7

You are right that cum...tum can be correlated to mean something like "as...so," but by extension this can be used for "X and especially Y." In fact, the description of this usage corresponds pretty exactly to what Lewis and Short describes in meaning (3): 3 As correlative with a preceding cum, introducing particular after a universal or ...


6

Cum...tum can also just be a way of saying 'not only...but also (instead of non solum/tantum...sed etiam) or, as here, since it corresponds to τε...καί in the Greek, 'both...and' (instead of et...et). 'Into other matters' (ceteris de rebus) corresponds to τά...ἄλλα in the Greek; in the English, it looks as though 'withal' is meant to cover ceteris de rebus ...


3

I can't start from the Greek original but, as a translated piece, the first of these seems a bit mechanical, and I prefer the second for style (it's a little shorter, too). This edit has been a long time in coming, but for what it's worth: An opinion on "the quality of the Latin" must take into account various ideas of what that might mean. A principal ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible