14

tomus primus = "volume one".


10

This comes from Jeremiah 2:24, and I think it helps to understand that in the original Hebrew text, the word שָׁאֲפָ֣ה (šā·’ă·p̄āh) appears. According to Strong's Exaustive Concordance, this word means: desire earnestly, devour, haste, pant, snuff up, swallow up A primitive root; to inhale eagerly; figuratively, to cover; by implication, to be ...


9

Hoc (here hoc is simply 'this.') opusculum This little work, , quamdiu vixero, for as long as I shall live, doctioribus (here dative after offero) to those more learned emendandum offero I offer for [their] correction. What a generous dedication. Can it possibly be recent?


8

This looks like legitimate Latin, though the transcription is a bit mangled. Here's the corrected transcript Sumelic located in their answer, edited a bit for standardization, along with my translation. (There are a couple words I think might not be right, since they don't make a lot of sense. I've marked those with question marks; if I get a chance to ...


8

I agree with Sebastian Koppehel and the other commenters regarding most of their general comments, but I think that everyone may be overlooking the possibility that the ut clause might be taken as a result clause subordinated to the qui clause. Then annon can be read as introducing an indirect question subordinated to videat. A somewhat literal ...


7

It is accusative plural, agreeing with res. "We have donated to the monastery which is called H. certain things (that were part) of our property".


7

With some help from this description, which contains a few errors, here's what I think it says: Templum hoc r[e]novatum est [l]ateribus denuo et integre regnante serenissimo do[mi]no do[mi]no principe Georgio Rakoci Anno do[mini] 1640 My translation: This temple [i.e. church] was completely and newly renovated with bricks during the reign of ...


6

The full sentence, which includes scribal abbreviations, is somewhat different. Here is a transcription of the whole thing, with emendations and additions in bold: Alia vero multo luculentius eum quid est nobis ostendunt, nempe formicae, apes, fibri, canis, milleque huius generis industria sibi ingenita creatoris sapientiam, quamquam muta, praedicare ...


6

Like fdb said, it should be 'profitentes' instead of 'profites'. Nicolaus Cusanus cited Ketton's translation like this: "Profitentes etiam se suae caedis authores cordibus suis non minimam ambiguitatem inde gerunt, [sed eum nullatenus interfecerunt]" (https://books.google.nl/books?id=mQ-KDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA46). Translation by Hagemann and Glei: "Selbst wenn ...


6

Here's some context: Seemingly nothing much had been done in the matter of Daffodil. And the Chief Constable, who had hard-worked officers to protect, was pretty stiff with Caroline. Not at first: I gather he tried heading her off by explaining some of the jobs he had on hand, and letting her in on a harmless wartime secret or two. But Caroline, who is ...


6

Those words are a Christian formula closely associated with St. Benedict and the Benedictine order. It is meant to fend off the devil and his temptations, and the translation is as follows: May the holy cross be my light May not the serpent be my guide Move back, Satan, Never promote your vanities to me What you pour out is evil, Drink your poison yourself. ...


5

I'm only an intermediate student of Latin, but I think I'll learn a lot by translating this. Here's what I came up with. In the time since Pope Clement XIII permitted several Churches to celebrate the Feast in honor of the Most Holy Heart of Jesus together with its Office and Mass, the faithful peoples everywhere have felt themselves awakened by such ...


5

Luculentius is the comparative form of luculentus, either as a neuter adjective, or as an adverb, brighter, more respectable, more brightly or more respectably. Regarding nēpe, the bar here seems to mean a nasal consonant following. If so, it would read nempe, certainly (more or less a synonym of vero, a style resource, not really needed in the translation, ...


5

The missing neutral noun is praestari. Infinitives can act as nouns. They are neutral and undeclinable. They are often objects but can also be subjects: Errare humanum est. To err is human. When they are the subject, they rarely have a subject. But it is possible, and in that case, their subject is in the accusative. Te venire pergratum est. Your coming ...


5

I'm afraid I don't have good news for you. In Latin one can only use meaning & context to know if the adjective/participle is used "dominantly" (NB: for a relevant terminological remark, please see TKR's comment above). Note that your first example is ambiguous between a predicative/"dominant" reading ('the highest point of heaven') and an attributive ...


5

In addition to Mitomino's excellent answer, I would just like to note that partitive use of adjectives exists in English too and is no less ambiguous than in Latin. OK, we do not say “the top mountain” in English. But we do say: the southern United States (really: the southern part) the late twentieth century (really: the late part) the lowest ebb (really: ...


