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26 votes
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Does "ad" have its origin in Hebrew/Semitic languages?

No, the similarity is almost certainly accidental. This kind of coincidental similarity is pretty common, especially in short words like ad. Latin ad "to, near, at" has cognates in several other ...
TKR's user avatar
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12 votes
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Why did Hieronymus choose to use Latin tenses that don't exist in Hebrew when translating for the Vulgata?

I have two thoughts about this. First, the thing to keep in mind here is that different languages use different tenses differently. In English, for example, I'd use the present tense followed by the ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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11 votes
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Why study a classical language?

Does learning a classical language help to improve one's mastery of other languages (and how much beyond word etymology)? As you've noted, most classical language teaching is 'head-on' (explicit, ...
dbmag9's user avatar
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8 votes

What are the conventions for transcribing Semitic languages into Greek?

In the oldest stratum of loan words Semitic t and k are generally represented by τ and κ, while the emphatic stops ṭ and q are represented by θ and χ. Witness the names of the letters tau and theta. ...
fdb's user avatar
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8 votes

Does any Greek word have a geminate consonant after a long vowel?

There are quite a few, actually. Just to add some more examples: ἥττων "less" πράττω "do" (impv. πρᾶττε shows the length) πλήττω "strike" μᾶλλον "more" ἤλλαγμαι, pf. m./p. of ἀλλάττω "exchange" ...
TKR's user avatar
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8 votes
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Does any Greek word have a geminate consonant after a long vowel?

There is the word γλῶσσα and a great number of other words derived from it. Here is a list of words containing -ωσσ-, giving more examples.
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes

Is the Abrahamic god ever named in Classical-era Latin or Greek?

The Wikipedia article on Tetragrammaton gives a long list of examples from Greek and Latin in early manuscripts and patristic writing. The overwhelming majority use "Lord", but a few use proper ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 3,898
6 votes
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Etymology of exostra/ἐξώστρα

Yes, it comes from ἐξ + ὠθέω. The suffix is -trā, which forms nouns with usually but not always instrumental meanings. (It's related to the more common instrumental suffix -tron, and in fact in ...
TKR's user avatar
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6 votes
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Gen 1:28 only animals that move or all living beings?

(This is an answer about the meaning of the original Hebrew phrase, since the OP suggested in comments that such an answer would be useful.) As the question indicates, the Hebrew phrase being ...
TKR's user avatar
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5 votes

From which Greek dialect did Hebrew borrow *awēr* "air"?

The Greek ἀήρ seems to have entered (post-Biblical) Hebrew via Aramaic ʼwwyr. Syriac Aramaic also has the more Greek-looking form ʼʼr. The replacement of an intervocalic glottal stop by a semi-vowel (...
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes
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Why choose σ versus σσ in Hebrew loans?

Note: this answer is pure speculation (or original research, if you're feeling generous), not backed up by any scholarly references. Neither Varro nor I marked vowel length in our Hebrew and Aramaic ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Identifying a type of dog transliterated from Latin to Hebrew

-ico- is a regular suffix forming an adjective from a noun. mĕlicus melodious. mĕlicae sonores, tuneful sounds (Lucretius) More promising is mēles, also mēlis, -is f. also mælis, a badger or pine ...
Hugh's user avatar
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4 votes

Understanding the use of "regnavit"

This is really an issue with Hebrew. The Hebrew "tenses" do not map into Greek/Latin/English tenses in a straight-forward manner, and their uses even seem to vary depending on whether they're being ...
varro's user avatar
  • 4,628
3 votes

Why choose σ versus σσ in Hebrew loans?

I think that TKR's remark on the occasional spellings with υ may also be relevant to the matter. Note that in Ἰησοῦς with the single σ, the the ש is in the vicinity of a rounded vowel. Also ...
varro's user avatar
  • 4,628
3 votes
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Is the Abrahamic god ever named in Classical-era Latin or Greek?

The oldest Greek transcription I've found is from Diodorus of Sicily (The Library of History I.94.2): παρὰ δὲ τοῖς Ἰουδαίοις Μωυσῆν τὸν Ἰαὼ ἐπικαλούμενον θεόν Among the Jews, Moses [attributed his ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
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Pronunciation of Jehovæ

If you wanted to pronounce it like: English scientific or legal Latin, it would be pronounced "jah-HOE-vee" If you wanted to give it an Ecclesiastical or modern-Roman pronunciation, it would be ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 3,898
2 votes

Understanding the use of "regnavit"

Sometimes (many times) Jerome does not translate from Hebrew but from the Septuagint. Ps 96 (97), 1 : Ὁ κύριος ἐβασίλευσεν = regnavit Ps 92 (93), 1 : Ὁ κύριος ἐβασίλευσεν = regnavit Modern Bibles ...
Martha Enriquez's user avatar

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