14 votes
Accepted

In Vulgate Lk 22: 62, "Et egressus foras Petrus flevit amare.", it says. How to understand "flevit amare"?

Amāre indeed means to love, being the infinitive of the verb amo. Here, however, the word being used is amārē which is an adverb that is derived from the adjective amarus which means bitter. L&S ...
d_e's user avatar
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14 votes
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Why didn't Latin grammarians ever rectify their Latin mistranslation of "(ptōsis) aitiatike" as "accusare"?

It's not at all clear why Greek grammarians decided to call the accusative πτῶσις αἰτιατική in the first place. The accusative doesn't generally express "cause" in any sense. Going by the ...
TKR's user avatar
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11 votes

Classical Latin translations from extant Greek sources (or vice versa)

Catullus 51 (Ille mi par esse deo videtur…) is a fairly literal translation of a very famous poem by Sappho (φαίνεταί μοι κῆνος ἴσος θέοισιν).
fdb's user avatar
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7 votes

Classical Latin translations from extant Greek sources (or vice versa)

Parts of Plato's Timaeus were translated into Latin by Cicero which can be found in his Timaeus. It worth noting that Luis Vives mentioned this work of Cicero as a model for translation to be studied. ...
d_e's user avatar
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6 votes
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What does ἀπάλαιστος mean in Quint. Inst. 9 4.56

As Alex B mentions in the comments, the Loeb version reads slightly differently: Idque Cicero optime videt ac testatur frequenter se quod numerosum sit quaerere ut magis non arrhythmum, quod esset ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes

Kyrie Eleison is Greek, but what is the proper Latin Translation?

It's not very common to see this sentence in full, translated in liturgy. The closest, most common, full translation I can think of would be: Miserere nostri, Domine E.g. in the Te Deum. It is much ...
Rafael's user avatar
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5 votes

How to find the transliteration of a (Attic) Greek word?

There isn't really such a thing as the transliteration of a Greek word—there are a few different transliteration conventions in common use. The main one you'll see is a kind of informal standard ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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5 votes

Classical Latin translations from extant Greek sources (or vice versa)

I suspect that you may be looking for a translation made in Antiquity, but I couldn't resist posting a few scans from this book I have here:
Cerberus's user avatar
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4 votes

Classical Latin translations from extant Greek sources (or vice versa)

While you can read parts of Andronicus' translation side by side with the Odyssey, two other monumental (pun intended) works stand out here. The first is the Res Gestae Divi Augusti, Augustus' ...
cmw's user avatar
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3 votes

Latin term for 'dramaturge' using the root 'δρᾶμα'

As Draconis mentioned in a comment, this isn't a common word in Classical Latin, but you get it in Late Antique Latin enough, and enough of the Classical Latin authors we have knew Greek, that ...
cmw's user avatar
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2 votes

How to find the transliteration of a (Attic) Greek word?

You probably want beta code. This was the default way of representing Greek since the 80s, and it was even used by the TLG, the default ancient Greek digital search tool. You can see TLG's official ...
cmw's user avatar
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1 vote

What's the Difference Between αχρι and μεχρι?

It is hard to see any semantic differences between μέχρι(ς) and ἄχρι(ς) as prepositions and conjunctions. However we can detect a difference between them as adverbs: ἄχρι means completely; μέχρι means ...
SK_'s user avatar
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1 vote
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μολὼν λαβέ but in Latin

Well, μολὼν λαβέ is a participle with an imperative, so literally it's translated as: "Having come, take" μολὼν is the masculine singular nominative aorist active participle, which Latin ...
Colin's user avatar
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