10

You are correct, this is a passive infinitive: "to be counted". The passive versions of amāre, habēre, currere, and audīre are amārī, habērī, currī, and audīrī.


9

You're correct that this is an infinitive! It's just the passive infinitive, rather than the active, so I would read scelus as the subject rather than the person atoning. Rearranging the words into an English order rather than a Latin one, we get: …enim hōc scelus potuit expiārī ūnō modō …for this crime was able to be atoned for in only one way The passive ...


8

Salve!, and welcome to the site! The translation you point is missing a word or two, but it's not too far from correct. A fairly literal translation is: To see but not [to] be seen Videre and videri are, respectively, the active and passive infinitives of the verb for seein, hence: to see and to be seen. Sed is an adversative conjunction, but. Non is an ...


6

In the preceding paragraph Kepler has just described the fourth reason, so this seems to be simply a normal perfect infinitive with anterior meaning: "let it suffice to have suggested it", i.e. "let the fact that I have just suggested it be sufficient".


5

Fugio, -ere always means "fleeing/avoiding/escaping." There is another, rarer 1st conjugation verb fugo which means "put to flight," but this isn't used in your example sentence. As Sebastian notes, I think your confusion comes from a misunderstanding of an earlier part of the sentence. Though I like some of your translation choices (e.g. ...


5

The main verb of the clause, datur is impersonal. In English the subject 'it' would be used (though, grammatically speaking, the real subject is the infinitive cognoscere). → '...it isn't given/granted/permitted...' or even '...it isn't possible....' Remember that cognoscere really means 'know' or to 'be familiar with' only in the perfective tenses (perfect, ...


3

I'd put it this way: "[...] which value however cannot be known other than by approximation [I think this is the mathematical term]." 'Literally' (I don't like that term and don't really think it makes sense, but anyhow): "[...] which value however other than by approximation ('by approaching', a gerund in the ablative) to know (it) is not ...


3

Yes, and in this case "future" means in the future with respect to the main verb. So if you translate sentences like "I said that you would like that steak" or "I am saying that you will like that steak" into Latin, you need the future active infinitive where English has "would like" in one sentence and "will ...


2

As others have said, the infinitive wasn't generally used to indicate purpose in Classical Latin. But this does happen fairly regularly in later times. For a famous example, in the apocryphal Acts of Peter, Peter is fleeing persecution in the city when he runs into Jesus. He asks, Domine, quo vadis? ("Lord, where are you going?") and Jesus responds ...


2

Est visum is perfect passive but impersonal (the actual subject being the infinitive exhibere). It means something like 'it has seemed best' or 'it has seemed proper.' Hanc seriem is the direct object of exhibere. When the verb evadere has a predicate noun or adjective, as here (permutabiles), it means 'To end up, emerge, turn out (as)' (definition 8a in ...


2

Your question gives me the impression that you might be confused about the following points: The perfect passive infinitive of "amo" is formed with the infinitive esse and a form of the perfect passive particicle amatus/amata/amatum. Any perfect passive participle inflects like an adjective of the first and second declension, with a masculine ...


2

I don't think it's 100% right to translate infinitives as participles, as you're doing. Esse is less "being" and more "to be," and the difference isn't trivial. Esse, for example, cannot be used attributively, whereas participles can. It's the difference between étant and être. For your specific questions, yes, in English the perfect ...


1

It’s a military saying ( videre sed non videri ) see but not be seen it used but Recce and sniper teams and any other covert observation platoons


1

To add to the other answers. Quo can replace ut to introduce a relative clause of purpose. Compared to the other alternatives, this option seems to be scarcer; it is used primarily (but not exclusively) when the clause contains a comparative: legem brevem esse oportet quo facilius ab imperitis teneatur. (The law should be short to be more comprehensible to ...


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