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11

There are three major holidays that come to mind when considering "eve": Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve, and Halloween (All Hallows' Eve). When one looks up those holidays in the Morgan and Silva Furman University Lexicon, you get the following: Christmas Eve = pervigilium Natalis Christi New Year's Eve = perviligium anni novi Halloween = ...


11

Frigidus / cold can be used metaphorically to describe any kind of speech that seems flat and lifeless, whether it was an attempt at humour or not. But here we see it being applied specifically to bad jokes: Haec aut frigida sunt, aut tum salsa, cum aliud est exspectatum. These [jokes] either fall flat, or are funny only when something else was ...


10

Scilicet .2. ironically As much space in Smiths is given to the ironical use 'forsooth,' 'you may be sure,' as to the simple emphatic particle. When used in this sense Sc. is sometimes placed first and immediately followed by the object of derision/ suspicion. Scilicet is omnino talia curat. He really cares about such things. (meaning he doesn't) ...


9

Familiaris does indeed indicate a deeper, more intimate level of friendship. Pliny the Younger often uses it thus. In fact, the letters of Pliny offer a wealth of evidence relevant to this topic (therefore, he'll figure quite prominently in this answer). In the following sentence from letter 4.17, he distinguishes regular friendship (amicitia) from ...


8

I like the suggested emendation of Vergil's phrase. Another suggestion comes from the Preface of the Requiem Mass (text available here): Vita mutatur non tollitur, which literally means: "Life is changed, not taken away." The context is religious but I think could be applied more broadly. Vere dignum et justum est, aequum et salutare, nos tibi semper et ...


7

Let us start with the famous omnia vincit amor, "love conquers/wins all". This is close to the original intention if we replace love with life: omnia vincit vita. The word order omnia vincit vita makes the connection to the love phrase clear. Vergilius used hexameter, and for that vita omnia vincit is more convenient — although both are possible. ...


6

Although the English word 'eve' is often used poetically for 'evening', it is in fact fairly common and far more usually means 'the [whole] day before'; I suspect that its use to mean 'vigil', or something similar, is now almost wholly archaic — or, at most, confined to religious occasions. In newspapers we might (seasonally!) read of what the Queen did on ...


6

Following Cic. de orat. 2,218, I would think about two words describing this particular verborum lusus for which you are asking for: cum duo genera sint facetiarum, alterum aequabiliter in omni sermone fusum, alterum peracutum et breve, illa a veteribus superior cavillatio, haec altera dicacitas nominata est. The first word, cavillatio (from cavilla [or ...


5

I'd say cōnectere is the verb you're looking for: I.to tie, bind, fasten, or join together, to connect, entwine, link together (class.; most freq. in part. pass. and the trop. signif.); constr. with cum, inter se, the dat., or absol. Additionally, to connect with is often a synonym for to network in English. There's modern usage precedent, too. The ...


4

FWIW, the verb consumo, can be used with amounts of time as meaning to spend: horasque multas saepe suavissimo sermone consumeres (Cic. Fam. 11.27.5) Hence a possibility is to say you spent two hours: horas duas consumpsi id faciens


4

I am trying to find more examples, but for the present I can add one to the exhibit. It is likely that this is not an established idiom. From Plauti Fragmenta: Quasi lupus ab armis valeo. The footnote of the above edition glosses this irregular use of ab as specifying how the speaker is strong, i.e. "I am as strong as a wolf in my shoulders." (N.B. ...


3

A delectus, -us (also: dilectus) usually refers to a kind of choosing or military levy: Ibi cognoscit de Clodii caede [de] senatusque consulto certior factus, ut omnes iuniores Italiae coniurarent, delectum tota provincia habere instituit. (Caes. Gal. 7.1) There he receives intelligence of the death of Clodius; and, being informed of the decree of ...


3

I think a great word for this is contexere, meaning to weave or connect intricately, like the action of braiding. It establishes a meaning that I think is closer to networking. I'd be fine with conectere, though.


3

Instruo is perfectly all right. An alternative is orno, or a derivative (exorno, adorno), similar in meaning to instruo, 'to fit out or 'equip', though it lacks the latter's notion of 'set in order'. Cicero (Verr. II, 2, 84) has . . . . angebatur animi necessario quod domum eius exornatam et instructam . . . ., which is a bit like 'having your cake and ...


3

*EDIT: Please see my comments below to clarify what I see as the difference between small-e eve and capital-E Eve. For what it's worth, I think both answers above (those of Sam K and Tom Cotton respectively) are correct depending on what kind of "night before" you mean. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, eve is indeed a derivation of evening. ...


2

In the UK, there is just one word for what you describe, and it's 'carer'. It is used indiscriminately for anyone looking after someone in difficulty, whether physical, mental or sometimes even financial. I have seldom, if ever, seen 'caregiver' actually used, either in this sort of context or any other. There doesn't seem to be a real alternative to ...


2

I should think that the English 'facilitate' is close to what you are looking for, but I can't find a simple verb for it. I hope that what follows is helpful. Smith (under 'facilitate) suggests facilius reddo, 'make easier', then gives three different examples, the first two of which are less than completely satisfactory: (Cicero, without reference), ...


2

Vicipaedia, which has very little authority in these matters, uses the obvious choice: Eura. After doing a little digging, I found an old work (warning, large PDF file!) on Finnish metal working: Historica delineatio officinarum ferrariarum in magno principatu Finnlandia which includes several references to Eura, including the below: pg. 33: Hanc ordine ...


1

In order to capture the full feeling of your phrase, I suggest: Vita Superat. It's simple, but it means "life conquers" or more literally "life goes above." It contains the feeling in both English translations you suggest: life wins, and life carries (aka, goes above.)


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