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13

I'm guessing it's probably a typographical error. The actual passage comes from chapter 50 (caput L). Originally it might have been spelled "caput l" and somewhere along the way it might have been transposed into "capult." There is no Latin word capult nor is there any abbreviation for it that I can find.


13

Iō is an interjection, defined in Lewis & Short as expressing joy, like English "Hurrah!"; or pain, like English "Oh!"; or hurriedly calling to someone, like English "Come quick!" Some books with the words to Adeste Fideles, like this one, put io in quotes like this: Frederick Oakeley's English translation renders the first ...


12

Accusative of respect: 'He's old/an old man with respect to his hair(s)' – i.e., his hair is that of an old man. Draconis has alluded to this in the other answer, but it's worth making explicit that τὰς φρένας in the last line is the same sort of accusative (whatever name one calls it by): 'He's young in respect to his mind/heart' – i.e., he's young at heart....


11

To add on a bit to cnread's (completely valid) answer: this is a form that's also called the "accusative of body parts" or the "Greek accusative" (since it wasn't common in Latin until Greek-influenced writers started imitating it—even though Greek has a whole bunch of other accusative constructions). It usually specifies a body part that ...


9

The word order that is considered somewhat standard would be: Curia iura novit So, yes, I would say that the word order probably reflects a certain emphasis. This is explained by Thomas K. Arnold: The degree of prominence and emphasis to be given to a word is that which mainly determines its position in the sentence. And: The two emphatic positions in a ...


8

Salve!, and welcome to the site! The translation you point is missing a word or two, but it's not too far from correct. A fairly literal translation is: To see but not [to] be seen Videre and videri are, respectively, the active and passive infinitives of the verb for seein, hence: to see and to be seen. Sed is an adversative conjunction, but. Non is an ...


8

It's an indirect question following the interrogative ut, which takes the subjunctive: Surely you see how... For ut used in this way, see its Lewis & Short entry.


7

None of the first 5 words in your passage is in the ablative case. As you note, scanning the line will reveal this fact. Aurea is an adjective ('golden'/'[made] of gold'), not a noun ('gold'), and modifies aetas. Sata est is passive, not active; so the first translation that you gave doesn't work at all (unless you meant to write 'was planted' instead of ...


6

No: minutim is an adverb derived from the past participle minutus (from minuo) plus the suffix -im, used to form adverbs with a distributive meaning often derived from past participles (such as cursim or festinatim) While the adjectival participle minutus can mean 'minute', 'slender', 'thin', 'small', 'short', the adverb minutim can mean 'a little at a time',...


6

You should note that your text and the Loeb don't match up. Shackleton Bailey's (i.e. the Loeb's) text reads perfectioris, and Kempf (in the Teubner and reproduced on Perseus) opts for fortioris, "stronger." Valerius Maximus is most likely alluding to the fact that Aeschylus is considered to have substantially changed tragedy into its common form. ...


5

The abbreviation A.DC. behind the name stands for the botanist Alphonse de Candolle, who introduced this name. (Famous botanists who created lots of scientific names usually get cited with an abbreviation, which is actually a great honour. Lists for decoding the abbreviations are easily found, e.g. on Wikipedia.) He is probably the best person to ask what it ...


5

It looks like the ritualistic exclamation, much like in io Saturnalia, the line is translated as "Sing choir of angels" but the Latin says "Now let the chorus of angels sing" so it seems to be little more than filler. The only other explanation (and this would be a stretch) is that it is a weird spelling of eo dative of is/ea/id, i.e. ...


4

(Please ignore my previous answer; it's incorrect.) As fdb mentions, this is a Semitic idiom. But in fact it goes back farther than that—it's an Afro-Asiatic idiom, so we also see it in e.g. Egyptian. Afro-Asiatic, as best I can tell, had no comparative or superlative morphology ("bigger", "biggest"). So the standard way to express a ...


4

I agree with @aper's answer, and would like to add some more color. To get a general sense and feeling of the difference between animus and anima, one can consult my Collocation Tool to see what words are usually paired with animus and anima. under animus we can see words like aequus, moveo, magnitudo, magnus, bonus, fortis, induco, pertubo, rubor, dolor, ...


4

This is just a follow-up post to Sebastian's answer, which is correct for Classical Latin. It could be useful to add that the expression a contrario (often used as part of argumentum a contrario) comes from scholastic Latin. The expression a contrario is typically used in Romance-speaking countries, in English-speaking countries, in Slavic-speaking countries,...


