Hot answers tagged

6

Both are correct Latin, with slightly different meanings. Status quō literally means "the state in which [things currently are]". It's normally used as a noun, as in "maintaining the status quo". Statū quō literally means "[in] the state in which [things currently are]". I've only seen this form used as an adverb or adjective, ...


4

In my opinion “I wonder” is such a versatile expression in English that it is futile to wish for a direct Latin equivalent that would cover all uses. For example, with sentence questions, “I wonder” often means little more than “maybe.” I haven't seen the cat in a while. I wonder if he is sleeping. Felem aliquamdiu non vidi. Nescio an dormiat. On the other ...


3

The adjective prodigiosus means "unnatural, strange, wonderful, marvellous, prodigious". Not a perfect fit, but certainly an option if you like the tone. If you want to use that, it should be in the plural form prodigiosi instead. Google Translate is horrible with Latin and is not to be trusted. A nice simple option would be to say: Valent viri, &...


3

It has already been pointed out that Suetonius reported the words "καὶ σύ, τέκνον" as Caesar's last, and that these are the ultimate origin of Shakespeare's "Et tu, Brute?" (though it seems to be Richard Edes who first coined the Latin phrase, in his 1582 Latin-language play Caesar Interfectes, seventeen years before Shakespeare's Julius ...


2

Based on German "Ich frage mich", I started out with inquiro, but that does not cover it. Then I wondered: would miror do?


1

It seems arcessitus (L&S II) might be a good candidate. Naturally, a 'wishfully-thought' scenario is indeed usually sought, forced and far-fetched. L&S brings this: cavendum est, ne arcessitum dictum putetur (that an expression may not appear forced, far-fetched). For the time being, I could not find examples of arcessitus (or accersitus) being ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible