12 votes
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Quidquid veto non licet, certe non oportet

It seems to be a typo, the original sentence being Quidquid vero non licet, certe non oportet. Google search. The quote comes from Cic. Balb. 8 Vero means in truth, in fact, certainly, truly, to be ...
Rafael's user avatar
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8 votes
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Usage of passive in Summa Theologiae

The impersonal passive can be used when you want to describe an action, but you don't want to specify who did it, and there was no logical object to turn into a subject for the passive. Amongst the ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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7 votes
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Syntax of sentences with the verb "pudet"

As you have seen, the syntax of pudet-type verbs is not an easy topic. Here I will limit myself to answering the questions you have included in your post: (In the example) "Nōnne tē pudet hoc ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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7 votes
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What is the subject of "venit" in this sentence from Naufragium?

Indeed, Cicero himself uses in mentem venire impersonally, though with the genitive rather than de: cum hoc vereor et cupio tibi aliqua ex parte quod salva fide possim parcere, rursus immuto ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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6 votes
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Null expletive objects in Latin? "Cariotae cum ficis certandum habent" (Plin. Ep. 1,8)

Here is one possible way to parse this kind of constructions. (The instance you quote is not unique as the examples below indicate.) Recall that there are two ways to indicate possession: domum habeo ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

Quidquid veto non licet, certe non oportet

yeah, it's supposed to be vero, which serves as an adverb All that which, truthfully, is not lawful, assuredly is unbecoming / unnecessary.
FluffyFlareon's user avatar
4 votes

What is the subject of "venit" in this sentence from Naufragium?

According to Pinkster (2015: 117): "The expression mihi venit in mentem is used either as an impersonal expression, with the entity remembered or forgotten expressed in the genitive, or as a ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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4 votes
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How to translate "The chapters must be studied well to pass the test."?

One way to speak generally, without naming a specific subject, is to use an impersonal verb like oportet: Oportet capitula perlegere si examen transibis. (Literally: It is proper/necessary to read ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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3 votes

On the absence of impersonal passives of deponent verbs

I have a thought: the gerundive (along with gerund and present participle) is exceptional in deponent verbs. Whereas all other passive forms of deponents (both past passive participles and passive ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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3 votes
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Impersonal Verbs: Are Active Transitives Possible?

Here is a couple of examples from Plautus that could be relevant for your question: a. Personal use of a transitive verb like decet: contempla ut haec (vestis) me deceat (Pl. Most. 172). 'See how ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the grammatical "logic" of impersonal constructions like "Me non solum piget stultitiae meae sed etiam pudet" (Cic. De Dom. 29)?

Let us look at the verbs behaving like this and some corresponding nouns: pudere; pudor paenitere; paenitia, paenitudo taedere; taedium pigere; ? miserere; miseria The list of related nouns is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

How to translate "The chapters must be studied well to pass the test."?

I would say: "Bene capita inspectanda (sunt) ut succedere possit." Word-by-word this is: "[Well] [the chapters] [must be studied + (be.PRESENT)] [so that] [to succeed] [one is able].&...
Nickimite's user avatar
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2 votes

Null expletive objects in Latin? "Cariotae cum ficis certandum habent" (Plin. Ep. 1,8)

A summary, before the comments are deleted: the gerundive plus habere (referred to, here, as "habere plus accusative" was a little-used, colloquial equivalent of the better-known, more widely used "...
tony's user avatar
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1 vote
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On the absence of impersonal passives of deponent verbs

Impersonal passive deponents are rare, but not unknown. See Pinkster, Oxford Latin Syntax, 1.5.34. As forms that occur more than once, he lists morabitur, sortiri, and medeatur. He refers to a ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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