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Why Is This Noun in the Singular?

It is because cunae, -arum, f, is the word for a single crib. The singular cuna is never used. This is similar to how castra is a single camp. Such a word is called a plurale tantum (plural: pluralia ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
11 votes
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Why is accusative pronoun "te" used in this construction?

These two sentences involve different analyses, which can be shown by using the following test: replacement of the infinitive (clause) by the neuter pronoun hoc. In the first example the infinitival ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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11 votes
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Why "quod" and not "quo" is used here?

A relative pronoun agrees with its antecedent in gender and number. Its case is determined by its role in the relative clause. In this case, quod agrees with ferrum in gender (neuter) and number (...
brianpck's user avatar
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10 votes
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What is the difference between "in umerīs" and "in umerōs"?

In + ablative means "in/on something" while doing the verb. In + accusative means "into/onto something", i.e. the verb involves moving/transferring something else into/onto the ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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10 votes
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Quid iuvat deōs precāri ut rēs āmissae tibi reddantur?

Quid iuvat? is a bit of a set phrase meaning 'what's the point?', 'what good does it do?' or, more literally, 'what does it help?'. The matter in question being deos precari 'to pray to the gods' (...
consistebat's user avatar
10 votes
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Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

Domino is dative, not ablative. English has the same idiom: 'known to the master.'
cnread's user avatar
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10 votes
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Why is the imperfect tense used here instead of the present tense?

Sometimes, the imperfect (and perhaps even the perfect) indicative can be used for a subjunctive. It can then express an irrealis, like here: "it would be better that I died than to live without ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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9 votes
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"neuter e duobus pueris" vs "neuter puer"

Yes, it is equivalent in meaning to "Neuter puer jam dormit." As pointed out by the comments, duobus is redundant, since neuter means "neither" (of two). Note that the fact that a ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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9 votes
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What's the role of the pronoun "iis" in this context?

This is often called the Dative of the Person Judging (aka Dativus iudicantis; cf. also the "Dative of Relation": e.g. see this link), which is sometimes considered as a specific case of the ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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9 votes
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What's the meaning of "paulum satis" in this sentence?

Paulum alone is the subject here. A little is (est) enough (satis) for a good life (ad beate vivendum).
consistebat's user avatar
8 votes
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Why "suam" and not "eius" is used in this sentence?

The idea that suus is used when the possessor is the subject is a simplification for beginners. It can be used in a variety of other contexts, generally with a sense along the lines of "her/his ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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8 votes
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lūna 'nova' esse dīcitur

In this case, lūna is not only the subject of the infinitive "esse": it's the subject of the entire phrase "'nova' esse dīcitur". That is, the structure of this clause is parallel ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why does the conjugation of Ēsse (Edere) vary dictionary-wise?

As Sebastian notes, Cactus2000 gives you nonsense. It looks to be poor programming, or maybe a misunderstanding of the data taken from elsewhere. Wiktionary is correct, but it also provides a few ...
cmw's user avatar
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8 votes
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Grammatical number agreement in this sentence

In this sentence, "dies mensis primus" is one noun phrase, serving as the sentence's subject ("the first day of the month"), "nominatur" is the verb, and "kalendae&...
Agnes's user avatar
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8 votes

Mysterious use of accusative instead of nominative in " delphīnus, cantū allectus, repente hominem natantem subiit eumque in dorsō suō..."

You seem to be under the impression that subire and vehere mean “to ride.” In reality, neither means anything of the sort, so that is probably where your confusion arises. Subire means “to go under,” ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
8 votes
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LLPSI: Ch. 13, Ln. 120, 'Hōc annī tempore...'

Hoc...tempore is known as an ablative of time: Time when, or within which, is expressed by the ablative... cōnstitūtā diē on the appointed day prīmā lūce at daybreak quotā hōrā? at what hour? tertiā ...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes
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Does the AcI permit the use of adjectives?

Short Answer: Yes, hostem armatum is part of the AcI. In AcI/Indirect Statements, the subject of the infinitive is in the accusative. In this case, hostem is the subject, not miles. Miles instead is ...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes
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Syntax of sentences with the verb "pudet"

As you have seen, the syntax of pudet-type verbs is not an easy topic. Here I will limit myself to answering the questions you have included in your post: (In the example) "Nōnne tē pudet hoc ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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7 votes

What's the grammatical role of "mille passus" in this sentence?

Mille passus a fine imperii is an adverbial phrase modifying habitat. Habitat is used intransitively in this sentence. Mille passus is in the accusative because that's generally the case used to ...
consistebat's user avatar
7 votes
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Why feminine is used in "haec locuta"?

Locuta doesn't go with haec, but rather with Ariadna. Locuta is singular, but haec here is neuter plural. "Ariadne, having said (locuta, fem. sing. nom.) these things (haec, neut. plur. acc.), ...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes

Quid iuvat deōs precāri ut rēs āmissae tibi reddantur?

I agree with consistebat's answer. Since I see that you are also interested in the syntax (cf. "I don't have a clear idea about what is supposed to be the subject"), here are some comments ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why is this indirect command not expressed with "ut" + subjunctive?

iubeo is generally followed by accusative of the person ordered and an infinitive for the order itself, whereas impero is usually followed the dative of the person ordered plus by ut + subjunctive for ...
Acervus's user avatar
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7 votes
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LLPSI: Ch. 14, Ln. 38, "et oculōs aperiēns..."

Aperiēns is an active present participle, which is a verb form that can take a direct object. Aperiēns and oculōs go together, but not by means of aperiēns modifying the noun; the noun is the direct ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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6 votes
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Why "ipse hic" is used here and not "ipse tu"?

The pronoun ipse refers to the implicit pronoun tu. While ipse can be used with personal or other pronouns like you list, it is also often used on its own even when referring to actors that are ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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Usage of pronouns in chapter VIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata

"Is servus" is not an error. Latin "pronouns"* don't work like English pronouns. Is can be used by itself, but it can also be used adjectivally with a noun. The same goes for ille, ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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5 votes
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What does "vestem scindebat" mean?

The whole sentence is not particularly long and goes like this: Ariadna igitur in litus descendit atque huc et illuc currens multis cum lacrimis capillum et vestem scindebat, ut homines qui maerent ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes
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Do we use "satis multum" + genitive to convey "a sufficient amount of"?

Yes, satis multum aquae means “enough water” or “a sufficient amount of water” (you cannot say “enough amount” in English because “enough” is an adverb). This is not even a particularly fixed ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes
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Is this construction "accusativus cum infinitivo"?

This is not ACI. In an ACI the infinitive is often (a part of) the object, whereas here it is the subject. An ACI comes with a dominant structure saying something to the effect of "I know that&...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
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Mysterious use of accusative instead of nominative in " delphīnus, cantū allectus, repente hominem natantem subiit eumque in dorsō suō..."

I think the confusion can be resolved by diving into the verbs meaning and usage. subeo: it might be helpful to keep in mind that the prefix sub- *sometimes* means the direction from which the action ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes
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What's the role of "atque" in this sentence?

Yes, the sentence should end with a question mark. Maybe Ørberg is playing a little loose with punctuation. The role of atque does not seem particularly mysterious to me: tantus atque tam pulcher ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar

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