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One possibility is Hesychius again, more specifically: <ἐπάβολος>· ἐπιτυχών So the word would mean more like "successful" than "expert", but maybe as a stretch… though seriously, if that is how this came about, the stretch is totally unwarranted in that tatter. Anyways, at that point one might supplement ἐπαβόλ' ἦσ[θα. It must needs be ἐπαβόλ'/ἐπάβολ'...


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All of your translations look good to me! Some of these words have other common meanings, like hylē meaning "forest", but these are reasonable technical terms that I wouldn't be surprised to find in Aristotle or the like. However, if you're going for the Ancient Greek aesthetic, I'd use the letter y instead of u for hypsilon when it's not part of a ...


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As announced in his comment, AlexB got ahold of Puglia 2007, sent it to the mods, and our tricipitous mod forwarded it to me. I read it, and I can now answer that part of this question. So, with a lot of pretty solid arguments, the article proposes the following collage of P.Oxy. 1787 fragments (where 87(13) and 87(14) have swapped numbers): From this, we ...


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In the comments, Alex B added another example: φώς "man", but φῶς "light" (that is, φάος with Attic contraction). As he put it, "this shows btw the importance of morae for stress placement".


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That same Ferrari book, had I checked further, would have yielded the following note: In comparison with the reconstruction given in Ferrari 2005b, the text as given here takes into account two contributions of Puglia: a) the combination of F 60 (= P.Halle 3) with fr. 3, hence the necessity of postulating a five-line lacuna between F 86 and F 60 and of ...


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Greek verbs have six principal parts, meaning that to be able to conjugate a verb in all of its tenses, you need to know all six different roots with their conjugations. Sometimes the roots used in each principal part are identical (e.g. with λύω), sometimes similar (e.g. λείπω), and sometimes (as you already acknowledge) entirely different (e.g. λέγω). Here ...


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Welcome to the site! I'm afraid there isn't exactly one way to rule them all. But there are various phonological rules by which you can guess the roots of a significant number of verbs. For example, -(i)sk, -nu, and -an are common present suffixes, so cut them off if you want to find the root. The -an- suffix is in the present manthanô (root math-); -nu is ...


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