10

I agree with brianpck's comment: I don't understand why you're reading this glyph as a Q. In isolation, it might look like a Q, but considering the context, it appears to be a variant of M (it's not that unusual I think for capital M to have a closed bottom in certain handwriting styles). Have you ever seen this glyph used for Q in this text? The symbol I ...


10

I'm afraid my answer is the boring one: free variation, based on the amount of space available. The tilde originally arose purely as an abbreviation: instead of writing an n or m in line with the text, it could be written above the vowel instead, saving a bit of space. Eventually its form got simplified into the tiny squiggle we use nowadays. But the ...


8

These triple dots appear to be serving two separate purposes. The passive -ur ending: In your first image, the word intended is perficientur, and the same triple dot is used on page 224 for cognoscentur. An interrogative sign: The first triple dot in your first image, and the succession of triple dots in your second, all seem to indicate that the preceding ...


7

It is accusative plural, agreeing with res. "We have donated to the monastery which is called H. certain things (that were part) of our property".


7

Here the predicative adjective nescius is taken as governing genitive (occasus) rather than accusative (occasum). In fact, this is also found in Classical Latin: e.g., nescia mens hominum fati sortisque futurae (Verg. Aen. 10, 501). So notice that in your example occasus is to be analyzed as an objective genitive (in parallel with fati sortisque futurae, ...


7

This is the "Versicle" character, Unicode 2123, "Versiculus", ℣ if your screen can display it. It is also possible that you may come across the "Response" character, U+211F, "Responsum", ℟, although this is much more common in the Liturgy of the Hours than in the Mass. (You will note that you have the word on your sample page, only slightly abbreviated).


6

To add a bit to Mitomino's excellent (and correct) answer: Vowel length, so unhelpfully ignored in most Mediaeval manuscripts, is the key here. Sōl orītur occāsūs nescius In other words, this is the genitive singular, not the nominative! Nescius, like some other words referring to knowledge and memory, can take its topic in the genitive. That's what's ...


6

The debate over this question is ongoing, and the real question of the matter doesn't revolve around the meaning of the words which Gregory of Tour wrote in the second book of Libri Historiarum. His words in Latin simply don't support the translation "Bow your head, proud Sicamber!" (More about the Latin shortly.) On the contrary, the debate revolves around ...


6

The first quote ("it does not seem to me...") can be seen here (p. 312 of the book you linked to) -- it begins 10 lines from the bottom of the first column, "mihi non videtur posse negari...". The quote as given by Laumonier is compressed from Juan de Lugo's original -- the last phrase, "what is the correct mathematical value of the object", corresponds to ...


5

In classical times, foreign names (except Greek ones) were adopted into Latin based on their sound, not spelling. Suppose Caesar conquered a tribe in Gallia living on an island they called something like Betuwe (I don't know the exact sound/spelling); this word would be related to him in speech by messenger or a local inhabitant. He would hear it well or not ...


5

The selenographical names can perhaps be viewed as appositions and would as such not be ungrammatical (Latin appositions may be incongruent in number or gender, like urbs Athenae). In that case both parts would have to be declined in parallel, e.g. Videsne Montes Agricolam? In my opinion one should take this as scientific terminology based on Latin, not ...


4

What's the closest word Classical Latin (Greek?) would have used for mobile machines, even if they don't have a human shape? (NB: this answer is adapted slightly from another answer I gave here) I think perhaps automaton or automatum. I’m not aware of any Roman writings on robots as such, whereas the Greeks wrote surprisingly frequently about robot-like ...


4

The word was invented by Karel Capek's brother in 1920 and used in his novel (in Czech), of which the title is translated into English as 'Rossum's Universal Robots'. It suggests (forced) labour robota and related words in Slavic languages (e.g. Russian robotnik, 'worker'). The Romans adopted plenty of foreign words quite without shame, for simple ...


4

There is a superb (and very long) answer to a related question here. I won't reproduce it here, but some quotes from the post: (question) I am not a native English speaker; I am Italian. I am always puzzled when I hear the expression "quid pro quo" intended as "you scratch my back I scratch yours". In Italy we mean it as "misunderstanding" (from the ...


4

An Early, Classical, and Late Latin synthetic expression corresponding to Sp. "llevar a cuestas" is the denominal verb bāiulāre (see the image below). As for analytic variants formed by a verb of motion plus a body part (the ones you appear to be more interested in), I've been unable to find any relevant verb with costa 'rib' but, for example, there are ...


