses are active?

Basically, yes, it's just one of those "that's just the way it is" things. The descriptive synchronic answer, as Cerberus says, is simply that many verbs have middle deponent futures. You ...
TKR's user avatar
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1 vote

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

The perfect tense can be used in the active voice or the passive voice. It can also be used in ablative absolute constructions. We can express the idea "the door opened" in the following ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12k
1 vote

"Middle constructions" in Latin?

I will make the argument that maturo is such a verb. (which, in some respects, matches the English ripen/grow in this (which is not shared by other languages)). First, its primary meaning is the ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11k
1 vote

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a "middle voice"?

As comments-section grows, this is not so much an answer as an interpretation of Mitomino's "flava caput nectentur oliva": the assertion that "caput" is an accusative; not a nominative. Expressions ...
tony's user avatar
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