10 votes
Accepted

How do I use gerundives of obligation for deponent verbs?

Before we understand the gerundive of a deponent verb, we need to first understand the particples of deponent verbs. Participles of Deponent Verbs Deponent verbs are often described as verbs with &...
user avatar
  • 36.7k
8 votes
Accepted

Can the gerundive be used like an adjective?

Certainly. Allen and Greenough sec. 500: The gerundive is sometimes used, like the present and perfect participles, in simple agreement with a noun:— fortem et cōnservandum virum (Mil. 104), a brave ...
user avatar
  • 28.5k
8 votes
Accepted

How to understand 'quae prosum sola nocendo'?

Nocendo is a gerund (noun) here, not a gerundive (adjective). Therefore, it's active in meaning. It's ablative to show the means by which Juno does good. Quae is f. nom. sing. and refers to Iunonem, ...
user avatar
  • 18k
8 votes

How to analyze and translate "non se luxu neque inertiae corrumpendum dedit" (Sal. Jug. 6)?

Based on the annotations that I've made in my copy of the text, when I've read the Jugurtha in the past, I've analyzed the sentence just as you do, taking corrumpendum as an accusative gerundive ...
user avatar
  • 18k
7 votes
Accepted

When is there a U instead of an E in gerund(ive)?

Weiss writes that "The u-forms are characteristic of legal and archaizing style, e.g. pecuniae repetundae (the recovery of extorted money), and are found in the isolated forms secundus 'following' ...
user avatar
  • 11.2k
7 votes
Accepted

Passives Without Accusatives

Normally, when you passive a verb in Latin, the following happens: Subject becomes a(b(s)) + ablative. Direct object becomes subject. All other constituents remain unchanged. Note that a direct ...
user avatar
  • 18.6k
7 votes
Accepted

Is 'praestandis' in this sentence a gerund (gerundium) or a gerundive (gerundivum)?

The gerund is only used in the singular, so for that reason alone praestandis has to be a gerundive. The gerund is a verbal noun (and as a subject or object is replaced by the infinitive). The ...
user avatar
7 votes

Nunc est bibendum: gerund or gerundive?

I strongly incline to the view that bibendum is a gerundive, not only because it is paired with an unambiguous gerundive, but also because the context demands some kind of obligation, a notion not ...
user avatar
  • 5,160
7 votes

Is there a gerundive of "faciō"?

Yes, there is. A couple of notes: Faciendus (-a, -um) is attested. Perseus gives 21 results of the former. These include several forms of faciendus + [esse] (est, erat, esset) There is also a number ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
7 votes
Accepted

Ethics of Spinoza: producendam

This kind of metonymy is very common in Latin. For a simple example, vir mortuus is literally "a dead man" but can also mean "the death of a man". This is somewhat similar to how ...
user avatar
7 votes

"gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum")

I would not read the genitive and the gerund together. I suggest this reordering and grouping to clarify: …(plus operae) poneremus (in agendo) quam (in scribendo)… ≈ …we would put more work into ...
user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Null expletive objects in Latin? "Cariotae cum ficis certandum habent" (Plin. Ep. 1,8)

Here is one possible way to parse this kind of constructions. (The instance you quote is not unique as the examples below indicate.) Recall that there are two ways to indicate possession: domum habeo ...
user avatar
6 votes

Nunc est bibendum: gerund or gerundive?

This is a synchronic answer, pertaining only to classical Latin, as I believe the use of gerunds and gerundives was subject to some change praeclassically; what is more, they may have once been the ...
user avatar
  • 18.6k
6 votes

What is the difference in meaning/usage between "nasciturus" and "nascendus"?

In his Corso elementare di lingua latina ("Elementary Latin course", 1844), Vincenzo De Angelis deals with this in Volume 1, p. 191: Se il verbo indica azione vi sarà il passivo, come amo ...
user avatar
6 votes

Analysis of sentence "hunc Dātamēs vīnctum ad rēgem dūcendum trādit Mithridātī"

Your understanding is correct. Here, the gerundive as object complement of hunc is equivalent to a purpose clause (= hunc tradit, ut ad regem ducatur). "Ad regem" is simply a prepositional ...
user avatar
  • 5,160
5 votes
Accepted

Can 'non' with gerundive mean both lack of obligation and negative obligation?

The following examples are of the negated gerundive clearly equivalent to a prohibition. The pair faciendum / non faciendum is used to indicate positive and negative obligation, as evidenced by the ...
user avatar
  • 5,160
5 votes
Accepted

How do I say "this must not happen"?

There are three or four impersonal verbs to express what is appropriate, or legal, or obligatory. 1 děcet, it is appropriate 2 dēděcet, it is inapproptiate, unseemly. Ut nobis decet; As seems ...
user avatar
  • 8,457
5 votes

How do I say "this must not happen"?

In my experience many languages confuse lack of desire and desire of the contrary. For example, I would like to be able to say "I don't want coffee" as the negation of "I want coffee", meaning that I ...
user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Sentence with gerund or gerundive and infinitive

The main verb of the clause, datur is impersonal. In English the subject 'it' would be used (though, grammatically speaking, the real subject is the infinitive cognoscere). → '...it isn't given/...
user avatar
  • 18k
5 votes

"gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum")

As pointed out in the previous answers, it seems quite clear that plus...operae is an argument of the verb poneremus. I found that some philologists corrected the text as follows: in agendo plus quam ...
user avatar
  • 6,574
4 votes

When is there a U instead of an E in gerund(ive)?

To clarify a little more. In Gramatica Latina (latin grammar) by Santiago Segura: Participe of passive future: It is also called verbal adjective in -NDUS and gerundive and is formed by adding to ...
user avatar
4 votes

Can the gerundive be used like an adjective?

Quite probably, your invented examples Infans lavandus clamabat and Urbs nobis capienda militiam novam paraverat would sound quite odd to a native speaker of Latin. Note that the attributive use of ...
user avatar
  • 6,574
4 votes
Accepted

Translation: that which was to have been made

Just like your Quod erat demonstrandum example suggests, you definitely need a gerundive form here : quod erat faciendum Depending on the context, you might want to consider facienda (n. pl, "...
user avatar
  • 160
4 votes

Translation help, especially with "cum bello cupiendo"

Your “translation exercise” is a famous (I thought) fragment from Nepos’ “Hannibal” (from De exellentibus ducibus, 2.1): “Nam ut omittam Philippum, quem absens hostem reddidit Romanis, omnium iis ...
user avatar
  • 1,063
4 votes
Accepted

Mihi legendum/legenda est?

The gerundive should be neuter if you just want to say "I need to read". Any other form than singular neuter should only be used when the gerundive modifies a noun. The modified noun can in principle ...
user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Can Gerundives be predicates of Ablative Absolutes?

Yes, the predicate of an ablative absolute can be a gerundive. But the matter is complicated by the question what a real ablative absolute is and what separates it from other constructions. You have ...
user avatar
4 votes

Can a "dative of agent" appear in an Ablative Absolute construction (and, more generally, in a non-verbal context)?

Is this an example? Cicero: sibi enim bene gestae, mihi conservatae rei publicae dat testimonium. Perhaps it can be argued that sibi and mihi are datives of reference, but "agent" seems most ...
user avatar
  • 5,160
4 votes

"gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum")

No, this construction is impossible because it has nominal syntax (hoc domūs tēctum "this house roof") like the English gerund, while the Latin gerund has verbal syntax (not *in hōc ...
user avatar
3 votes

What is the difference in meaning/usage between "nasciturus" and "nascendus"?

I think that the meanings attributed by sumelic to nasciturus and nascendus ("about to be born" and "needing to be born", respectively) are more or less appropriate (NB: the modal meaning "needing" is ...
user avatar
  • 6,574
3 votes

How do I use gerundives of obligation for deponent verbs?

@brianpck is right, but it's worth adding that in the example quoted, "Sentio, iudices, moderandum mihi esse iam orationi meae fugiendamque vestram satietatem", Cicero had no choice about ...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible