7

It is accusative plural, agreeing with res. "We have donated to the monastery which is called H. certain things (that were part) of our property".


7

Here's a literal translation of the four chapter titles: Christiani victores obsessi The Christian victors [are] besieged N.B. "obsessi" is the past participle of obsideo. Enumeratio civitatum persequitur The enumeration of cities continues Without context, this is harder to understand: I presume that a previous chapter began listing cities and ...


6

The debate over this question is ongoing, and the real question of the matter doesn't revolve around the meaning of the words which Gregory of Tour wrote in the second book of Libri Historiarum. His words in Latin simply don't support the translation "Bow your head, proud Sicamber!" (More about the Latin shortly.) On the contrary, the debate revolves around ...


6

The selenographical names can perhaps be viewed as appositions and would as such not be ungrammatical (Latin appositions may be incongruent in number or gender, like urbs Athenae). In that case both parts would have to be declined in parallel, e.g. Videsne Montes Agricolam? In my opinion one should take this as scientific terminology based on Latin, not ...


6

The first quote ("it does not seem to me...") can be seen here (p. 312 of the book you linked to) -- it begins 10 lines from the bottom of the first column, "mihi non videtur posse negari...". The quote as given by Laumonier is compressed from Juan de Lugo's original -- the last phrase, "what is the correct mathematical value of the object", corresponds to ...


5

What's the closest word Classical Latin (Greek?) would have used for mobile machines, even if they don't have a human shape? (NB: this answer is adapted slightly from another answer I gave here) I think perhaps automaton or automatum. I’m not aware of any Roman writings on robots as such, whereas the Greeks wrote surprisingly frequently about robot-like ...


5

The word was invented by Karel Capek's brother in 1920 and used in his novel (in Czech), of which the title is translated into English as 'Rossum's Universal Robots'. It suggests (forced) labour robota and related words in Slavic languages (e.g. Russian robotnik, 'worker'). The Romans adopted plenty of foreign words quite without shame, for simple ...


5

In classical times, foreign names (except Greek ones) were adopted into Latin based on their sound, not spelling. Suppose Caesar conquered a tribe in Gallia living on an island they called something like Betuwe (I don't know the exact sound/spelling); this word would be related to him in speech by messenger or a local inhabitant. He would hear it well or not ...


4

The main sentence is Secundo firmamentum caeli in medio libravit aquarum 'On the second day he poised the firmament of the Sky in the middle of the waters Matthew Paris now begins to back-track by inserting an enormous ablative absolute: ipsis aquis creatis 'those same waters having been created (past)' He then elaborates by describing what else ...


4

There is a superb (and very long) answer to a related question here. I won't reproduce it here, but some quotes from the post: (question) I am not a native English speaker; I am Italian. I am always puzzled when I hear the expression "quid pro quo" intended as "you scratch my back I scratch yours". In Italy we mean it as "...


4

Regarding sentence (1), I believe to understand the function of alia, you have to look at the following sentences: Unde vocum alia suavis est illa, scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. Alia perspicuaque omnem implet continuum locum, sicut clangor tubarum. Alia subtilis, cui non est spiritus multus sicut infantium, mulierum, aegrotantium. Alia ...


4

The first sentence is I think simply a question of a misplaced comma. It makes good sense if read as follows: Unde vocum alia suavis est, illa scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. That is, "For that reason one voice is sweet, namely that one which..." The second seems more puzzling. Could sunt maybe stand for an implied sunt qui ...


4

I think I may have an answer to my own question. Adams in "Social Variation and the Latin Language" says that there were two independent developments - 'au' was pronounced 'o' in certain rustic Latin words during the Classical period but in general 'au' remained the pronunciation, then there was a later development where words from Latin containing 'au' ...


4

Here's a literal translation: Likewise, the verses composed in praise of Christ by the Presbyter Juvencus. They are sung when they have returned and are approaching the main doors of the church. "Item" probably refers to whatever preceded, i.e. "in the same way as before." "Versi" seems to be the plural of "versus, -ūs" interpreted as 2nd ...


3

Your last three sentences are accurate, but I believe that the words optimo and optatissimo should be understood to be in the dative, being associated with proximum — that is, in the sense of "nearest to the best..." I would translate the first sentence as: He, who designated the way by which it not only can, but even should be attained, says that ...


