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1

Take a look at wiktionary's page for the word: it's īre, eō, īs...eunt...iē̆runt with an inter- stuck to its face. It shares one form with with the ē-conjugation by a pure accident, and in that form -ō is the ending and e- < ei- is the stem (as in ī-re < ei-re) with no thematic vowel (the -ē- of habē-ō/s/t... which breaks/shortens if another vowel or ...


9

Intereō is a compound, inter-eō; the second part is the famous irregular verb eō, īre, ivī/iī, itus. As such, it conjugates like eō does: inter-eō, inter-īs, inter-it, etc. As for why eō acts like that—the stem was originally something like *ei- (*eiō *eire etc). But Latin generally didn't like sequences of three vowels in a row, so the first singular *eiō ...


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