5

To see what nuances a Latin word has, a list of translations to another language like English is not quite enough. Examples, descriptions, and explanations help get a better picture. The link you give is better than a mere list, but the entry in this online version of the dictionary by Lewis and Short is even better. The phrase para bellum can be well ...


4

Although I cannot read Latin well enough to offer a translation of my own, I can say that it is not gibberish, and I don't see any hidden comedy or jokes in the content of the Latin text. (I think whatever comedy is in the scene is supposed to lie simply in fact that they're using Latin rather than English, and in the pompous and ritualized nature of the ...


4

(Nice timing! I just read this passage a week ago…) This is from the opening to the War with Catiline. Igitur de Catilinae conjuratione quam verissume potero paucis absolvam; nam id facinus inprimis ego memorabile existumo sceleris atque periculi novitate. Therefore, I'll give a short summary of the conspiracy of Catiline, as truthfully as possible—as I, ...


4

You are right, it is Sanctae Romanae Ecclesiae. For consistency with the current text, you might want to use ligatures instead of separate letters for the diphthong ae: Sanctæ Romanæ Ecclesiæ. FWIW, the technical name for the analogue of conjugation when applied to endings of nouns (i.e., when nouns change ending according to grammatical function) is ...


4

In the Czech Republic there are many diplomas issued in Latin (definitely the largest Charles University does so) and hence official translation services are available. The services do include translations into English and German, because that's what Czechs need the translations for, the Latin original is normally accepted here just fine. For example: ...


4

Eō here is the ablative singular masculine of is, ea, id, "he/she/it". The other important thing to note is that the verb is passive—in other words, the subject in the nominative is the thing being seen, and the person doing the seeing can be in the ablative with ā/ab. So in the nominative, the murī Rōmānī et porta Capena are being seen; ab eō refers back ...


4

It is a somewhat confusing sentence! Hint: what other translation of ab do you know? Second hint: what is the ending in videntur, and how do you translate it? P.S. I think your Roman should be Romam?


4

You have the cum clause pretty well figured out, so I'll skip that. The citizens asked him (ab eo petiverunt) for something. What was that thing? Instead of supplying some noun as the direct object of petiverunt, Livy provides a noun clause (jussive noun clause) that gives the substance of the request, ut sibi permitteretur: they want something to be ...


4

Without knowing the context, here's my best shot at a literal translation: The unspoken resolution of a dispute which the desire to surpass had brought about at [their] arrival. Some notes: The whole phrase is just a noun that seems to be explaining what preceded it. The only verb is the relative clause. decisio controversiae occurs a few other times ...


4

The main sentence is Secundo firmamentum caeli in medio libravit aquarum 'On the second day he poised the firmament of the Sky in the middle of the waters Matthew Paris now begins to back-track by inserting an enormous ablative absolute: ipsis aquis creatis 'those same waters having been created (past)' He then elaborates by describing what else ...


4

No, that does not explain the subjunctive, because no reason or explanatory fact is introduced by the quod. Therefore Allen & Greenough's § 592 does not apply. Please note that the section you quoted refers to § 540, which begins thus: The Causal particles quod and quia … But quod is not a causal particle here. It does not mean “because.” A simple ...


4

Presumably you have looked at this: وَقَوۡلِهِمۡ إِنَّا قَتَلۡنَا ٱلۡمَسِيحَ عِيسَى ٱبۡنَ مَرۡيَمَ رَسُولَ ٱللَّهِ وَمَا قَتَلُوهُ وَمَا صَلَبُوهُ وَلَـٰكِن شُبِّهَ لَهُمۡ‌ۚ وَإِنَّ ٱلَّذِينَ ٱخۡتَلَفُواْ فِيهِ لَفِى شَكٍّ۬ مِّنۡهُ‌ۚ مَا لَهُم بِهِۦ مِنۡ عِلۡمٍ إِلَّا ٱتِّبَاعَ ٱلظَّنِّ‌ۚ وَمَا قَتَلُوهُ يَقِينَۢا “profites” does not make any sense to me. ...


4

"Possibile & aequissimum erat" is an impersonal sentence, which can be translated in English as "it was possible and most fair", but which needs no such pronoun in Latin. What was 'possible and most fair' is here expressed as an accusative-infinitive, with quam (indeed referring back to legem) and praestari. So "... legem posuit, quam praestari ... ...


4

Asphodelus -i (m) appears to be a kind of lily that the Greeks closely associated with death. Specifically, in Greek and English literary use, it references the Elysian meadows (the good place where fallen Heroes go). I'm not an expert on this subject-- this is where I got the information: https://www.etymonline.com/word/asphodel. It appears to be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible