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2

When I first saw this text it too struck me as unclear and unnatural. The first problem has since been resolved, the second however remains. Another reply mentions Foster himself translating it as 'Insert your card--scidulam--so you can access the operations allowed.' - that's certainly not an exact rendering of what the Latin says, which is instead: "...


19

The source of this Latin ATM message, as confirmed is a few profiles (such as this one from the Catholic Herald and this one from The Telegraph) is the lately-deceased Reginald Foster, who was arguably one of the greatest Latin speakers of the past century. The Vatican Diaries, pg. 196 quotes Foster's own translation: The elevator whirred quietly to the top ...


4

With respect to (3) (4), I think it is very tempting to have congnosco to denote an active action that the user should do. So my guess it can be rendered identify or more freely on the context select. I read ratio faciunda as method of operation (method to be done). So the user is required to insert the card so that he can select a method from several ...


5

The message is indeed hard to parse because of the broad meanings of ratio, facere, and cognoscere. I am not sure whether there can be a very solid and authoritative answer, so I will just share my view. I think the future imperative is simply used for sollemnity. I would not understand it referring to the future but just promoting the register of the text ...


4

According to Wiktionary, succubus evolved in Middle English from the Latin word succuba, one who lies under. The plural is given in the aforementioned Wiktionary as succubi or succubuses. Personally, I've usually only seen the former used (or maybe I just prefer that plural). Incubus, however, came from the late Latin word incubus which evolved from incubo, ...


8

'There is'/'there are' in indirect speech is just esse, as in this passage from Pliny the Younger's letters (1.11.1): at hoc ipsum scribe, nihil esse quod scribas, vel solum illud unde incipere priores solebant: 'si vales, bene est; ego valeo.' Yet write this very thing, that there is nothing.... In indirect speech, there's always some risk of a loss of ...


8

Christicole is a medieval misspelling, reflecting the way vernacular pronunciation had changed in some parts of Europe. Christicolae is the corrected spelling. In classical pronunciation, ae was a diphthong, pronounced like English long ī. During the Middle Ages, in much of Europe, the ae phoneme altered and became identical to e, pronounced like English ...


8

"-cola" is a productive suffix that can be used for the pretty wide array of meanings of colo, -ere: inhabit (caeli-cola: inhabitant of heaven) cultivate (agri-cola: cultivator of fields = farmer) worship (Iunoni-cola: worshipper of Juno) In this case, the third meaning is intended, so we get Christicola, -ae, a "worshipper of Christ," ...


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