14

The direct question 'What is love?' has been embedded into another sentence, forming an indirect question. An indirect question 'gives the substance of the question, adapted to the form of the sentence in which it is quoted' (Allen & Greenough, New Latin grammar, §330.2). In Latin, the verb in indirect questions is usually subjunctive, not indicative. ...


7

The verb in question (minor, -ari, -atus) is a deponent verb, which means that it has a passive form but an active meaning. There are many such verbs in Latin. Consider the following cases: Multa passus est. He suffered many things. or: Te hortamur... We urge you...


7

An indirect question is a noun clause and can indeed be used as the subject of the main clause, as required, wherever it makes sense to do so. Here are some examples to supplement the passage from De bello gallico 3.14. (The translations aren't mine.) Indirect question as subject of a form of esse, with a neuter adjective as complement: primo nobis fuit ...


6

Are you familiar with accusativus cum infinitivo (ACI)? All of the bolded infinitives in your quote belong to an ACI structure, and should not be treated in isolation from other parts of the structure. As the name suggests, ACI comes with an accusative and an infinitive. In English it is often best translated as a subordinate clause starting with "that", ...


3

I have always been taught that indirect questions are written as such: Rettulit mihi quid accidisset. Indirect questions are formed where the main part of the sentence, in this case to relate, is in the indicative, followed by the question word (what), and ending with the verb making up the question in the subjunctive. Let me make this more clear with ...


2

Moments after asking the question I stumbled upon this in Caesar's De bello Gallico: Quae ubi convenit ac primum ab hostibus visa est, circiter CCXX naves eorum paratissimae atque omni genere armorum ornatissimae profectae ex portu nostris adversae constiterunt; neque satis Bruto, qui classi praeerat, vel tribunis militum centurionibusque, quibus singulae ...


2

As an indirect question in subjunctive: "Quaerit an/utrum civitas capta sit."


1

An indirect question always uses subjunctive (also called conjunctive) in Latin. You just write the question as if it were a normal question, and then change indicative to subjunctive. An accusative with infinitive cannot be used for indirect questions. Unless the question contains a question word (quis, quando, or similar), an indirect question is often ...


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