New answers tagged

0

Diēs was originally an irregular member of the fourth declension: in Old Latin the nom. was diūs. But the irregular acc. diēm tended to generate a new nominative by analogy, and the noun was pulled into the emerging fifth declension while keeping its gender. These 12 or so nouns don't represent any identifiable group of PIE nouns, but slowly became more ...


8

Smyth's Greek Grammar, paragraph 232, gives a (probably incomplete) list. (Some of these words aren't used in Homer, and one -- νόσος / νοῦσος "illness" -- is spelled differently in Homer's Ionic dialect.) Of this list, ὁδός, νῆσος, and νόσος are the most frequent (I'd guess these are the three exceptions in your Homer textbook). Feminines. – a. See ...


4

There are three different sorts of nouns to worry about here! The simplest, and most common, are gendered nouns. These have one form for the masculine, and a different form for the feminine; they're extremely common, since most adjectives work this way, and adjectives can be used freely as nouns. For example, a beautiful man is καλός, while a beautiful ...


3

ὁ παῖς and ἡ παῖς are nouns, but ὁ μαθηματικός (ἀνήρ) and ἡ μαθηματική (γυνή) are adjectives for obvious (omitted) nouns. Mathematics was barely a profession then, so my gut says they would skip ἀνήρ as obvious, but perhaps not γυνή; the LSJ dictionary indicates μαθηματική (ἐπιστήμη) may suggest mathematics, alongside the neutral τὰ μαθηματικά (πράγματα). ...


Top 50 recent answers are included