We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
11

I'd guess it's the symbol for 6, originally digamma, but later taking on an S-like shape. (It's a bit hard to make out, but I think the last two cells contain ΙΑ and ΙΒ, indicating a series of 1 to 12.)


9

This inscription does not use spacing to separate words. (Word division was often not marked consistently, or not marked at all in Roman inscriptions.) The second and third lines actually say "IN DEO VIVAS". "IN" is a preposition (meaning "in"), "DEO" is a noun ("god/God") in the ablative case, and "VIVAS" is a verb ("live") in the second-person singular ...


8

I haven't completely figured out the book's layout, but it appears that it contains both volumes IX and X. In any case, the numbering starts over at index #160 (pg. 4), and the entry you're looking for is at index #230 (pg. 74): Portavi lacrimis madidus te nostra catella, quod feci lustris laetior ante tribus. Ergo mihi, Patrice, iam non dabis oscula ...


8

The source of the image states that the person died the 17th of September. The inscription says instead that he died the 15th of October. What is KAL. to do with it? Is some sort of calendar correction? This is how the Roman calendar works. The day is ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Octobres, "on the fifteenth day before the first of October". With the ...


7

This headstone is in Latin. Your transcription is quite good, but the text includes several abbreviations, which I've filled in below with brackets: D[EO] O[PTIMO] M[AXIMO] MORTALIT[ATIS] SUAE MEMOR ANDREAS SEYLER REIP[UBLICAE] MEMMING[EN] SENAT[OR] ET PHARMACOP[OLA] BIPONT[I] NAT[US] MDCCVI DIE XXIV APR[ILIS] MONUMENT[UM] HOC ...


7

With some help from this description, which contains a few errors, here's what I think it says: Templum hoc r[e]novatum est [l]ateribus denuo et integre regnante serenissimo do[mi]no do[mi]no principe Georgio Rakoci Anno do[mini] 1640 My translation: This temple [i.e. church] was completely and newly renovated with bricks during the reign of ...


6

As L&S put it, in their classic textwall style (entry for in, II.C.2): Of the object or end in view, regarded also as the motive of action or effect: “non te in me illiberalem, sed me in se neglegentem putabit,” Cic. Fam. 13, 1, 16: “neglegentior in patrem,” Just. 32, 3, 1: “in quem omnes intenderat curas,” Curt. 3, 1, 21: “quos ardere in proelia vidi,...


6

I don’t think there is any attestation of a direct prohibition of the no smoking type for the classical period. The closest I could find is CIL VI, 2357, from Rome, but it is not a prohibition, it is a kind request: HOSPES AD HUNC TUMULUM NI MEIAS OSSA PRECANTUR TECTA HOMINIS SET SI GRATUS HOMO ES MISCE BIBE DA MI NI=ne, SET=sed, MI=mihi Passerby, the ...


6

Sumelic is right. I just want to add a few things. First, the expression in Deo vivas and related (e.g. vivatis in Christo, "may you live in Christ") seem to be of common use among Christians of the period. For instance, it's also found in a ring saying "Antoni vivas in Deo" (it appears reversed): Other examples are cited here and here. Interestingly ...


5

While Freeth's 2006 paper (with the good transcriptions) isn't freely available, his 2012 paper (analyzing the text in more detail) is! From here: The inscriptions are engraved in skilfully executed serifed capital letters very similar to the lettering of inscriptions on stone from the last three centuries BC. The letter forms are most characteristic of ...


5

It is indeed one of the forms of Digamma, the form particularly used as a numeral. See Here


4

The digraph FH was used in early Etruscan inscriptions to represent [f], though it was later replaced by a new sign, looking like the number 𐌚. (Wiki has some more information on this.) As far as I know, FH is not known to have been used in Latin anywhere other than in the Praeneste fibula. Its use for [f] on the fibula (which has sometimes been thought to ...


4

Usually an adjective (and here meus works like an adjective) takes the form of the closest referent when used attributively. The masculine plural would be used in a sentence like "the wife and soul are mine". I find it better to put the adjective at the end, which would give you uxor animusque meus. If you don't want to use anima instead of animus (they ...


4

The Romans counted backwards from one of three datum days,and included both the datum and the day itself. KAL is short for Kalendis, the first day of the month, so 15 KAL indicates 13 days between the 1st October,and the day itself, giving us the 17th September. This inscription appears to be unusual in two ways. First, it's usual to find A.D. before the ...


3

Literally, "force wins". (Force/violence/strength/power, overcomes/overpowers/overtakes.)


3

A famous Greek example: Plato supposedly put a sign over the door to his school reading ἀγεωμέτρητος μηδεὶς εἰσίτω, “May no one ignorant of geometry enter here” “Geometriae ignarus nullus ingrediatur”. The story is apparently apocryphal (see: https://www.persee.fr/doc/reg_0035-2039_1968_num_81_384_1013).


2

The grammar is not correct, but I believe the intended meaning is, "We desire an opportunity to travel around." I.e., we don't want to be locked up any more. This makes perfect sense in the context of a prison. Occasio + genitive = "an opportunity/chance of doing X" It seems like the writer tried to use desiderium + a nobis to mean "is desired by us." ...


2

The other answers have correctly explained "Kal". AS stands for anno salutis. The English equivalent is "in the year of grace". https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anno_Salutis


2

(This is only a partial answer; I need to look at some more sources to check what I say here. Also, I'm not a professional or expert, so don't get your inscription made right after reading this post!) Brianpck says in his answer here that in Latin, attributive adjectives that semantically refer to multiple coordinated nouns tend to agree in gender and ...


1

It could be "dono" which would mean "by gift" Donum fed into most Romance languages, and would make sense to be placed here to show the king helped out of generosity Templum hoc r[e]novatum est [l]ateribus denuo et integre regnante serenissimo dono do[mi]no principe Georgio Rakoci Anno do[mini] 1640 This temple was fully rebuilt with bricks By gift of the ...


1

I believe it's something along the lines of "Strength Overcomes", or "Strength Conquers".


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible