15

Welcome to the site! Non ministrari, sed ministrare (VG Mt 20,28) Is a well-attested phrase with that exact meaning. It literally means not to be served but to serve. The context is Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew saying that He (the Son of man) came not to be served but to serve. Update: it is (arguably) a common choice for mottos. Besides the American ...


15

Although it's possible that the verb est has been omitted here, as Adam says, I find it more likely that the sentence really is equivalent to Iūlius nōn sōlus habitat, sed cum Aemiliā et cum magnā familiā in vīllā habitat. Latin regulary uses adjectives in the nominative modifying the subject (and also in the accusative modifying the direct object) where ...


11

This is an example of an indirect question, e.g. I asked where he was. I know what he did. I told you what I would do. Or, as in this case: "He didn't know what he was writing." This construction takes the subjunctive with the usual sequence of tenses. In this case, since the main verb (nesciebat) is imperfect indicative, and therefore secondary ...


11

Do not only look for “movement” when you see in used with the accusative. In is very versatile and has a lot of meanings that cannot be easily summed up in a few words. A good dictionary will describe them, such as Lewis & Short. Under “II. With acc.” look past letters A (“In space”) and B (“In time”) for C: In other relations, in which an aiming at, ...


10

Graecus, -a, -um is an adjective “Greek”, put in the ablative plural Graecis to agree with the ablative plural noun oppidis: “In (the) Greek towns.” Italia is a noun “Italy”; Italiae is the genitive singular: “In (the) gardens of Italy.” Genitive nouns don’t show any agreement in Latin, so only hortis is marked for ablative plural. The same goes for “In ...


9

There would of course be many possibilities, but I believe the verb sinere comes closest to “let.” It can be used in various ways – with an AcI, with ut – but the most compact form would be a bare subjunctive. “Let me love” then would be: Sine amem – and while I did not find that specific expression in the literature, I did find in Plautus' Casina (2,2; ...


7

I would translate as follows. I put it in the plural form since it refers to an organization: Praesentes semper, numquam conspecti There are a lot of words that have to do with seeing, but I chose the word conspecti because the infinitive form has the meaning: to attract attention, to be conspicuous, noticed, observed, distinguished, admired Your ...


7

To express the (apparent) quality of something, only adjectives can be coupled with videri. A few examples from Cicero, respectively De Officiis and Brutus: Cum igitur id, quod utile videtur in amicitia, cum eo, quod honestum est, comparatur... Thus, when what seems useful in friendship is compared with what is virtuous... [...] qui eum sententiis, ...


7

Here is an example using all seven cases in a typical way: Marce, vir feminae panem e furno pistoris Romae dat. Marcus (voc.), the man (nom.) gives a bread (acc.) from the baker's (gen.) oven (abl.) to the woman (dat.) in Rome (loc.). Reason for each case: Marce, vocative: Marcus is being addressed ("Hey Marcus!"), and the vocative is used for ...


7

Henry de Bracton, a medieval English jurist, in his book De Legibus et Consuetudinibus Angliae, defined furtum as follows: … furtum est secundum leges contrectatio rei alienæ fraudulenta animo furandi, invito illo cuius res illa fuerit. … theft is, according to the laws, a deceitful touching of a thing that belongs to someone else with the intent to ...


7

It's the accusative of time, answering the question “how long?” (And not “when?” or “during which time?” – that would call for the ablative.) “I thought myself the happiest of people for so many years.” One might consider the ablative defensible here, which would then answer the question “within which time,” although that would strike me as an unusal choice, ...


7

Typically, Latin dictionaries just lump these uses together, hence your confusion. O (oh) can used with a number of cases other than the vocative when there's no addressing a person. For instance, the OLD entry (s.v. o²) treats them separately (probably because the OLD lexicographers used relevant data from the TLL entry - see below on this). 2.1 with the ...


7

Actually, this is not so much a case of missing esse, but of praedicative use of an adjectival word. Adjectives (solus), but also participles, can be used such that they agree with a nominal group (Iulius), while telling you something about the praedicate as a whole (Iulius non [habitat]), not just about the nominal group. This is also possible in other Indo-...


6

Neither genitive nor ablative: secundum takes the accusative, so the phrase would be secundum legem latam. You can usually find which case a preposition takes from its dictionary entry.


6

Here is another set of examples aimed at the precious bonus points. Now the cases are in the order they are taught here (nom, acc, gen, dat, abl) so as to help memorization; feel free to permute to your local standards. The first example uses only first declension feminines. You can also switch to plural for those endings. Puella uvam amicae vicinae e ...


