New answers tagged

3

I've long relied on the free Gentium typeface, which has a simply gorgeous, highly readable polytonic Greek font, with diacriticals that I've always found quite easy to distinguish, both on the printed page and on the computer screen. I used to have a custom stylesheet to display all Greek text on the Perseus website in Gentium, because it's much easier on ...


6

W. Sidney Allen's famous Vox Graeca, which is well worth the time of anyone with a more-than-casual interest in Greek pronunciation, has three-and-a-half pages' worth of things to say about the subject, which I will attempt to summarise. It's uncontroversial that from quite early in the Archaic period through the late 4th century BCE, ζ represented [zd] in ...


5

There's no distinction in Classical times. When the Greek alphabet was standardized by Euclid the Archon (around 400 BCE), the sounds of earlier /ej/ and earlier /eː/ (likewise /ow/, /oː/) had merged completely. Since they were pronounced the same, Eucleides decided to write them the same. From that point onward, there was no distinction in Greek writing of ...


2

I often found also the version πύξ λάξ δοντάξ, which seems a modernization. I also thought to have found the version πύξ λάξ ὀδὰξ, but later wasn't able to find anything else than entries regarding the common word formation of this terms, this could be a likely way the last term was introduced if it is spurious. πύξ λάξ seems to be a common frase in modern ...


4

μάχαιρα means "knife, dirk, dagger, short sword". It seems more suitable for your purpose than φάσγανον or ξίφος, both of which mean "sword" rather than "knife". (There is ξιφίδιον, a diminutive of the latter word, which does mean "small sword or knife", but using a diminutive in a compound is a bit unwieldy.) So ...


0

OK, let's fit a spline all the way to the sublimely ridiculous. The disk-thrower is discobolus, δισκοβόλος, with activity noun δισκοβολία. In my sense, the best slayer-knife word is φάσγανον, and its expert thrower φασγανοβόλος, so "fasganobolus" indulging in notional "fasganoboly"? There might be incidental insights at the top level ...


0

This is a cut-and-paste answer, but I hope it's of some help. A Greek proverbs site confirms the Wiki entry " www.gnomikologikon.gr › catquotes " πύξ, λάξ, δάξ. Επιγραφή που περιέγραφε πώς εκδιώκονται οι άσχετοι από τα Ελευσίνια Μυστήρια. And two other sites say it comes from Oppian γνύξ, πύξ, λάξ, Οpp. Η. 4, 60, τgl. Jac. & Ὀππ. Ἁλ. 4. 60. ...


11

The particular words you were looking for are ἢ στέφος ἢ θάνατον ("either the crown or death," in the accusative case; θάνατος would be the nominative case if detached from its original context). As for the provenance, the source seems to be the epitaph of a boxer named Agathos Daimon or Kamelos. The Ancient Olympics site gives the Greek text of ...


4

If you don't want to have to change keyboards and just want to be able to type Greek characters occasionally, you might find it more useful to install WinCompose, a free app that turns the AltGr key into a Compose key. That means I can type AltGr * S and I get Σ, for example. It adds a whole load of other codes (like AltGr a - → ā or AltGr a e → æ and a ...


5

What you did added a Greek keyboard (a keyboard used in Greece) for writing Latin characters. To write in Greek characters, you should click "Add a preferred language" instead. After the Greek language is installed, you should add the "Greek Polytonic" keyboard (assuming you're learning Ancient Greek). The keyboard allows for acute, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included