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5

It's not the case that all Greek verbs with thematic presents form thematic aorists, nor that all verbs with athematic presents form athematic aorists. There are exceptions both ways: for example γιγνώσκω, ἔγνων, but on the other hand δείκνυμι, ἔδειξα. Smyth §687 gives a list of the first type of verbs. As with many common Greek verbs, this is an ...


5

As best I can tell, this is due to a mild case of suppletion. In Classical Greek, the verb system hadn't gotten as thoroughly regularized as it was in e.g. Latin (with its four-and-a-half nicely-delineated conjugations); different systems of the "same" verb could come from different Proto-Indo-European constructions, like with πείθω's two different ...


3

The earliest example of rhyme in Greek that I was able to find is from Gorgias, who deliberately used rhyme in his rhetoric: "In the fifth century BC the sophist Gorgias used such blatant rhyme effcts that the audience, anticipating the rhymes, shouted them out in advance..." Michael McKie An example of Gorgias' use of rhyme is quoted in ...


0

Well, μολὼν λαβέ is a participle with an imperative, so literally it's translated as: "Having come, take" μολὼν is the masculine singular nominative aorist active participle, which Latin lacks. λαβέ is a simple imperative. So, if you want to stick closer to the grammar of the Greek, perhaps: ventus, accipe If you want something closer to the ...


6

In the case you mention, πλήθει is actually the dative singular of πλῆθος. This is the standard declension for neuter 3rd declension nouns ending in vowel + sigma, as indicated on this page with the model of "τέλος." It is a dative of respect modifying ἄπειρος, as the translation accurately captures: "infinite in number."


7

It isn't dual; it's dative singular. The dative is a dative of respect and depends on the adjective ἄπειρος. Therefore, the phrase ἄπειρος...πλήθει means 'limitless in (with respect to) magnitude/extent/quantity.'


7

A fragment quoted by Athenaeus preserves an elided form of φίλημι: ἔγω δὲ φίλημ᾽ ἀβροσύναν, καὶ μοι τὸ λάμπρον ἔρος ἀελίω καὶ τὸ κάλον λέλογχεν. These lines also appear, in a slightly different version, in P.Oxy. 1787 fr. 1, a papyrus that contained, among other things, line endings from the "Tithonus poem". This is fragment 58 in the Loeb ...


13

In Greek compounds, if a stem that begins with rho is preceded by an element that ends in a simple vowel (not a diphthong), the rho is doubled. Likewise, in inflected forms where a simple vowel is added before initial rho. Or, as Smyth, Greek grammar §80 puts it: An initial ρ is doubled when a simple vowel is placed before it in inflection or composition. ...


7

For the doubled "r," that is a spelling convention dating back to Ancient Greek, inherited by Botanical Latin - preferred, but optional. Reference Botanical Latin (4th ed.) by William T. Stearn (p. 261). For Botanical Latin, any consistent, intelligible style of pronunciation is acceptable, with some preferred conventions. Refer to Botanical Latin ...


2

I came across this sentence in Plato (Symposium 206c): τίκτειν δὲ ἐν μὲν αἰσχρῷ οὐ δύναται, ἐν δὲ τῷ καλῷ. And it cannot beget on the ugly, but on the beautiful. This μέν...δέ sentence omits the verb (δύναται) in the second part of the sentence and uses δέ to make up for it. So your third example sentence, with a non-final δέ, seems to be permitted in ...


3

Sure. Some examples: ὄψ 'voice', cf. Skt. vacati 'say' ὤψ 'eye', cf. Lat. oculus χέρνιψ 'basin for washing hands', from root of νίζω 'wash', cf. Skt. nenekti 'id.' λείπω 'leave', cf. Lat. linquō ἀμείβω 'exchange', cf. Lat. migrō σέβομαι 'revere', cf. Skt. tyajati 'abandon' νείφει 'snow', cf. Lat nix, nivis (I'm listing thematic verbs here even though one ...


5

Pronunciation Below you can see the vowel lengths marked by L&S and by OLD. Note that OLD doesn't cover post-Classical vocabulary. (In this table L&S = the online L&S via Perseus; OLD = the 1st edition of the OLD consulted by hand; Gaffiot = the 2016 online edition via Logeion.uchicago.edu.) Vowel in penultimate syllable |---------------------|--...


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