6

I would say that the original expression Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat can be read in two ways: There is an indirect question: He did not know what he was writing about. There is a relative clause: He did not know the thing about which he was writing. The answer by brianpck covers the first case, and indeed then one would expect scriberet. In the ...


6

If the thing being bought is just some thing, then the correct gender is neuter. It is used for things of unspecific gender, whereas masculine would be used for people of unspecific gender. If you use quem, you are asking whom Julius is buying. Unless he is shopping for slaves, go with quid to ask what he is buying. If it could be slaves or something else, ...


6

The conjunction ut/ne is a general way to express a purpose (also called the ut finale, because it is only one of the uses of ut). The supine in -um is a very specialized form used only to express the purpose of a movement. The supine is used with all kinds of verbs of motion: Leones spectatum venimus. We came to see the lions. Romam iit auxilium rogatum. ...


6

Briefly looking on PHI, I've found a simple genitive of description does the trick. Pictura canis: A picture of a dog Statua Caesaris: A statue of Caesar As far as using the possessive adjective, it wouldn't denote the same possible meaning as it does in English. pictura mea: My picture (that I own) pictura mei: A picture of me (commonly said as 'my picture' ...


5

Both orders are correct; in general, Latin word order is very flexible. But there is some difference in terms of information structure and pragmatics. Placing Rhenus first in the second sentence has the effect of marking it as a new topic for this sentence. You could capture this in English by saying, "As for the Rhine, where is that?" It's harder to say ...


5

Overview | ---------------|------------------|--------------------------| | Case ordering | Origin | Popular in | | ---------------|------------------|--------------------------| | N-G-D-Ac-V-Abl | Antiquity | USA, Italy, Greece, | | | | Germany, Sweden, Russia* | | ---------------|--------...


5

According to the entry in Lewis and Short, the accusative often refers to what was specifically written as "a line" or "a written composition, writing, treatise, book, work, etc." In all the examples they give, the prepositional phrase, de + abl., refers to the subject matter of what was written. Often the accusative is used together with the ablative ...


5

It is up to you whether you use a subordinate clause or a participle construction in Latin. Both is possible! Participle How you use the participle depends a bit on how you word the Latin sentence. I would translate “stepping aside” as alicui decedere, “to give way to someone.” If we do that, it means the subject of the subordinate clause (X came) occurs ...


5

To express the idea of one/two/three/etc. more (of something), you use an ablative to indicate the degree of difference. Therefore, to render 'one more apple' or 'one more battle,' you literally say, 'more apples by one (apple)' or 'more battles by one (battle).' Or, to use the example that tony gives in a comment, you say 'more loaves than yesterday by ...


5

You express it with the present tense. The Latin present cano stands for both the English present "I sing" and the present continuous "I am singing". Only context will determine which English translation is more suitable for cano, but both English tenses can be translated with cano. If you have a specific case where you want to make a ...


5

The same happens with all deponent verbs in Latin. The Latin participle system is defective for a transitive verb like amare:   Active Passive Past — amatus Present amans (amandus) Future amaturus (amandus) The gerundive is not really a participle, although it can play roles similar to the present or future passive participle. I advice against calling ...


5

Indeed the passive voice of alo with the abl. case can mean what you are aiming for. in L&S: Hence in pass. with the abl. = vesci, to be nourished or sustained with or by something, to live or feed upon. It gives classical examples, and this example from the Vulgate (Ex. 16:35): "... hoc cibo aliti sunt ..." Another suggestion: The 4th dec. ...


5

Leaving est implicit is common, especially in succinct sayings like this. Punctuation works differently in different languages and classical Latin had almost none. It is good to remember that all punctuation and capitalization in classical texts are due to much later editors, not the original authors. Supplying a comma makes sense here. To me the most ...


4

Here is an all-masculine attempt, one word per case, plus a verb: Vesperi, Attice, imperator populi iussu regi equum pollicebitur. In the evening, Atticus, the commander, on the people's order, will promise the king a horse. Explanation: Vesperi: Locative of vesper. Attice: Vocative of Atticus, the person to whom the narration is addressed. imperator: ...


4

According to Allen and Greenough, New Latin Grammar, hoc and other demonstrative pronouns are often used in the neuter to refer to entire phrases. Therefore, it's not necessary for them to agree in gender: e. The pronouns hīc , ille , and is are used to point in either direction, back to something just mentioned or forward to something about to be ...


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