3

I think it could be a peculiar type of cause, such as causa efficiens, causa materialis, etc, philosophical concepts from Aristotle, widespread in medieval philosophy and theology. See this passage from Barclay's Apology (1676): Prior est causa procurans et efficiens, secunda causa formalis. — 7, 4. p. 129. Obedientia et passio Ch. illud est, quo anima ...


3

Although I didn't specify in my question, my interest in this has more to do with post-medievel Latin rather than classical. Concerning classical Latin, both Charles Short and Henry Nettleship quote Horace, which is the same quote given in Mitomino's answer. The main idea is adjuncta aevo, i.e. qualities which accompany a certain age. Whether that is better ...


3

Ex diariis is correct, although diarium usually means "daily ration/allowance" and seems to have been used in the sense of a "diary" only rarely. A more classical expression for "diary, journal" may be commentarii diurni (daily notebook), so you could say: ex commentariis diurnis (or diurnis commentariis, whichever you prefer).


3

It means "that." The basic structure of the sentence is: Scire cupis quid sit quod nemo tibi libenter occurrit? You want to know why it is that nobody meets with you gladly? In the phrase est, quod the quod does not translate to a specific English word; it depends on how you render the whole thing in English, e.g. hoc est, quod ad vos venio, &...


2

sententia is something you've given thought to and which relates to a given situation, a view; from this follow its uses as "thought expressed in words", "sense, sentence", "intention", "decision, judicial sentence", "moral maxim". meā quidem sententiā ('at least in my view') ex sententiā; praeter animī ...


2

There is already an excellent answer, but perhaps a different suggestion might still be welcome? You could also phrase it as adsumus semper, numquam spectamur — we are always present, we are never observed. adsum has the connotation of being helpful, which might be a nice touch.


2

I'm going to enjoy necroposting on this. The only definitive way to tell what this word means is to look at usage. The word ἀθάνατος in Greek is both an adjective and a noun. As an adjective, it means immortal, of immortal fame, or imperishable. As a noun, it means an immortal. It means these things simply because that's the way it has been used and ...


2

Contrary to what several respondents have written, θάνατος does not mean “dead” and ἀθάνατος does not mean “non-dead” or “un-dead”. Θάνατος is a noun and means “death”. ἀθάνατος is an exocentric compound (bahuvrihi) and means literally “whose death is not”, or “not having a death”, thus not merely “living”, but “incapable of dying”.


2

I think the meaning of γέγονεν (3rd singular perfect of γίγνομαι) is 'has become' here, as @brianpck says, but to achieve good English usage we can use 'is now' to express the change in state, thus: He who comes after me is now before me, because he is foremost. In answer to @ktm5124 about the change of tenses, I think that reported speech ("I said that ...


1

In your second citation Iudaei vero et Iudas ut causa procurans it seems to me the meaning is something akin to "executive power" (this is of course wrong historically and terrible theology, but the author of the text presumably understands it that way, along with a fairly substantial number of people in history and, I'm afraid, present). Something ...


1

Well, I don't find Whitaker's definition so surprising. First of all, note that attribuere and adiungere can be synonymous: e.g., 'to add/adjoin to'. As for your question, adiuncta can be interpreted as a characteristic, but not necessarily permanent, set of attributes. Perhaps the existence of examples like the following one motivated the part of Whitaker's ...


1

The words are generally suitable. virtus can indeed mean strength of character, body and mind, amor is indeed love, and fortitudo can mean courage. However, you are right that virtus and fortitudo overlap more than the corresponding English words strength and courage do. If you want a word meaning only courage, you could use audacia, but be aware that this ...


1

It’s a military saying ( videre sed non videri ) see but not be seen it used but Recce and sniper teams and any other covert observation platoons


1

The phrases used in Scholastic latin to convey something like "bear in mind", "take note" et sim. are e.g. the following (in late Latin freely with "quod" rather than acc+inf): Adverte... (as in: "Adverte tamen..." "But note that..." Advertendum est... ("One should be aware that..." Nota... ("...


1

In the sense of “In my opinion...” both are perfectly fine and in practice synonymous. My impression is that Meā (quidem) sententiā... is used more frequently by Latin speakers today, possibly reflecting usage in standard sources, but I have seen meā opinione also (apparently ex or dē meā opinione is another option).


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