Skip to main content
15 votes

Latin ligature "qz"?

I would say that is a common abbreviation for "-que". Maybe you could find useful Cappelli's Dizionario di Abbreviature latine (a very detailed repertory of latin abbreviations). Take a look here. ...
qwertxyz's user avatar
  • 2,906
11 votes
Accepted

Use of ß (“eszett”) in Latin text

The modern German roman-type ß was developed at the end of the 19th century as an analogue of the blackletter ß, which was a ligature of ſ and z (which is reflected in its name) that had slowly ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 1,174
7 votes

Latin ligature "qz"?

It must be que. The conjunction -que is very common in Latin, and it is no surprise it has it's own symbol. For example suumque is (almost) the same as et suum and means "and his own". The excerpt you ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes

Abbreviation I haven’t seen before

This appears to be an excerpt from the Alphonsine tables (Tabulae astronomicae Alphonsinae), found in particular on p. 70 of the 1483 edition by Erhard Ratdolt in Venice. I think it helps to consider ...
njuffa's user avatar
  • 478
4 votes

Abbreviation I haven’t seen before

I have found the answer to my question! It is a long s with a diagonal stroke, ẜ, unicode 1e9c. It is mentioned (without saying what it stands for) on Wikipedia at Scribal abbreviation; the last image ...
Pierre Paquette's user avatar
4 votes

Latin ligature "qz"?

q + U+0301 (combining acute accent) + U+A76B (et sign) using hlig on all three characters will give you: This combination will appear in Junicode Two (github.com/psb1558/Junicode-font).
Daniel Hinostroza's user avatar
3 votes

Latin ligature "qz"?

For me this is the Unicode Private Use Area character U+E8BF LATIN SMALL LETTER Q LIGATED WITH FINAL ET defined by a Medieval Unicode Font Initiative recommendation, however the diacritical mark ...
Janusz S. Bień's user avatar
2 votes

Abbreviation I haven’t seen before

Right, secundum. See Capelli, p.14
jdp's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Is it possible to have a single Latin ligature be majuscule and minuscule?

Here is a partial answer. I don't know what kind of forms you can find in historical (e.g. medieval) documents. In normal current typographic practice, no In Latin texts that have been published in ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
2 votes

How to indicate a diphthong?

It isn’t traditionally used in normal writing, but the inverted double-wide breve has been a common way of unambiguously indicating diphthongs when discussing pronunciation (e.g. in discussions of ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
1 vote

How to indicate a diphthong?

If you want to create an unambiguous pronunciation guide to a text, you need a preface where you explain your conventions. A reasonable convention might include, for example, that ae and au are ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote

How to indicate a diphthong?

Most of them don't need to be marked, since they're completely predictable. For example, ui is only a diphthong in a small number of grammatical words; everywhere else, it's two separate syllables. ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.1k
1 vote

What diphthongs are available are Unicode ligatures?

As far as I'm aware, there are no ligatures for ei, ui, or eu in Unicode. In general, Unicode only provides codepoints for ligatures when they're commonly-used and have semantic meaning. In Old ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.1k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible