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24

It sounds like you're talking about this incident involving the Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund at the Council of Constance in 1414: …A similar anecdote is told of the German Emperor Sigismund. When presiding at the Council of Constance, he addressed the assembly in a Latin speech, exhorting them to eradicate the schism of the Hussites. 'Videte Patres,' he ...


18

The Greeks were keenly aware of dialectal differences, and long before the Romans came on the scene, the Greeks had already categorized their dialects into three or four common groups: Ionic (with Attic a sub-group), Doric, Aeolic, and Arcadian. A great, free introduction to this is Buck's Greek Dialects (or here; the third edition is still under copyright). ...


13

In a recent paper (included in The Latin of the Grammarians), I have made the point that Latin grammarians, unlike their Greek predecessors, did not expressly stress the uninflectional nature of adverbs, and this may be due to the fact that they observed some sort of declension in some types of adverbs (not only those derived of adjectives -doctus > docte-, ...


12

First person singular (laudo) appears to be most common Marcus Terentius Varro (116-27 BC) wrote De Lingua Latina, which survives in partial, corrupted form, but which provides valuable testimony on this matter. In Book 6, chapter 5, he speaks of "derived words" and uses the first-person present active indicative form as the "basic form": Primigenia ...


10

Well, there is some fairly simple evidence that a sequence of two identical short vowels could in some cases be treated as equivalent to a single long vowel, namely that the former can contract into the latter: e.g. ĭĭt ~ īt, nĭhĭl ~ nīl. This does not necessarily imply that the pronunciations were identical, of course, but it does show that the two ...


9

Here's a short answer so far - no one knows. Brandenburg 2013 writes that "In non-technical contexts, ptôsis refers among other things to the ‘falling of dice’ (Pl. Resp. 10,604c6; Aristot. Eth. Eud. 9,1247a21-23). In the grammatical terminology it refers to the forms of nominal declension. This, however, renders the metaphor of falling unintelligible, ...


8

As far as I can see, the Roman grammarians did not consider the adverbial -e to be a case ending. On the other hand, from the standpoint of historical linguistics most Latin adverbs are indeed fossilised case forms of adjectives. The “adverbial -e” is in fact of two-fold origin. i-stem adjectives like facilis use the accusative singular neuter as an adverb (...


7

The OLD provides several examples of verba meaning "verb" (as opposed to vocabulum or nomen, "noun." Aside from two instances in Varro: Hor.Ars 235; nec a ~is modo, sed ab nominibus quoque deriuata sunt quaedam, ut a Cicerone 'sullaturit' Quint. Inst. 8.3.32; in ~is...sermonis uis est 9.4.26; Vel.gram.in G.L.7.57; ut pro ~is habentibus patiendi figuram ...


7

In the history of linguistics, Protagoras (5th century BCE) is assumed to be the first scholar ever who classified sentences into sentence types. Naturally, we don't have any textual evidence except Diogenes Laertius who says the following: διεῖλέ τε τὸν λόγον πρῶτος εἰς τέτταρα, εὐχωλήν, ἐρώτησιν, ἀπόκρισιν, ἐντολήν: 8 [54] ῾οἱ <:>ὲ εἰς ἑπτά, διήγησιν,...


6

It appears that you are correct that a casus is seen as a kind of metaphor for a noun "falling into place." Maurus Servius Honoratus (4-5th century AD) has an important quote that makes two points that bear on your question: Casus plerique quattuor esse dicunt, auferentes nominativum et vocativum, qui similis est nominativo. ideo autem auferunt ...


6

Supine means flat on your back, lying down, It is the final 'oblique' form; it is the extremely inflected (leaning) part of the Verb and is usually in the last column of the principal parts, In later Grammars (that certainly includes medieval Grammars) 'oblique cases' and 'declension' are only used to describe the Voc., Acc., Gen., Dat., Abl., Loc., (X ...


6

I'm not sure hypercorrection is what you're looking for, but if not, have a look at Petronius' Satyricon. The work poked fun at a few of the nouveau riche (Trimalchio is chiefly lampooned), including their bad grammar. I only quote from one book, as the night is late and the author gives examples: Another point, the admirably clever adaptation of the ...


5

(First of all, here's how I'm interpreting the text: comment if this is significantly different from yours.) nihil in natura clarius quam quod unumquodque ens sub aliquo attributo debeat concipi Nothing in nature is clearer than the fact that every individual essence should be imagined as underlying some attribute. The explanation is actually ...


5

W. Sidney Allen in Vox Latina says that various grammarians such as Quintilian stated the rules quite unambiguously (although he also writes that "there is some controversy about the nature of the historical accent"). However, even if we didn't have precise statements from ancient grammarians, the rules could pretty easily deduced simply from the reflexes ...


4

I disagree with LaFeeVerte, and would like to posit that aliquis can function as an adjective. A quote from one of my favorite sources, Bennett's Latin Grammar: Aliquis may be used adjectively, and (occasionally) aliquī substantively. Unfortunately, no examples are provided to show its adjectival use, but the fact that it can be used as an ...


3

I've never come across any kind of systematic study of speech errors, but what might be called the locus classicus for this kind of thing is the well-known Catullus LXXXIV, in which the poet mocks Arrius for misplaced aitches: Chommoda dicebat, si quando commoda vellet   dicere, et insidias Arrius hinsidias, et tum mirifice sperabat se esse ...


3

Generally, the answer is no. The adjective 'aliqui, aliquae, aliquod' should be used instead. That being said, however, Virgil (Aeneid, book II, line 48) seems to use 'aliquis' as an adjective, saying 'aut aliquis latet error'. Here both 'aliquis' and 'error' are in the nominative, which suggests that you can use 'aliquis' as an adjective. But perhaps '...


3

You can compose your own from Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Grammarians_of_Latin but it is as you say a bit indigestible even in chronological sequence: Antonius Rufus (grammarian) (Dionysius Thrax Τέχνη γραμματική 150 BC) Lucius Aelius Stilo Praeconinus Philologist 100BC Marcus Fabius Quintilianus 100AD Institutio oratoria Sulpicius ...


3

Certainly the concept of subordination existed in antiquity; the Greek grammarians used ὑποβάλλω or ὑποτάττω to mean "to subordinate syntactically", and derived from this the term ὑποτακτικόν "subjunctive" (because the subjunctive mostly occurs in subordinate clauses). The Latin terms subordinare, subiungere, subiunctivum are calques of these. They also had ...


3

Were it such a thing, it would be modus interrogativus, since modus is masculine. Lewis & Short II.B.3 contains the examples for using modus as a classification for verbs: In gram., a form of a verb, a voice or mood: “in verbo fiunt soloecismi per genera, tempora, personas, modos, etc.,” Quint. 1, 5, 41: patiendi modus (the passive voice) ... ...


3

Allen and Greenough (504) say that a gerund in the genitive can take an accusative object, "especially a neuter pronoun or a neuter adjective used substantivally". Examples: nulla causa iusta cuiquam esse potest contra patriam arma capiendi (Cic. Phil. 2 53) artem vera ac falsa diiudicandi (Cic. Or. 2.157) They say that such constructions are rare ...


2

sūs has a long vowel, but the other cases (suis etc.) have a short vowel in the stem, so I suppose the genitive plural suum would look and sound just like the acc. sing. m. and nom./acc. s. n. of suus. But otherwise sūs and suus sound quite different.


2

The Romans denoted the year by naming the consuls (though one can see that it might have been rather awkward when the second of two consecutive days coincided with the appointment of new incumbents), until the more convenient system of anno domini was introduced to denote successive years from the birth of Christ, a far neater arrangement which ...


2

articulus ... Hence, a short clause, Dig. 36, 1, 27; also, a single word, ib. 35, 1, 4: articulus Est praesentis temporis demonstrationem continet, ib. 34, 2, 35: [Lewis and Short(TUFTS)] membrum II B 3 Of speech, a member or clause of a sentence: quae Graeci κόμματα et κῶλα nominant, nos recte incisa et membra dicimus, Cic. Or. 62, 211; cf. Auct....


1

To build your library of grammarians here is: Alexandre de Villedieu (born around 1175) Grammar Leonine (internally rhymed hexameter) grammar derived from Priscian (Priscianus caesariensis ( fl. AD 500)), and Donatus, Aelius Donatus (fl. mid-fourth century AD) not Priscian of Lydia (Priscianus Lydus; fl. 6th century), one of the last of the Neoplatonists.] ...


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