16 votes
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Mathematical Latin Help

I understand "ut quotiens sit integer complexus" as "in such a way that the quotient is a complex integer" (presumably what we now call a Gaussian integer). Si numerus complexus ...
Anserin's user avatar
  • 174
15 votes

Why is it "id est" instead of "illud est" if it often means "that is"?

Translation between two languages is rarely as easy as swapping each word for its equivalent in the other language. Function words in particular, for example demonstratives like id and illud (and hoc, ...
consistebat's user avatar
12 votes

How can I properly translate possessive form of nouns?

In general, don't focus on every word having an equivalent in the other language. For example, the single word magistrō would generally be translated into multiple words like "to the master"....
Draconis's user avatar
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12 votes
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"ejus" versus "eius"

In antiquity, there was no letter J in Latin alphabet. Letter I was used for both vowel /i/ and consonant /i̯/ (alternative notation: /j/). Letter J was invented in late Middle Ages. Classical ...
Arfrever's user avatar
  • 556
12 votes
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Translation of “in” as “and”

The passage comes from Cic. Fam. 9.4, namely from a letter to Varro. Apparently others have translated as you would expect: If you have a garden in your library, everything will be complete (...
Rafael's user avatar
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11 votes

Moonfleet latin idiom

The version in lusu alae is quite widespread on the Internet, but it is obviously incorrect (as cnread writes in a comment, that would be a form of ala, “wing”) and not authentic. In Meade Falkner's ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
11 votes
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How can I say "yeah!" in Latin?

One such interjection might be Eia! which one online Latin dictionary shows as eiă interjection. This word is an invariable part of speech (of joy) how now!, Ha, Good, see! (of urgency or ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
11 votes
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Transcribing and translating the passage read by Thomas More in Wolf Hall

This is from the New Testament of the Bible, 2 Peter 2. Translation from the 1611 KJV: But there were false prophets also among the people, euen as there shall bee false teachers among you, who ...
njuffa's user avatar
  • 478
10 votes

Passive infinive with accusative

In English, we often say "are found" to mean "there exist", as in "52 species of gastropod are found in Virginia." This phrasing casts the fact epistemologically, ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 15.9k
10 votes

"ejus" versus "eius"

To add a bit more context: The Latin alphabet is pretty well-suited for Latin, all things considered. It was adapted in antiquity to fit the phonology of the language, with new letters like G and Y ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67k
10 votes
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What does "Potochoterophii Fohsiensis" possibly mean in a Latin cryptogram from "Cocker's Decimal Arithmetic" textbook?

The text is corrupt: the first word is meant to be Ptochotrophii, as reflected in e.g. this transcription from an encyclopedia from 1837. Ptochotrophium is a variant of ptochotropheum, which is a ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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10 votes
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John Owen's poem: Umquam or numquam?

It seems plausible that Latin version you quoted is corrupt and the original had numquam, in which case "numquam rediturus ad ortum" would refer to the fact that the sun's course in the sky ...
Asteroides's user avatar
9 votes
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Meaning of a present participle in a verse of Vergil's Eclogue 8

It is a typical feature of Latin that participles are used instead of finite verbs, even where we would not expect that in our own languages, or it would sound stilted. This is frequently encountered ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
9 votes

Why would an accusative become the subject in Tacitus, Annales 1.28?

The subject is fors ("luck") and the object is noctem ("night"). If you just take the subject, the object and the predicate, you get: Noctem fors lenivit. Luck alleviated the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes

Translation request: DEVM ⋅ DELECTARE ⋅ DEI ⋅ LAVDES ⋅ DECORARE ⋅

Laudes can be the direct object of decorare: "to adorn the praises of god." As it's given, there is no subject, just two infinitives and their objects (and the genitive of the second object)....
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
8 votes

Vita Bene Vixit in a commemorative magazine

Verbatim, vita bene victa 'a life well lived'. Some possible issues: Victa can mean either 'lived' or 'conquered'. That said, it seems to me that context makes it obvious which is intended. The so-...
gaufridus's user avatar
  • 156
8 votes
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"M. Cato Censorius, quem tam e re publica fuit nasci quam Scipionem"

I see two main difficulties here. Special Meaning of ex (1) First, Seneca is using a special sense of the preposition e(x). In the Lewis & Short entry for ex you can find the following meaning ...
brianpck's user avatar
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7 votes
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What is the correct translation of "Venetiarum" in this context?

The Latin name for Venice is Venetiae, -arum, f., so Venetiarum simply means "of Venice." The purpose of this addition is probably to distinguish the place from others of the same name; in ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
6 votes
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Use of 'suus' in 'ignoranti quem portum petat nullus suus ventus est'

While not its most common usage, suus can also mean something like proprius: "their own" as opposed to anyone else's. This is meaning II.B and II.C in Lewis and Short and was especially ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
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"Non splendeat toga, ne sordeat quidem"

This would fit under definition 6.b for nē in OLD: not...either, neither. Therefore, 'Your toga should not be bright (but) not dingy either.' In fact, the OLD entry cites this passage. Others that ...
cnread's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the role of "ipso" in this quote from Cicero?

A couple of miscellaneous points, some iterated from my comments: You used more words to ask your question than strictly logically necessary. Why did you do that? Cicero doesn't use the bare minimum ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

Vita Bene Vixit in a commemorative magazine

It's a bit tricky to get this succinctly in English, but it essentially means "a/the life is dead (but when it was alive, it had lived well." You can see this doesn't make any sense. The ...
cmw's user avatar
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6 votes
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Can 'superiore' mean 'previous years' (plural)?

No, superiore is clearly singular, anno superiore is a standing expression meaning “the previous year,” and it is unheard of to use the singular annus for several years.
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
6 votes
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"Claudius pullos sacros in aquam mersit ut biberent, quoniam esse nollent"

There is no mysteriously obscure grammar at play here, but rather the infinitive esse from the verb edo 'I eat'. He made the chickens drink, because they didn't want to eat.
consistebat's user avatar
6 votes

"Infandum me jubes Regina renovare dolorem" -- Translation

Is the "translate" you mention Google Translate? If so, note that it's horribly inaccurate. That's but one link of several that demonstrate how inept that software is with Latin (and truth ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54.6k
5 votes

Isn't requiescat actually subjunctive?

No, because donec meaning 'until' may take the subjunctive. Compare eg. French jusqu'à ce qu'il vienne 'until he comes (subj.)'. The logic is that an event that one wishes or expects to occur is not a ...
consistebat's user avatar
5 votes
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"minae quibus usque ad mortem timeri parum est."

The adverb parum with est means 'it is too little, is not enough, does not suffice'. Parum is then the subject complement (the predicate) of the relative clause introduced by the dative pronoun quibus,...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,901
5 votes
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"interim multos habes quorum scripta nescio an satis ordinentur."

You seem to have stumbled upon a particularly controversial locus, and several versions of the Latin, as well as different translations can be found. Here is D. J. W. Olshausen's German translation, ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes

Can we use the infinitive instead of supine with verbs of motion?

Not really in Classical prose, but it is sometimes found in poetry and later/popular Latin. I.e. it's not a "proper" construction according the grammars, but it can be found. When did the ...
Alexandre's user avatar
  • 481
5 votes

Translation from Latin to English of "NON ANGLORUM"

The -orum ending denotes a plural genitive ending, hence: Not of the [many] English Note that, as Sebastian suggests in the comments, this is not a complete sentence. So for a safer translation we ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k

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