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4

In many Greek meters there's a rule by which a long syllable can be replaced with two shorts ("resolution"). This is what has happened with προσεκύνει in this line: the first two short syllables count as one long. Dividing the line into feet we get θεῶν ἀλη|θῶς προσεκύνει | τε κἀτίμα where the metrical scheme is ˘ ¯ ˘ ¯ | ¯ ˘˘ ˘ ¯ | ˘ ¯ ¯ ¯ The ...


5

The deep knowledge entailing understanding (think "carnal k." in English) and what you get from a detailed investigation is γνῶσις (gnôsis). A more intellectual variant entailing expertise is ἐπιστήμη (epistēmē); mastery (from "standing on it"). An acquired knowledge, so, something you learn, education, is μάθημα, μάθησις (mathēma, ...


9

The forms with π are Ionic, which is a dialect that drops word-initial aspiration. It does not normally turn φ into π, but in this case the φ is a result of the π of the preposition ἀπό interacting with the initial aspiration of ἵημι. The normal active present indicative third person singular in Attic is ἀφίησι(ν) or ἀφιεῖ.


9

It's not quite clear, but more likely ὄργια (and its rarer singular ὄργιον) are unrelated to the family of ὀργή "anger" / ὀργίζω "to anger", and are instead from the root of ἔργον "act, deed" (making them cognate with English work). The argument is based on semantics, since the shift "act" to "ritual act, rite&...


14

διδαχή is indeed built on διδάσκω, though without the inchoative infix -σκ-: the root is διδαχ-, as can be seen in the aorist ἐδίδαξα, and -σκ- is one of those infixes that only show up in the present. The reduplication, in this case, indicates a causative (the original verb is the unattested-in-the-present *δάω 'to learn', though it does show up in the ...


8

αὔρας is accusative plural: "the sea drinks the breezes." (And in Anacreon's poetic dialect, I think that he would have the genitive singular as -ης. -ας after ρ is Attic.)


4

I'm abusing the answer space since there is no option in comments for this. The full, finessed, Beekes 2010 dictionary (vI) has I am only including it to display the variants in dialects, which Beekes uses to deadly effect, when it comes to Pre-Greek, his forte. A healing deity is not unexpected to have been inherited from the sophisticated earlier ...


6

Red alert: the name-doctor site is fanciful/crank, full of erroneous folk etymology. So the Λουκᾶς from Λευκός path is basically fraudulent. So I can (only) firmly exclude the Greek connection. For the record, the Greek wikidictionary entry traces the name to Latin. The Hellenistic name is not attested before the 2nd century BC in texts or tombstones; so ...


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