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6 votes
Accepted

Infinitive as an instruction

You're missing the main verb, which occurs just before the quoted section: harum ergo alterutram curabis quam plurimam et quam optimis uasis conditam ante quinquennium in sole ponere, deinde, cum ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.8k
4 votes

Can we use "numquam" with a imperative?

(*) As suggested in the comments we can have negative command with numquam + perfect subjective. quod [vulnus] is [Pomponio] se passum pro Caesare pugnantem gloriabatur, ‘numquam fugiens respexeris’ ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

How would I say the imperative command "Heal!"?

Fī sānus! Literally, "Become well!" Addressed to a woman, it would need to be Fī sāna! This avoids a problem with verbs like sānā and cūrā, which suggest taking some sort of action, like ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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4 votes

How would I say the imperative command "Heal!"?

Medice, cūrā tē ipsum! is the famous proverb, quoted by Jesus in Luke 4:23, meaning "Physician, heal thyself!" The primary meaning of cūrāre is "to take care of", "to take ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Is the inscription "avoca te" really a novel phrase?

A search through the PHI corpus reveals that the exact phrase avoca te was never used in any surviving work of classical literature. I don't know of an easy way to search through the corpus of ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.2k
3 votes

Libera te tutemet ex inferis vs. Libera temet [ipsum] ab inferis?

Yes, the most grammatically correct version of the phrase would probably be "Libera temet ab inferis." There are two reasons I suggest this: As already explained, the preposition ab makes ...
Anonymous's user avatar
  • 233
2 votes

How would I say the imperative command "Heal!"?

"Heal (somebody)" is "sana (aliquem)". "Heal" as in "to become healthy" is "corrige", albeit "corrige" can mean very different things.
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Translating Gollum's "Go away and never come back!"

"et numquam" should be avoided (North and Hillard, Latin Prose Composition p. 11, note; Rubenbauer-Hoffmann, Lateinische Grammatik §224a) Abi neque umquam redi
Allan Rosengren's user avatar
1 vote

Is the inscription "avoca te" really a novel phrase?

Broadening the search a little bit, I found an almost identical phrase in Sermon 261 of St. Augustine (AD 354-430): Prius ergo cogita de corde mundando: hoc habeto negotium, ad hoc te avoca, insta ...
brianpck's user avatar
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