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1

Both are fine. I think this is analogous to the question whether a verb should be listed as trahere or traho. Both conventions are in use and both make sense; see e.g. this question for a further discussion. The choice of the basic form of something for listing purposes is arbitrary, as it is a description in isolation of something that can only really be ...


12

From medieval scholasticism onward, the titles or summations of enumerated items in disputations are commonly phrased as subordinate clauses, either indirect statements (either accusative with infinitive or the Late Latin variant, quod + subjunctive) or indirect questions. For instance, in Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologiae, we find "Quaestio Prima" ...


3

My Latin is nonexistent, so the following may be totally wrong, but it's too long for a comment and hopefully fills in the background correctly. Mathematical instruction in Newton's era consisted of reading the Elements, and I think Newton would have read them in Latin. The Principia are written in a lordly, impersonal style, with Newton having erased all ...


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