4

Here's a literal translation: Likewise, the verses composed in praise of Christ by the Presbyter Juvencus. They are sung when they have returned and are approaching the main doors of the church. "Item" probably refers to whatever preceded, i.e. "in the same way as before." "Versi" seems to be the plural of "versus, -ūs" interpreted as 2nd ...


4

The main sentence is Secundo firmamentum caeli in medio libravit aquarum 'On the second day he poised the firmament of the Sky in the middle of the waters Matthew Paris now begins to back-track by inserting an enormous ablative absolute: ipsis aquis creatis 'those same waters having been created (past)' He then elaborates by describing what else ...


4

I think I may have an answer to my own question. Adams in "Social Variation and the Latin Language" says that there were two independent developments - 'au' was pronounced 'o' in certain rustic Latin words during the Classical period but in general 'au' remained the pronunciation, then there was a later development where words from Latin containing 'au' ...


3

Your last three sentences are accurate, but I believe that the words optimo and optatissimo should be understood to be in the dative, being associated with proximum — that is, in the sense of "nearest to the best..." I would translate the first sentence as: He, who designated the way by which it not only can, but even should be attained, says that ...


3

inexquisitum means ‘not having been examined in detail’ (cf. Du Cange. 1884. Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, vol. 3, p. 377 (exquisitus) and 1885, vol. 4, p. 349 (inexquisitus). supramemoratus means 'above-mentioned’.


3

In the general instructions of the Breviarium Romanum I found the verbs ‘munire’ (= defend, protect) and ‘signare’ in the phrases ‘De ratione signo crucis se muniendi’ and ‘Omnes signant se signo crucis’. In addition, Du Cange. 1886. Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, vol. 7. p. 480, has a lemma 'signare', which says: 'signum crucis digitis ac manu ...


3

There seems to be one typo in your sentence: as ("copper coin") almost certainly should be ad ("to"). Corrected in that way, here's a piece-by-piece breakdown of your sentence: Si If liberalitatis nostrae munere by the office of our generosity de beneficiis <a deo nobis> conlatis ...


3

According to Lexico it's origin as a phrase is mid-16th century medicine, and correlates with Wikipedia hinting that it's substituting one thing for another. Merriam-Webster gives a little bit more insight as well. It also gives the first known use as 1582, but doesn't provide a source for what that is. My guess from that is there is probably no classical ...


3

In any sense, the word to use is scintilla, 'spark' (possibly scintillula, though it would probably then be better translated as 'gleam'). Cicero in de Republica 2, 21 has: qui cum famulorum numero educatus ad epulas regis adsisteret, non latuit scintilla ingenii quae iam tum elucebat in puero.


3

Wonderful alphabet; thanks for introducing it. Nothing conclusive; and if you've thought of all this before, apologies. In case it prompts thoughts from others with sharper insights, I offer three thoughts A,B,C. A: belgicat, as you say does not appear in the dictionaries, but belgicas and gallicas are found and they look as if they could come from ...


3

Just to add to Brian's answer:The work in question is the treatise "de facultatibus partium animalium" by the famous medical writer Abū Bakr al-Rāzī (alias Rhazes; 10th century), here appended to the text of his medical encyclopaedia al-Kitāb al-Manṣūrī in the Latin translation by Gerald of Cremona (12th century). This is extant also in the Arabic original. ...


2

Where does belgicare come from? A bit of research turned up this proposed etymology, which, though uncertain, is not unlikely: Latin bēlgicāre, from Greek βήλγει (bēlgei) = to "bleat", from βῆ λέγειν (bē legein), to say "baa". This onomatopoetic origin is suggested by Charles Dufresne DuCange, in his 1840 edition, Glossarium mediae et infirmae ...


2

I've never heard of any special rule for ngi and nge versus gi and ge. The pronunciation of gi and ge with [dʒ] in Ecclesiastical Latin has no major exceptions that I know of. I remember reading about marginal exceptions with [g] for certain words from languages like Hebrew, e.g. Gehenna. But diphthongi is from Greek, and as far as I know [dʒ] is generally ...


2

Varro's Antiquities are probably the most famous example: they were quoted by Priscian (6c) — text in Keil's Grammatici Latini; the "Fasti of Ravenna" were quoted by the Anonymus Valesii, Agnellus (9c), and others (Hodgkin, Italy and Her Invaders, III.178). Cassiodorus had a copy of Seneca's Forma Mundi. Martin of Braga (6c) apparently had two of the younger ...


2

It would be nice if you could give us a little more context. Where did you get this phrase? What book is it from? When was it published? It literally means "At Sext on Thirds and all Doubles". I know what Doubles are, they are a kind of feast with a high liturgical rank. I do not know what Thirds might be. Update: Thanks for the context supplied in your ...


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