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20

Bulls and other papal writings generally do not have a formal name. For convenience, the first few words of the text are often adopted as an informal name. This is the case here. The bull was issued by Pope John XXII on 12 November 1323 and begins with the three words Cum inter nonnullos. (The above-linked text has quum instead of cum but that is a just a ...


14

"Living" is an undertranslation of "ἀθάνατος." "Living" has a straightforward translation from "ζῆν" (to live): the participle "ζῶν"; "ἀθάνατος," however, means "not mortal," as opposed to "not dead." If it simply meant "not dead," then your appeal to the law of excluded middle would be justified. God is living (ζῶν) and immortal (ἀθάνατος). A dog is ...


11

ἀθάνατος means the privative ἀ- (from ἀν- = "not") and θάνατος (death), so strictly etymologically, ἀθάνατος means immortal.


11

Do not only look for “movement” when you see in used with the accusative. In is very versatile and has a lot of meanings that cannot be easily summed up in a few words. A good dictionary will describe them, such as Lewis & Short. Under “II. With acc.” look past letters A (“In space”) and B (“In time”) for C: In other relations, in which an aiming at, ...


10

Short answer: no, athanatos means "immortal", not just "living". Longer answer: compare the English word "immortal". It comes from the Latin in- ("not") + mort- ("death"). So you could argue etymologically that "immortal" should mean "alive" ("not dead"). However, that's not what it means; "immortal" means not just "not dead", but "unable to die". The same ...


9

The prosaic word order in Latin—that is, the ordinary, normal, unremarkable word order—goes like this:       noun modifier The noun comes first, and the modifier comes right after. The modifier can be any of: an adjective, as in canis ruber (a red dog); a noun in the genitive case, as in canis Georgii (George's dog); (rarely) a noun in the same case, as ...


8

I think you are right that sanus more correctly describes a healthy state, whereas saluber/salubris seems to be preferred to describe those things which bestow health. Some examples: Climate: ex saluberrimis Galliae et Hispaniae after the very healthy [climate]* of Gaul and Spain Caesar, Civil War, III.2 *climate is implied because the contrast ...


8

This looks like legitimate Latin, though the transcription is a bit mangled. Here's the corrected transcript Sumelic located in their answer, edited a bit for standardization, along with my translation. (There are a couple words I think might not be right, since they don't make a lot of sense. I've marked those with question marks; if I get a chance to ...


8

Yes, the Spiritus Libertatis (Free Spirit in English) was a doctrine declared to be heretical by the Catholic Church. If you happen to be interested, there is a 1943 text in Latin about this movement: De secta Spiritus Libertatis in Umbria saec. XIV. Disquisitio et documenta by Livario Oliger, available on request here.


6

In my view, there is a subtle difference in meaning. Crucially, note that the adjective propinquus, which expresses a state, selects a dative (e.g., in propinquis urbi montibus (Nep. Han. 5.1)). So the dative nominal associated to the verb appropinquare, which is derived from the adjective propinquus, is used to express the final static position attained by ...


5

The wiktionary tells me for the individual elements that "μή is the negative of thought or wish" Pretty much. It's one of the two common negative elements in Ancient Greek; οὐ(κ) is generally used with indicative verbs, while μή is used with subjunctives and optatives. Μή is also extremely common in conditionals, which will imminently be relevant. and ...


4

Although I cannot read Latin well enough to offer a translation of my own, I can say that it is not gibberish, and I don't see any hidden comedy or jokes in the content of the Latin text. (I think whatever comedy is in the scene is supposed to lie simply in fact that they're using Latin rather than English, and in the pompous and ritualized nature of the ...


4

To give a partial answer: In researching the Trisagion, I came across 14th century commentary by Nicolas Cabasilas, 'A Commentary on the Divine Liturgy'. In this book, he goes as far as to state, "[...] the words 'Strong and immortal God' are those of blessed David, who exclaims 'My soul thirsts for the strong and living God' [...]" (pg. 59, St. Vladimir'...


4

There is a superb (and very long) answer to a related question here. I won't reproduce it here, but some quotes from the post: (question) I am not a native English speaker; I am Italian. I am always puzzled when I hear the expression "quid pro quo" intended as "you scratch my back I scratch yours". In Italy we mean it as "misunderstanding" (from the ...


