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8

Some of the reasons after the fall of the Western Roman Empire, contact between various regions slowed down and lost a lot of its importance; thus the strongest reason to maintain the unity of the language ceased to work also, at the same time Roman bureaucracy ceased to require correct Latin when there are no strong reasons to keep a language united, ...


7

romanisé en *urgolius, qui a remplacé le latin classique superbia The asterisk before the word is a universally accepted indication that the word has not been attested, which means it was not found in documents, but rather linguistically reconstructed from daughter languages (or sometimes a single language) only. It's not therefore surprising that your ...


7

There is a regular sound change by which Latin a (long or short), when stressed and in an open syllable, became [e] or [ε]. A few examples out of many: mare > mer amāre > aimer nāsum > nez The past participle suffix is simply another case of this change: -ātum > -é. (It's conventional to cite Latin nouns in the accusative when talking about Romance changes ...


7

Plaire (à) has many connotations, some of which overlap with the Latin meanings of placere – to please/be pleasing (to), to enjoy, to be acceptable (to), to like/be liked (by), to be agreeable (to). There is perhaps also some overlap with the formulaic constructions such as si tibi placet/God willing (OLD) and plût à Dieu /may it please God or ce qu’à Dieu ...


6

Since your central question seems to be about the general case ("How do I translate reflexive first person"), here is a more general answer that builds on the above suggestions: A simple me is all that is necessary, but there are ways to emphasize the reflexive pronoun if you wish. One way, given by Joonas, is to use ipse. You can append ipsum after me: ...


6

My simple suggestion: Prōrsum! (Forwards!) No Latin phrase will be able to capture the French "en marche" perfectly — unless you are overly verbose, but that dilutes the slogan. I'm not sure this is a good match (French is my sixth best language…), but let me still try to reason why it might work. The original French phrase is not a verb ...


6

According to Wiktionnaire, the Vulgar Latin verb tropare could mean not only interpreting a song, but also composing a song or poem. The association of the word with songs remains in words like troubadour. From there, it generalized to inventing something, then to discovering something. “Interpreting language variation and change” by Kevin Tuite, collected ...


6

It would seem logical to me if it came from quam. The Trésor de la langue française does not explain its exact origin, but it does give the meaning of ne ... que as "ne ... rien d'autre que". And other than is often expressed as aliud quam in Latin. The Tlf groups ne ... que under that subsense of que which is a conjunction of comparison, like plus que, ...


6

The French verb plaîre is not the DIRECT continuation of placēre, but seems to imply a parallel form *placĕre, or else (as others argue) it derives from the infinitive plaisir, which implies *placīre. Moreover, s'il vus plaist does not seem to be attested until the mid-twelfth century, which again argues against seeing it as a direct continuation of Latin si ...


6

According to this etymological dictionary of the cognate Spanish abrigar, the meaning of "to protect against the wind" was already attested in 4th century AD Latin. ABRIGAR, del lat. APRĪCARE 'calentar con el calor del sol', I.a doc.: Berceo. La ac. 'proteger contra el viento' ya se halla en en el latín de Paladio (S. IV d. C.: Cabrera). Cuervo, Dicc....


5

How you would translate it also depends on which possible context of the phrase you want to capture. Is it more like "we should be marching!", or "we will succeed by/in marching forward"? I would be inclined towards a simple adhorative: Progrediamur! This is best translated as "let us go forward!". It is a present subjunctive used in its adhortative ...


5

As @Hugh said, To "obligate" in Modern Greek is υποχρεώνω, Ancient ὑποχρεόω < ὑπόχρεως. In Modern Greek the verb has come to mean pretty much "to force someone to do something", but the notion of indebtedness is still there: με υποχρεώνεις is still used in the sense of "I am in your debt, I feel obliged to you". So semantically, this is exactly what OP is ...


5

The Latin verb placere is certainly used as you suggest, but I think that its use tends to be formal rather than familiar (for instance, the Senate would be asked if it "pleased" to accept a proposition, and so on). This may tend to distance the use of si tibi placet, etc,. from the French s'il te plaît. As you know, there are several nuances of the English ...


5

We can find the many meanings of s'il te plaît in the Littré above the article PLAIRE. They are: Vouloir, trouver bon E.g.: Heureux, si vous voulez, malheureux, s'il vous plaît (in Tartuffe by Molière) S'il vous plaît, terme de politesse, pour demander quelque chose à quelqu'un. E.g.: Ne m'oubliez jamais dans vos prières, s'il vous plaît (in a ...


4

When you quarter something, you divide it into four, so that you have four separate parts. This notion of separation is what developed into the sense of enclosure or separation or removal. That's why most languages have a word like quarter, quartier, kwartier, Viertel meaning "a fourth part, a separate part of the city, a quartered-off neighbourhood". That ...


4

The shortest that I can think of is Aliquando a me dissentio, 'sometimes I disagree with myself.'


3

I suggest this: Non semper mihi ipsi consentio. I do not always agree with myself. You could also use assentio(r) instead of consentio. To compare the two, you can check an online Latin dictionary of your preference. In cases like this I would use me ipsum / mihi ipsi / … (depending on the needed case) for "myself".


3

In Czech, we have the word "ještě" with the same three primary meanings: 1) (not) yet (ještě tu není - il n'est pas encore ici - he is still not here) 2) again (ještě jednou - encore une fois - one more time) 3) even more (je ještě větší - il est encore plus grand - he is even taller) The underlying meaning is some sort of continuation - "...


3

Regarding the issue of repetition of intellegit in your third point: There are several terms in Rhetoric for word repetition known to the ancients; the most general is Anaphora. Epizeuxis refers to single word repetition for emphasis, as in, "Listen, friends, Listen." Epanadiplosis is when the repeated word bookends a phrase tying off the point you are ...


3

My guess would be, Wiktionary is flat-out wrong. The only source for that statement is a century and a half old and, while I don't have access to it to check, the connection between torus and traugus seems tenuous (both phonologically and semantically). fdb's source, from CNRTL, has a much more plausible explanation (please pardon my translation, I'm very ...


2

Using the example from Wiktionary: Même les rois doivent mourir = Even kings must die = Kings must die, the same way as everyone else Or perhaps even "Kings must die the same", but this is too close to the boundaries of my syntactical comfort zone in English for me to make strong claims. These two English translations (the first one from Wiktionary, ...


2

In English, events unfold. In Italian, gli eventi prendono una piega, i.e. they get a fold (usually una brutta piega, a bad one, but that’s how the world goes...) The same thing is referenced by two opposite metaphors. Note that for specific persons or processes we have an almost exact English equivalent: ha preso una brutta piega is a possible traslation ...


1

What is batare doing here anyway? It appears to be modern (i.e. 1100) Latin derived from a Gallic verb. batare ME Latin, Dufresne DuCange vol.1 p620 from Gallic battre: Percutere, verberare; Dufresne DuCange then quotes the only occurrence of batare. Here is the hapaxlegomenon from which the meaning has to be conjectured. The aforementioned ...


1

Building on Cerberus' answer above, I think the semantic link might be tied to the development of quartus --> quartier: a piece of land; a neighbourhood; lodgings, accommodation; an encampment of troops (see "quartier") If the é- does denote a Latin e(x)- then perhaps we could understand écarter to mean "out of the neighbourhood/lodgings/encampment" and ...


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