3

There seems to be one typo in your sentence: as ("copper coin") almost certainly should be ad ("to"). Corrected in that way, here's a piece-by-piece breakdown of your sentence: Si If liberalitatis nostrae munere by the office of our generosity de beneficiis <a deo nobis> conlatis ...


3

According to Lexico it's origin as a phrase is mid-16th century medicine, and correlates with Wikipedia hinting that it's substituting one thing for another. Merriam-Webster gives a little bit more insight as well. It also gives the first known use as 1582, but doesn't provide a source for what that is. My guess from that is there is probably no classical ...


3

In any sense, the word to use is scintilla, 'spark' (possibly scintillula, though it would probably then be better translated as 'gleam'). Cicero in de Republica 2, 21 has: qui cum famulorum numero educatus ad epulas regis adsisteret, non latuit scintilla ingenii quae iam tum elucebat in puero.


3

Just to add to Brian's answer:The work in question is the treatise "de facultatibus partium animalium" by the famous medical writer Abū Bakr al-Rāzī (alias Rhazes; 10th century), here appended to the text of his medical encyclopaedia al-Kitāb al-Manṣūrī in the Latin translation by Gerald of Cremona (12th century). This is extant also in the Arabic original. ...


3

In the general instructions of the Breviarium Romanum I found the verbs ‘munire’ (= defend, protect) and ‘signare’ in the phrases ‘De ratione signo crucis se muniendi’ and ‘Omnes signant se signo crucis’. In addition, Du Cange. 1886. Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, vol. 7. p. 480, has a lemma 'signare', which says: 'signum crucis digitis ac manu ...


3

inexquisitum means ‘not having been examined in detail’ (cf. Du Cange. 1884. Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, vol. 3, p. 377 (exquisitus) and 1885, vol. 4, p. 349 (inexquisitus). supramemoratus means 'above-mentioned’.


2

I was able to find a PDF of an 1832 edition. I can't vouch for whether it has typographical errors.


2

Varro's Antiquities are probably the most famous example: they were quoted by Priscian (6c) — text in Keil's Grammatici Latini; the "Fasti of Ravenna" were quoted by the Anonymus Valesii, Agnellus (9c), and others (Hodgkin, Italy and Her Invaders, III.178). Cassiodorus had a copy of Seneca's Forma Mundi. Martin of Braga (6c) apparently had two of the younger ...


2

I've never heard of any special rule for ngi and nge versus gi and ge. The pronunciation of gi and ge with [dʒ] in Ecclesiastical Latin has no major exceptions that I know of. I remember reading about marginal exceptions with [g] for certain words from languages like Hebrew, e.g. Gehenna. But diphthongi is from Greek, and as far as I know [dʒ] is generally ...


2

I do not know the answer, but I will take a guess. There is a shrine in Rome called ecclesia Sancti Petri in vinculis where the chains that bound Saint Peter are kept as relics. A yearly festival in honor of Saint Peter was kept there, which (naturally enough) came to be called festum Sancti Petri ad vincula, the feast of Saint Peter "at the chains"...


2

It would be nice if you could give us a little more context. Where did you get this phrase? What book is it from? When was it published? It literally means "At Sext on Thirds and all Doubles". I know what Doubles are, they are a kind of feast with a high liturgical rank. I do not know what Thirds might be. Update: Thanks for the context supplied in your ...


1

I would analyse non obstante eo quod as “in spite of the fact that …, the fact that … notwithstanding” etc. (literally: “with it not hindering that …,” i.e., it is an ablativus absolutus). And why the subjunctive? I would say it is another case of the dreaded quod cum coniunctivo. I think you got the first part right but started stumbling at siue denique, ...


1

The following book is a good start. It doesn't have literal translations, but it does provide a lot of vocabulary and grammatical guidance. Reading Medieval Latin by Keith Sidwell From the blurb: "Reading Medieval Latin is an introduction to medieval Latin in its cultural and historical context and is designed to serve the needs of students who have ...


1

It appears that "quaesitum" and "ad inquirendum" are legal terms. See, for instance, this text, which repeats the following phrase multiple times: tam quaesitum quam ad inquirendum Another example of this usage is found in Histoire générale de Languedoc, which is also the record of a donation of land: Propterera cedimus . . . quantumcumque in ipsam ...


1

Footprint of the angel army I agree with Cerberus. Perhaps this should be a comment on his answer rather an independent answer, but I hear that the more answers the better for this site. This is the first meaning I thought of when I read the litany, and it seems to me (a big fan of Latin litanies) the most obvious meaning. Here Mary is thought of as a ...


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