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10 votes
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'Conclusio sequitur ex premissis' or 'sequitur conclusio ex premissis'?

I give some real examples taken from medieval latin: ex his praemissis haec sequitur conclusio (Saint Lawrence of Brindisi) sequitur ex praemissis ista conclusio (Ockham) haec / ista conclusio ...
  • 2,866
8 votes
Accepted

Phrasing "it remains to"

The impersonal verb superest is regularly used for 'it remains (to)'/'all that remains is (to)': either superest ut + subjunctive, or quod superest. superest ut ad extremas partes corporis ueniam, ...
  • 18k
8 votes

Caeteris paribus

The third part of Descartes's Principia Philosophiae (pg. 78 of this edition) contains a more literal translation of "all things unchanged": Si autem caeteris immutatis, contingat ut minuatur illa ...
  • 36.9k
7 votes
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The logical "then"

Option 1: sequitur, ut Browsing L&S I came to the entry on the verb sequor, meaning II.B.4, that reads: In logical conclusions, to follow, ensue; with subject-clause, especially with ut. And ...
  • 10.6k
6 votes

How do you translate “the principle of explosion” into Latin?

First off, the actual principle was usually called ex falso quodlibet or ex contradictione quodlibet in Latin philosophy literature. That said, if you want a literal translation of "principle of ...
6 votes
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Translating "Contra principia negantem non est disputandum"

My background studying medieval scholastic Philosophy leads me to translate principia with the somewhat redundant phrase "first principles." The phrase is common in Scholastic philosophy (...
  • 36.9k
5 votes

Phrasing "it remains to"

Why not simply say restat demonstrare, or restat ut demonstremus? It was good enough for Cicero, e.g. restat ut summa negligentia tibi obstiterit. (Quint. XII, end). In more recent Latin, you might ...
  • 17.6k
5 votes
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Modus Barbara, Modus Celarent, et Modus Darii: (Modi Barbara, Celarent, et Darii)?

For those unfamiliar with this terminology, this question refers to medieval mnemonic names for syllogisms, mostly drawn from Aristotelian logic. All valid syllogisms, along with their names, are ...
  • 36.9k
4 votes

The logical "then"

I think it is worth mentioning in this context that a modern notation like p ⇒ q which we read in English either as p implies q or if p then q, can be read in Latin as ex p, (sequitur) q with an ...
  • 2,926
4 votes

"Argumentum ad" vs. "argumentum a"

Here are two apparent counterexamples that I think are not really counterexamples. I post them here to give people an opportunity to confirm or refute my understanding of them (I'll be grateful for ...
  • 14.9k
4 votes
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Is it correct to say, "Additionem in prima, secunda, et tertia syllogismi"?

Given that syllogismus is masculine, and to indicate anything over which you exercise an activity you have to use in + ablative, if I have correctly understand what you mean, the correctly translation ...
  • 2,866
3 votes
Accepted

Ergo, ex nihilo aliquid et ex nihilo nihil fit

Your translation is correct and proper.
  • 41.5k
3 votes

Quando "a fortiori" ortum est?

Auctor libri qui inscribitur Dizionario Storico-Giuridico Romano nos refert ad philosophos medii aevi, Latham, Wordlist, s. v. 'a, ab' annos indicat 'c. 1337, c. 1343' sine auctorum indicatione. ...
3 votes

Does "a priori" have an implied substantive?

Here are some scattered observations, which may or may not constitute an answer. I found1 no classical examples of a priori, but several examples of a priore2, most followed by an ablative noun. ...
3 votes

How do you translate “the principle of explosion” into Latin?

“The principle of explosion” is a modern metaphor. In the time when Latin had a significant population of native speakers, nobody would have used it. In any way you decide to express it in Latin, you ...
  • 2,926
2 votes

Ergo, ex nihilo aliquid et ex nihilo nihil fit

Your translation is fine, but a Roman may have preferred to express the shared prepositional phrase only once, perhaps like this: Ex nihilo igitur fiunt et aliquid et nihil.
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