4

As a basis, I'm going to be taking a line from the Requiem mass: Lux aeterna luceat eis, Domine May eternal light shine upon them, o Lord The "eternal light" here is very literally lux aeterna, and the verb is in the subjunctive, representing a wish or a desire. (Alternatively, you could make it lux perpetua, or use an imperative verb: both of those ...


4

I would translate as follows. I put it in the plural form since it refers to an organization: Praesentes semper, numquam conspecti There are a lot of words that have to do with seeing, but I chose the word conspecti because the infinitive form has the meaning: to attract attention, to be conspicuous, noticed, observed, distinguished, admired Your ...


4

It means you shouldn't do it. My four favorite Latin dictionaries, Lewis and Short, Traupman, Chambers-Murray, and Stelton all let me down on the meaning of non oportet, but I finally found an answer in Woodcock's New Latin Syntax, Number 123. He cites Non te oportebat illi argentum reddere (you ought not to have paid him the money) and, in Livy 5,4,9, non ...


3

In the general instructions of the Breviarium Romanum I found the verbs ‘munire’ (= defend, protect) and ‘signare’ in the phrases ‘De ratione signo crucis se muniendi’ and ‘Omnes signant se signo crucis’. In addition, Du Cange. 1886. Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, vol. 7. p. 480, has a lemma 'signare', which says: 'signum crucis digitis ac manu ...


3

According to Lexico it's origin as a phrase is mid-16th century medicine, and correlates with Wikipedia hinting that it's substituting one thing for another. Merriam-Webster gives a little bit more insight as well. It also gives the first known use as 1582, but doesn't provide a source for what that is. My guess from that is there is probably no classical ...


3

The original latin word for world was 'orbs'. Mundus is a late translation for the greek word 'kosmos'. This greek word conveys the idea of order and order in a greek point of view means the right measure, symetry, harmony and beauty. It was so because the world or the universe was thought in Greece to be that way: orderly constructed, harmonious and ...


3

The transaction's essential things Essentiālia negōtiī transactions' essential things Essentiālia negōtiōrum essential things of the transaction Essentiālia negōtiī essential things of the transactions Essentiālia negōtiōrum negōtia essentiālia trānsāctiōnis "Essential affairs of the transaction" negōtia essentiālia trānsāctiōnum "...


3

EDIT: Note that this answer applies to an earlier version of the question; see the revision history for details. The genitive in (Classical) Latin is, in fact, never accompanied by an article—because Latin has no articles at all! Like in (Ancient) Greek, the Latin genitive is marked by a special ending on nouns and adjectives. This ending varies by ...


3

In Classical Latin: ā Galliā veniō means "I'm coming away/going away from Gaul" or "From Gaul I'm coming to.." dē Galliā veniō means "I'm arriving from Gaul" or "After/From Gaul I'm coming to.." you can also express this more naturally with dē/ā Gallīs veniō The use of venīre in the sense you're after doesn't seem to be listed in OLD. Instead you can use: ...


3

Just based on the meaning of the word, salutaris might be a better choice. I'm not sure if it was ever used that way but it seems to make more sense.


3

I think the first problem here is that there are far more references to gourmandising in the classical sources than to the effects of food on health. Think, for example, of Horace Sat. II, iv passim, and the alleged habit of the Emperor Vitellius of self-induced vomiting to make room for more! More simply, though they possibly had what we commonly call '...


3

It can be useful to consult the relevant commentary made by A. J. Woodman (2018). The Annals of Tacitus (Book IV). Series: Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries (vol. 58). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Here is the relevant quote on page 87: "It is unclear whether paelici is dative of agent (cf. 2.50.3n) or dative of the person concerned (...


2

I found a source suggesting the choice is the astronomical dawn, according to the definition you cite: This book, dated 1958, (FWIW, it was granted a nihil obstat, but I can't find any further assessment of its authority), gives the following definition of dawn, specifically in the context of the celebration of the Eucarist: In canone 821.1 legitur '...


2

To answer the question from the title, after is somewhat more common than before, but both are perfectly acceptable. Most authors choose the order based on what sounds better, or what they want to emphasize. (Putting the adjective first puts more emphasis on it.) To answer the question from the body, though: syntactically, there are no adjectives in this ...


2

Trying to answer the actual title question: This is supposed to be the formal procedure by which a new Master (magister) of Porterhouse claims his right to the post, which Sharpe is trying to make pointedly ridiculous. The title 'Master' is appropriate here : it is simply that adopted for the head of this particular fictional college, where others in real ...


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