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11 votes
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Is urgolius a Latin word, as this Wiktionnaire etymology seems to imply?

romanisé en *urgolius, qui a remplacé le latin classique superbia The asterisk before the word is a universally accepted indication that the word has not been attested, which means it was not found ...
kkm mistrusts SE's user avatar
7 votes

How did the Latin past participle suffix -atus develop into modern French -é?

There is a regular sound change by which Latin a (long or short), when stressed and in an open syllable, became [e] or [ε]. A few examples out of many: mare > mer amāre > aimer nāsum > nez The past ...
TKR's user avatar
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7 votes
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French and Latin "s'il te/vous plaît"

Plaire (à) has many connotations, some of which overlap with the Latin meanings of placere – to please/be pleasing (to), to enjoy, to be acceptable (to), to like/be liked (by), to be agreeable (to). ...
Penelope's user avatar
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6 votes
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Questions for Regulus

I'll address each question in order: Translation of "pencil" Regarding the translation of "pencil" (French: "crayon"), the word is graphis, -idis, which is a Latinization ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
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Did 'apricus' undergo antiphrasis?

According to this etymological dictionary of the cognate Spanish abrigar, the meaning of "to protect against the wind" was already attested in 4th century AD Latin. ABRIGAR, del lat. APRĪCARE '...
ukemi's user avatar
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6 votes

En Marche ! in Latin

My simple suggestion: Prōrsum! (Forwards!) No Latin phrase will be able to capture the French "en marche" perfectly — unless you are overly verbose, but that dilutes the slogan. I'm not ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

French and Latin "s'il te/vous plaît"

The French verb plaîre is not the DIRECT continuation of placēre, but seems to imply a parallel form *placĕre, or else (as others argue) it derives from the infinitive plaisir, which implies *placīre. ...
fdb's user avatar
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6 votes
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When I am the subject and the direct object of a phrase

Since your central question seems to be about the general case ("How do I translate reflexive first person"), here is a more general answer that builds on the above suggestions: A simple me is all ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
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What semantic notions underlie the Latin 'tropus' with the notion of <find>?

According to Wiktionnaire, the Vulgar Latin verb tropare could mean not only interpreting a song, but also composing a song or poem. The association of the word with songs remains in words like ...
Gilles 'SO- stop being evil''s user avatar
5 votes

En Marche ! in Latin

How you would translate it also depends on which possible context of the phrase you want to capture. Is it more like "we should be marching!", or "we will succeed by/in marching forward&...
Cerberus's user avatar
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5 votes

French and Latin "s'il te/vous plaît"

We can find the many meanings of s'il te plaît in the Littré above the article PLAIRE. They are: Vouloir, trouver bon E.g.: Heureux, si vous voulez, malheureux, s'il vous plaît (in Tartuffe by ...
Luc's user avatar
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5 votes

French and Latin "s'il te/vous plaît"

The Latin verb placere is certainly used as you suggest, but I think that its use tends to be formal rather than familiar (for instance, the Senate would be asked if it "pleased" to accept a ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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5 votes
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What is the Latin etymon of 'que' in the French « ne ... que »?

It would seem logical to me if it came from quam. The Trésor de la langue française does not explain its exact origin, but it does give the meaning of ne ... que as "ne ... rien d'autre que". And ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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5 votes
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What is this character saying in Latin?

It sounds like bonum vinum laetificat cor hominis, with a French accent. "Good wine cheers a man's heart." It's not an uncommon phrase, inspired by Ecclesiasticus 40:20 (part of the ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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5 votes

Questions for Regulus

[1] For graphida, you would have had to recognize the classic 3rd declension ending -is, -idis, which is common among words of Greek origin. That makes the word in question graphis, which can mean a ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes
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What is the equivalent of "Making someone feel he is indebted" in Greek?

As @Hugh said, To "obligate" in Modern Greek is υποχρεώνω, Ancient ὑποχρεόω < ὑπόχρεως. In Modern Greek the verb has come to mean pretty much "to force someone to do something", ...
Nick Nicholas's user avatar
5 votes
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Philip III of France in Latin

Animosus (courageous, spirited, undaunted) is certainly not totally off-base and can be a fine translation for “bold.” For “le hardi” it seems a bit vague; more specific would be audax (daring, ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

How to latinise the French first name Giraud?

The latin form of Giraudus seems to be well attested in older and modern use, e.g.: Joseph Donatus Giraudus Cuneensis ad sacræ facultatis pro-doctoratum... Cultures of Power, page 121 GIRALDUS de ...
gts's user avatar
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4 votes

What underlying semantic notions connect 'studere' to 'to put in, put aside, spare, keep'?

The TLFi has this: Étymol. et Hist. Ca 1170 garder en estui « entreposer » (Rois, éd. E. R. Curtius, p. 148). Déverbal de l'a. fr. estuier, estoiier « conserver, garder » attesté dep. le xiies. (...
Jasper May's user avatar
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4 votes

When I am the subject and the direct object of a phrase

The shortest that I can think of is Aliquando a me dissentio, 'sometimes I disagree with myself.'
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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3 votes

When I am the subject and the direct object of a phrase

I suggest this: Non semper mihi ipsi consentio. I do not always agree with myself. You could also use assentio(r) instead of consentio. To compare the two, you can check an online Latin ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

What semantic notions underlie the Latin 'quartus' & the French « écarter »?

When you quarter something, you divide it into four, so that you have four separate parts. This notion of separation is what developed into the sense of enclosure or separation or removal. That's why ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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3 votes

What underlying semantic notions connect the Latin for '(from then) to this hour' to the French « encore »?

In Czech, we have the word "ještě" with the same three primary meanings: 1) (not) yet (ještě tu není - il n'est pas encore ici - he is still not here) 2) again (ještě jednou - encore une ...
Eleshar's user avatar
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3 votes

How does the Latin of these two translations of The Little Prince compare?

Regarding the issue of repetition of intellegit in your third point: There are several terms in Rhetoric for word repetition known to the ancients; the most general is Anaphora. Epizeuxis refers to ...
Des Coutinho's user avatar
2 votes
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What semantic notions underlie 'hole' and a swelling, bulge'?

My guess would be, Wiktionary is flat-out wrong. The only source for that statement is a century and a half old and, while I don't have access to it to check, the connection between torus and traugus ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes

What semantic notions connect 'fold' with 'plight' = predicament?

The answer is given, in plain and simple words, in the second paragraph of the quotation from Etymonline in the question itself. The semantic expansion happened in English. When taken together, this; ...
kkm mistrusts SE's user avatar
2 votes
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What semantic notions connect 'fold' with 'plight' = predicament?

In English, events unfold. In Italian, gli eventi prendono una piega, i.e. they get a fold (usually una brutta piega, a bad one, but that’s how the world goes...) The same thing is referenced by two ...
Dario's user avatar
  • 3,246
1 vote

How might've *batare originated imitatively?

What is batare doing here anyway? It appears to be modern (i.e. 1100) Latin derived from a Gallic verb. batare ME Latin, Dufresne DuCange vol.1 p620 from Gallic battre: Percutere, verberare; ...
Hugh's user avatar
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