15 votes
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What era of Latin did Horace write in?

Horace, or Quintus Horatius Flaccus as he is known in Latin, wrote in Classical Latin. He lived 65–8 BCE, whereas the era of Classical Latin is considered to be roughly 75 BCE–300 CE. As his entire ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
15 votes
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Why would avoiding olive oil be a negative thing?

In the classical period, olive oil was considered a must-have piece of equipment for an athlete. The exact details of its use aren't known perfectly, but it appears that it was coated on an athlete's ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
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11 votes
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What does "quibus intemptata nites" (Odes 1.5.10–11) mean?

Horace's poem here is about a pretty young girl, Pyrrha, and I understand the phrase to describe how unfortunate (miseri) the men are who have not been able to touch (tempto/tento) her. I might ...
cjmcnamara's user avatar
10 votes
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Horace quotes a Greek proverb in Ars Poetica, what does it mean?

The Greek proverb is very straightforward: ὤδινεν ὄρος, εἶτα μυν­ ἀπέτεκεν A mountain is in labor, then gives birth to a mouse. As your commentary notes, Horace transposed it into the future. The ...
cnread's user avatar
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8 votes
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Origin of "seize the day" as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

I have looked into this some more and think I can now give a precise answer to the question. The earliest published translation of Horace 1,11 to render “carpe diem” as “seize the day” is in THE WORKS ...
fdb's user avatar
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8 votes
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"Desinat in piscem" in Horace's Ars Poetica: morphology or looks or what exactly?

Horatius describes a "combined animal" with human's head, horse's neck, bird's feathers and fish's rear end. This creature ends in a fish: instead of legs it presumably has a fishtail. No details of ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
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Who are Maecenas' atavi?

They are Etruscans. Atavi here does not mean any specific ancestor (i.e. pater abavi), but in general "ancestors." Horace makes the connection explicit later (Odes 3.29.1): Tyrrhena regum ...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes

Why would avoiding olive oil be a negative thing?

It is easy to forget how different cultural assumptions can be. Nowadays, a bath is for hygienic purposes, and private. For the Romans, though, a visit to the baths was social and cultural; the actual ...
Tim Lymington's user avatar
7 votes

Horace quotes a Greek proverb in Ars Poetica, what does it mean?

cnread has already ably translated the proverb but I wanted to unpack Brink’s observation that “one might note however that the proverb makes better sense in Lucian's context than in H's and Lucian ...
Penelope's user avatar
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5 votes

Origin of "seize the day" as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

Just a brief comment on the verb carpo - here's a screenshot of the entry in the OLD: So, carpo as "seize" is even in the OLD. It makes sense - if time fleets (or runs or flies), you may want to ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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4 votes
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What was "ultra terminum" translated to from Horace's poem?

The notes on Perseus hint at the answer. For Horace to be ultra terminum (probably) means he is beyond the boundary of his farm, i.e. he is wandering in the Sabine forest. It's essentially the same ...
cmw's user avatar
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3 votes
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On the word order of "Sapere aude"

Do not read too much into word order in poetry. The metric constraints on language distort the word order quite a bit. Not all freedom is lost, but it is difficult to see what was the author's design ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes
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Understanding a sacrifice in Horace's carmen 1.5

This is how it is read. But as for the “sacrificial” tradition, it is not a sacrifice but a votive offering in a tradition still practised in many parts of the Latin-speaking world. You promise God ...
Martin Kochanski's user avatar
2 votes

Origin of "seize the day" as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

The question is misconceived: 'Seize the day' isn't a mistranslation at all. This is an example of the perennial problem for any translator, that of transforming style and idiom into language that is ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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2 votes

"Purissimum penem" in Suetonius's Life of Horace

Yes, Horace, the man who is the purest penis. The word penis when applied to a person indicated someone given to wanton impulses, especially of a sexual nature. For example, from the Satire of Persius:...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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1 vote

What does "quibus intemptata nites" (Odes 1.5.10–11) mean?

Miseri es pobre o miserable. quibus es un dativo, que significa para quienes/ a quién/ para quien. intemptata declina de intentatus que es adj de 1ra clase y verbo pasivo. Por lo cuál se puede llegar ...
ACHM's user avatar
  • 21

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