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54

"Veni vidi vici" means "I came, I saw, I conquered." "Venit vidit vicit" means "He/she/it came, he/she/it saw, he/she/it conquered." It doesn't make any judgement about gender. If you think that the gender is important, Latin uses a demonstrative-y/pronoun-like particle: "is/ea/id" which correspond to "...


26

Google Translate is unreliable with Latin and you should not take anything it gives seriously. The suggestion non insectum opus est sounds like "an insect is not work". I am not aware of good Latin words for "bug" or "feature". Therefore I would take a different approach and suggest: Non forte sed ratione. Not by chance but by ...


21

It's: Vēnit, vīdit, vīcit. whether the subject is masculine, feminine, or neuter. Latin only has grammatical gender agreement between nouns and the adjectives that modify them. Subject-verb agreement in Latin only involves grammatical person (I, you, he/she/it) and number (singular and plural).


16

You seem to be addressing several issues in this question. To start from the bottom line: Latin is already being used right now as a daily casual language. Not even a small reserve about this statement. The external world changes, and new words are born. It happens in every language and Latin is no exception to that. New words are finally integrated into the ...


15

Welcome to the site! Non ministrari, sed ministrare (VG Mt 20,28) Is a well-attested phrase with that exact meaning. It literally means not to be served but to serve. The context is Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew saying that He (the Son of man) came not to be served but to serve. Update: it is (arguably) a common choice for mottos. Besides the American ...


13

Latin is used regularly within the Vatican and Catholic Church, so depending on what you mean by daily usage I think that fulfills that requirement. There are also a lot of loan words that make their way into modern Latin, both historically and currently. For example, Vicipaedia, the Latin version of Wikipedia. Latin is also used regularly on this site for ...


13

Here's Cicero, congratulating his friend Atticus on the birth of the latter's daughter (Ad Atticum 5.19): Filiolam tuam tibi iam Romae iucundam esse gaudeo, eamque quam numquam vidi tamen et amo et amabilem esse certo scio. Etiam atque etiam vale. I am glad that you now delight in your little daughter in Rome, and though I have never seen her, I still love ...


12

An excellent medieval Latin word, which captures the sense of "wishful thinking" almost exactly, is velleitas, from which we get the (somewhat uncommon) English word "velleity." Thomas Aquinas uses the word 12 times in his corpus, but his best explanation is in the Summa Theologiae, I-II, q. 13, a. 5, ad 1: Ad primum ergo dicendum quod ...


10

If you want to indicate that a differing opinion or a criticism is not intended as a personal attack (which is what I interpret the phrase “with all due respect” to mean), a common phrase is: bona venia tua dixerim I'd like to say with your gracious permission Likewise you can also say: pace tua dixerim I'd like to say without disturbing your peace i.e.: ...


10

I myself have wondered about this on numerous occasions, and here's what I've learned: There were no separate greetings for different times of day in ancient Rome, unlike in modern European languages. The universal greeting salvē "be well!", or the more bombastic havĕ (from Punic ḥave "live!" - don't get fooled by the common spelling avē)...


9

Publius Syrus expressed that very thing in Sententiae: Lepores duo qui insequitur, is neutrum capit.


9

I'm not aware of an existing Latin idiom with the same meaning, so I'll translate instead. The offered translation is nonsense; it has a cow, a shop, and China (the country!) but the syntax makes no sense. Let me start with vocabulary: The typical word for a bull is bos. Figlina means a potter's workshop or a pottery. See L&S for more meanings; this is ...


9

Early attestations In Plautus (num)quid causae is found three times (Pseudolus 533, Rudens 758, Trinummus 1188), every time with est. There may be earlier attestations, but Plautus is pretty old and thus the construction is not a late invention. I would rather analyze the idiom as quid causae est, including the verb. Leaving est out is a common feature and ...


8

It's somewhat more general than the question, but there's a famous Latin saying: Quidquid agis, prudenter agas et respice finem. In everything you do, act wisely and consider the end. It is from the Gesta Romanorum, a late medieval collection of fables, chapter 103. It's actually one of three “wisdoms” sold by a merchant to a just ruler for mille florenis, ...


8

I'll offer something with a slightly different approach in an attempt to be more idiomatic in structure: Si quis tibi occurrit, sua habet certamina abscondita. If anyone meets you, they have their own hidden struggles. Opening a sentence with a condition with si quis appears to be very common and feels like an idiomatic way to say essentially "...


8

Surely you can go no further back than the New Testament. After learning the news that she is to be the mother of Jesus, Mary goes to minister to her cousin Elizabeth, who is expecting John the Baptist. Here are the words of Elizabeth's greeting to Mary from Luke 1:42-43: Εὐλογημένη σὺ ἐν γυναιξίν, καὶ εὐλογημένος ὁ καρπὸς τῆς κοιλίας σου. καὶ πόθεν μοι ...


7

To express the idea of one/two/three/etc. more (of something), you use an ablative to indicate the degree of difference. Therefore, to render 'one more apple' or 'one more battle,' you literally say, 'more apples by one (apple)' or 'more battles by one (battle).' Or, to use the example that tony gives in a comment, you say 'more loaves than yesterday by ...


7

Happy Sabbath. Using your words I'd say "Sit sabbatum beatum" which would mean "May (your) Sabbath be happy." I like your use of beatus-- it is used in a divine context fairly often, and it contains the positive sentiment that this phase intends. These two are off-the-cuff guesses at potential ways to achieve your meaning. You could say (...


7

The commentary that I have for the Menaechmi, by P. Thoresby Jones (Oxford U. Press), has this note for the line: Samiae: i.e. fragile like earthenware. Samian ware was the commonest crockery used at Rome; cf. Stich. 694; Cic. pro Mur. 36,75. Definition 3 for Samius in Oxford Latin dictionary states this: 3 (applied to a cheap, brittle type of pottery ...


7

Any sort of word with the idea of hope/expectation/desire would really do, depending on the context. So, for example, Rackham translates the following of Cicero: Optare hoc quidem est, non disputare. This is wishful thinking (lit. to desire, to wish for), not investigation. Wishful thinking, after all, is just "wishfulness" without logically ...


6

The case here is ablative. The preposition “ex” preceding the word “machina” is one of the many common usages of the ablative case. This could be the ablative of place (from), or as you can in your English translation, ablative of means.


6

There was a reference to Rotary in one of the early episodes. Rotary International’s motto is “Service Above Self.” Possible connection?


6

The last word is wrong, it should be movebo. Then it is an exact quote from Vergil's epic Aeneid (liber VII, 312), one of the most famous works in the Latin language, and in world literature. It does indeed roughly mean “If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell.” More literally: If I cannot bend heaven to my will, make heaven do my bidding, etc., I will ...


6

So, I'd recommend something like this: Cursores, parate vos, ite/decurrite! Literally: Runners, prepare yourselves... Go/Run! With paro you would want to use a pronoun reflexively, as the verb is transitive (takes a direct object). An important thing to remember when translating is that a literal translation is often not the best one. You have to bear in ...


6

The phrase everyone you meet seems like a idiomatic way to say everybody, so I would translate it as: Omnis certamen certat quod nequaquam scis. A simpler way to say it, although with less emphasis, would be: Omnis certamen certat quod nescis.


6

The most common choice is the pair tam…quam. For example: Es tam altus quam Marcus. You are as tall as Marcus.


6

Both are correct Latin, with slightly different meanings. Status quō literally means "the state in which [things currently are]". It's normally used as a noun, as in "maintaining the status quo". Statū quō literally means "[in] the state in which [things currently are]". I've only seen this form used as an adverb or adjective, ...


5

From the Temple of Apollo, at Delphi, the pithy aphorism: "nosce te ipsum" = "learn to know yourself". (The simplistic use of imperative, "nosce" (from "nosco" = "learn to know"), with accusative direct object, "te", intensified with a part of "ipse" = "self", the accusative &...


5

The verb sanescere sounds good, although it seems to be quite rare. (What do I have to read in Lewis & Short? Post-Augustan? Fie!) The usual term is convalescere. You can say mox sanesce for sure, but it sounds a bit like an overly literal translation, does it not? I would prefer something like: Fac quam primum convalescas. Please recover as soon as ...


5

I am not aware of a comparable expression in Latin. The most idiomatic option seems to be using pronouns. For "the car in question" I would suggest: raeda ea raeda eadem raeda ipsa raeda illa raeda raeda cita/citata raeda praedicta The best choice depends on what kind of emphasis you need. If you want to underline that it is the very same car and ...


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