14

The word is reservaculum, "something used to keep things in", from reservo "keep (back)". I believe this word is used to describe the pouch of marsupials in similar texts from that period. Praesumably, this was before the word marsupial was invented, which is derived from Latin marsupium, "pouch". Incidentally, you have uon where it should be non. A plain ...


8

I can answer the second part, at least. That's a tilde ĩ, not a macron ī, and it's one of the most common scribal abbreviations, representing a following N or M. So anĩal, tẽpore, oblatũ = animal, tempore, oblatum. This is where the modern tilde used in Spanish and Portuguese comes from: Latin annum > anno > Spanish año "year". It originated as a small "N" ...


7

With some help from this description, which contains a few errors, here's what I think it says: Templum hoc r[e]novatum est [l]ateribus denuo et integre regnante serenissimo do[mi]no do[mi]no principe Georgio Rakoci Anno do[mini] 1640 My translation: This temple [i.e. church] was completely and newly renovated with bricks during the reign of ...


6

I don’t think there is any attestation of a direct prohibition of the no smoking type for the classical period. The closest I could find is CIL VI, 2357, from Rome, but it is not a prohibition, it is a kind request: HOSPES AD HUNC TUMULUM NI MEIAS OSSA PRECANTUR TECTA HOMINIS SET SI GRATUS HOMO ES MISCE BIBE DA MI NI=ne, SET=sed, MI=mihi Passerby, the ...


6

As L&S put it, in their classic textwall style (entry for in, II.C.2): Of the object or end in view, regarded also as the motive of action or effect: “non te in me illiberalem, sed me in se neglegentem putabit,” Cic. Fam. 13, 1, 16: “neglegentior in patrem,” Just. 32, 3, 1: “in quem omnes intenderat curas,” Curt. 3, 1, 21: “quos ardere in proelia vidi,...


4

The digraph FH was used in early Etruscan inscriptions to represent [f], though it was later replaced by a new sign, looking like the number 𐌚. (Wiki has some more information on this.) As far as I know, FH is not known to have been used in Latin anywhere other than in the Praeneste fibula. Its use for [f] on the fibula (which has sometimes been thought to ...


3

A famous Greek example: Plato supposedly put a sign over the door to his school reading ἀγεωμέτρητος μηδεὶς εἰσίτω, “May no one ignorant of geometry enter here” “Geometriae ignarus nullus ingrediatur”. The story is apparently apocryphal (see: https://www.persee.fr/doc/reg_0035-2039_1968_num_81_384_1013).


3

Literally, "force wins". (Force/violence/strength/power, overcomes/overpowers/overtakes.)


3

One of your conclusions is, I feel, justified: that the j in hujus is due to it being pronounced as a consonant/semivowel, since that was always the case. More than that: from Classical times (and actually earlier than that) almost all instances of consonantal i between vowels were geminated, since intervocalic short /j/ was lost at an earlier stage (e.g. ...


1

It could be "dono" which would mean "by gift" Donum fed into most Romance languages, and would make sense to be placed here to show the king helped out of generosity Templum hoc r[e]novatum est [l]ateribus denuo et integre regnante serenissimo dono do[mi]no principe Georgio Rakoci Anno do[mini] 1640 This temple was fully rebuilt with bricks By gift of the ...


1

I believe it's something along the lines of "Strength Overcomes", or "Strength Conquers".


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible