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54 votes

Feminine case 3rd-person version of “Veni, vidi, vici”

"Veni vidi vici" means "I came, I saw, I conquered." "Venit vidit vicit" means "He/she/it came, he/she/it saw, he/she/it conquered." It doesn't make any ...
Nickimite's user avatar
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21 votes

Feminine case 3rd-person version of “Veni, vidi, vici”

It's: Vēnit, vīdit, vīcit. whether the subject is masculine, feminine, or neuter. Latin only has grammatical gender agreement between nouns and the adjectives that modify them. Subject-verb ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
16 votes

"Et tu, Brute?"

Suetonius, in his work Vita Divi Iuli, reports the last words of Caesar being Greek καὶ σὺ τέκνον; which is the original source of Shakespeare's line, translated into Latin fairly literally: the ...
Wtrmute's user avatar
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11 votes

How to translate the phrase "perfacile factu esse"?

Your translation "he proved to them that completing these efforts was done very easily" is good. To express such things in Latin the supine is a good choice. The supine ablative (like factu) is an ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
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Origin and actual quote of the proverb "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion"

Welcome, Leonardo, to the Latin Stack Exchange. The quote you asked for is found in Latin in Suetonius's Life of Julius Caesar, §74, 2: in Publium Clodium Pompeiae uxoris suae adulterum atque eadem ...
Jonathan Hadfield's user avatar
9 votes
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How to translate the phrase "perfacile factu esse"?

Perfacile factu means "easy to do." Factu is a supine, and this construction—supines coming off of certain adjectives—is pretty much where you will always see its ablative form. Other common ...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes

Translation of a Line from Caesar's De Bello Gallico

You have the vocabulary, but there's one small piece of grammar that you need. Nactus is the perfect "passive" participle of nanciscor, meaning "get, obtain, receive." However, we need to recall that ...
brianpck's user avatar
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8 votes

How to say They came, they saw, they conquered in Latin?

If you want to sound archaic or poetic, say "Venere, videre, vicere.". If you do not, say "Venerunt, viderunt, vicerunt.". Latin, namely, has two endings for perfect 3rd person ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
8 votes

Infinitive with “cum”

This is cum = com "with", rather than cum = quom "when". As such, it takes a noun in the ablative (proximis civitatibus) rather than a verb in the subjunctive. All the verbs in ...
Draconis's user avatar
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8 votes
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Grammar of rogatum auxilium, askee modified instead of asker

The word rogatum is the accusative form of the supine. The supine is a verbal noun (like an infinitive1) rather than a verbal adjective (like a participle), so it need not agree with any other word in ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Is there a difference in meaning between "reliquiis in locis" and "alibi"?

The difference is the same as the difference between "elsewhere" and "in other places" in English. Latin is a language, it has multiple ways to express a given concept. Single-...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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7 votes

Grammatical structure of "Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit"

Absolute means "syntactically unconnected to the rest of the sentence except as an adverbial adjunct to the praedicate". The real issue here is, I believe, not whether the ablative is ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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6 votes

Translation of a Line from Caesar's De Bello Gallico 5.29

This is part of an accusativus cum infinitivo, indirect speech depending on a previous finite verb. What makes it difficult to translate is the direct question converted into an a.c.i. Your ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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6 votes
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On Julius Caesar and salmon

The derivation from salire is probably a folk etymology, especially since it does not explain the second syllable of salmo. Walde, Latein. Etym. Wb., says that salmo, and also salar “trout”, are ...
fdb's user avatar
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6 votes
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Ambiguities in De Bello Gallico 1.3.3

This sentence depends a bit on context. Nothing grammatically precludes Orgetorix from being the subject of occuparet, but if he were then the sua in ciuitate sua would have to refer to Orgeterix, too....
Sean Redmond's user avatar
5 votes

"Et tu, Brute?"

It has already been pointed out that Suetonius reported the words "καὶ σύ, τέκνον" as Caesar's last, and that these are the ultimate origin of Shakespeare's "Et tu, Brute?" (though ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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5 votes
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What are some great passages from Caesar?

The opening of BG I is a good place to begin. BG V.12 has his description of the inhabitants and V.13 the geography of Britain. BG VII.6 is news of the Gallic uprising and Caesar's decision to return. ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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5 votes

Ambiguities in De Bello Gallico 1.3.3

I would add that persuadeo often takes a dative and ut (or ne) + subjunctive. "I persuade the dative to do (or not do) the subjunctive." Since Castico is in the dative right behind persuadet and ...
proxpero's user avatar
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5 votes

Does "Ob Eam Causam" introduce an indirect question

The sentence structure is "Cotta, qui cogitasset ... atque ... non fuisset, ... deerat..." The verbs are subjunctive because the relative clause is explaining the cause of the upcoming main ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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5 votes

Grammatical structure of "Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit"

Does this sentence have an ablative absolute that connects grammatically to the rest of the sentence? As Joonas has already pointed out, this question can be answered/interpreted in different ways. ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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5 votes
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Translation of "Qua de causa"

In Latin, unlike English, you can start a sentence with a relative pronoun that refers to the whole previous sentence or thought. A more natural translation than "which" is "that" ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Why is "cum" used in this sentence from "De Bello Gallico"?

It's a temporal cum clause. See section 545 in Allen and Greenough. longius bidui...aberant cum ... cognoscunt. ("they where not farther away than two days journey... when they noticed that ...) ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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4 votes

Greek "datives of agent" in Latin classical prose?

This is indeed found in Cicero: Sic dissimillimis bestiolis communiter cibus quaeritur (Nat. Deor. 2.123) Gildersleeve and Lodge mention that it's more frequently found in Tacitus, so that might be ...
cmw's user avatar
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4 votes

Grammatical structure of "Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit"

Does this sentence have an ablative absolute that connects grammatically to the rest of the sentence? I think it depends on what you mean by connecting grammatically. It is clear that hos means ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What surviving sources describe the civil war between Caesar and Pompeius?

We shouldn't trust Lucan's Pharsalia for history, as it is decidedly not so. Besides being far removed (by almost a century!), Lucan had a clear ax to grind: Though the poem covered historical ...
cmw's user avatar
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4 votes

What surviving sources describe the civil war between Caesar and Pompeius?

"Bellum Civile" by Appian. "De Vita Caesarum" by Suetonius contains parts about Caesar (and the civil war).
Quacksilber's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between emere and coemere?

Emere would indeed be possible, but the prefix co- adds a flavor which suits this situation well. It is not intensified, but rather toned. I might translate coemere as "to collect by buying" or "to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is the coordinating conjunction necessary in a parallel series of terms?

As commenters have pointed out, adding an "and" between the last two elements in a list is not required in Latin. In fact, I have been instructed that it is stylistically preferred to leave such ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Grammar of rogatum auxilium, askee modified instead of asker

Joonas is right that this is a supine (one that is common in Caesar and other authors), but I also want to clarify one further point in your question. Rogatum cannot go with legatos because even if it ...
cmw's user avatar
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4 votes
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Translation Problems in "de Bello Alexandrino"

Only Questions (iii) - navibus constratis , (iv) - Why is there no demonstrative pronoun) will be dealt in this answer, but, first, lets explain the translation itself. while, at the same time, to ...
d_e's user avatar
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