Skip to main content
17 votes
Accepted

What does „fecerunt pedes“ mean in Latin inscriptions?

In afraid you shouldn't have glossed over the numerals so easily. The first inscription does not, in fact, say M. and S. made the/these feet but in fact: M. and S. made 100 feet The foot was used ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
11 votes

Moonfleet latin idiom

The version in lusu alae is quite widespread on the Internet, but it is obviously incorrect (as cnread writes in a comment, that would be a form of ala, “wing”) and not authentic. In Meade Falkner's ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

How would you translate "Nothing but the rain"?

For the first, your expression is correct. For example: quid uides? Plautus, Menaechmi 1062 In the second, probably nihil would be more common: est sed nulla iam ultra gens, nihil nisi fluctus ac saxa ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,001
8 votes
Accepted

What conjunctive function does "ruat caelum" have in "Fiat justitia, ruat caelum"?

No ellipsis of cum needs to be assumed. A bare subjunctive can also be used with concessive force. One example is Cicero, In Verrinem 2.5.4: sit fur, sit sacrilegus, sit flagitiorum omnium ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 20.1k
7 votes
Accepted

Versions of natura non saltum facit

The difference here isn't actually one of case, but one of number. Saltum is accusative singular, a single leap, while saltūs is accusative plural, an arbitrary number of leaps. In other words, natura ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
6 votes
Accepted

How do you say "What about us?" in Latin?

"What will happen to us" can indeed be translated as Quid de nobis futurum est? See for example Cicero, Ad fam. 9, 17: Immo vero, si me amas, tu fac, ut sciam, quid de nobis futurum sit... ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes

Roman wedding congratulations

Roman weddings, although merry, were somewhat more solemn than modern ones and the central aspect were serious hymns. There is a work by Ausonius called Cento Nuptualis in which a wedding is described....
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,001
4 votes
Accepted

Is the expression "ut poësis pictura" formally correct?

Ut poesis pictura literally means 'as poetry, [so] painting'. Since both nouns occupy the same syntactic spot, it is semantically and grammatically sound to reverse the phrase to ut pictura poesis 'as ...
gaufridus's user avatar
  • 156
4 votes
Accepted

Is there a phrase meaning specifically "as far as I know", as opposed to "as far as I see" ("quantum ab hoc")?

As far as he can tell, he is a fine young boy with a big shining smile. This is the same idiom as what you mentioned in the title, and so I would still recommend using quantum videtur (without the ab ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 55.5k
4 votes

How would you translate the phrase “for myself”?

The simple solution is to say mihi ipsi, which works independent of your gender. (Many expressions in Latin look a bit different for men and women.) In specific contexts there may be better choices of ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

A correct title for the book from the Evil Dead movies?

If you come to think about it, the title "Naturan Demanto" could be a mispronunciation of another title: A real book by Italian geographer and theologian Giovannia D’Anania, "De Natura ...
Fernan Nebiros's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

"I close, therefore I am"

You have a few different options, as Smith's shows, including claudo (the origin of the English "close"), praecludo (not mentioned in Smith's here) and operio, which is often used of gates ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 55.5k
4 votes

Is there a way to say the English phrase "Get it over with" in Latin?

This is not a perfect fit, but I suggest the imperative age. It can come in combinations like age dic, "go ahead and say", so if there is a specific verb that goes with the action in ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Use of subjunctive in translation of movie quote

No, you cannot use ad in this way, because ad is a preposition with the accusative. Even if you could, it would still not help you, because ad simply doesn't mean “until.” For “until,” the usual Latin ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Was there an idiom meaning the same as English idiom "Must be a day ending in 'y'!" or Croatian "Ista priča svakog dana!"?

The obvious quotable that comes to mind in this spirit is: Nihil sub sole novum Though this isn't a Classical idiom, of course, but a quote from the Vulgate (Ecclesiastes 1:10 there, 1:9 everywhere ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
  • 10.2k
3 votes

How would you translate "blood for blood" into Latin?

"An eye for an eye" is, conveniently, a Biblical phrase, so we can look at how Jerome translated it. In this case, the relevant chapter is Exodus 21. Sin autem mors ejus fuerit subsecuta, ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
3 votes

«Dream and believe» in Latin

"Somnium et Crede" means "A dream and believe!", the only context I can think of where it would make sense is as an answer to a question like "Name a noun and a word beginning ...
Anserin's user avatar
  • 422
3 votes
Accepted

Latin phrase meaning "this is the end of the road, and of the map"

Brundisium longae finis chartaeque viaeque est. is the last line (104) of Horatius' Satyrarum Libri 1.5, also known as Iter quoddam suum Roma Brundusium usque singulari cum festivitate describit. ...
JobRozemond's user avatar
  • 1,368
3 votes

Is there a phrase meaning specifically "as far as I know", as opposed to "as far as I see" ("quantum ab hoc")?

Another way to go is Equidem: L&S (II.B) gives several examples among which this from Pliny: Aristoteles tradit et simul plures [cometae] cerni, nemini conpertum alteri, quod equidem sciam. [...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
3 votes

How should a question be formulated to call for an ablative of respect as the answer?

A plain ablative quo is way too ambiguous without context. It could be asking for reason, tool, method, route or other things in addition to the thing you are after. If you supply a general noun, both ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

Latin for 'at arm's length'

[I now see that OP already suggested extra ictu in a comment, but classified this as "uncertain" - However I think this example from Seneca makes a good case for it - in particular the usage ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
3 votes

How would you translate the phrase “for myself”?

Another possibly is to use Meā causā which means "for my own sake". To say “everything I do is for myself” we can have: Quidquid facio, mea causa facio
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
3 votes
Accepted

Is the inscription "avoca te" really a novel phrase?

A search through the PHI corpus reveals that the exact phrase avoca te was never used in any surviving work of classical literature. I don't know of an easy way to search through the corpus of ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.6k
2 votes

How would you translate the phrase “for myself”?

Joonas' suggestion, mihi ipsi, is good but is somewhat emphatic: 'for me myself'. I am partial to d_e's suggestion, mea causa; it is idiomatic without emphasis. You might also consider simply pro me, ...
gaufridus's user avatar
  • 156
2 votes

Idiomatic translation of "By the book"

Another similar suggestion to @ktm5124 is: ad/per praescriptum. While seems to mean the very much the same it feels like it can be also used more casually. Lets take a look of this examples from ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
2 votes
Accepted

Dissecting Quod erat demonstrandum

Yes. In Quod erat demonstrandum the sense of necessity can be attributed completely to the gerundive. As in our case, often the gerundive is coupled with the verb esse (to be) - most famously in ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
2 votes

Does a quote like this exist: "Now that the gods are involved, [fate is sealed]."

Not pessimistic, but: haec Iovem sentire deosque cunctos spem bonam certamque domum reporto ("We take to heart the good and certain hope that this is the will of Jove and all the gods." ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,001
2 votes

Prequel, or the story before?

Not sure if these are it, but what about prologus or prooemium? A prologus in ancient drama is that section at the beginning of a play that sets out the background, characters, and context for the ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 55.5k
2 votes

Prequel, or the story before?

How about antecedens "preceding" as the opposite of sequela "that which follows".
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible