We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

7

This is what the OED has to say on the subject: [On the analogy of forms of expression like ex exsule consul, ‘(that has become) a consul from an exile’, the phrases ex consule, ex magistro equitum, etc. were in the Latin of the empire added as titles to the names of men who had filled the offices of consul, master of the horse, etc. At a later ...


2

The principal meaning of the preposition e / ex is just out of, as the corresponding Greek preposition ἐξ / ἐκ. The great many other different meanings that it has, when joined with words containing specific ideas, follow from a result of the matching. E.g. with the idea of "removing/taking off/empting", the preposition "ex" adds the idea of "completely", ...


2

The Vulgar Latin metipsimus, as a contraction of older metipsissimus, a superlative of metipse, comes from a reanalysis of egomet ipse "me myself" as ego metipse. In Latin, -met was attached to pronouns, but in Vulgar Latin it was reanalyzed as part of ipse instead.


3

Like Draconis stated, it's the weakening of the original word that caused it to be a demonstrative to fill the void that ille and iste left. It's similar to what happened in our language, "the" was originally a demonstrative as well in Old English, but weakened to merely a definite article totally in Middle English. I believe the addition of the meaning "...


4

interficere “to kill” goes with interfieri “to be destroyed” and interdicere “to ban”. Latin inter is cognate with (among others) Old High German untar, English under. This suggests that the descendants of IE *enter (or *H1enter) designate not only “in, between” but also “under, below”. In this case Latin interficere would have a similar semantic as the ...


4

Complex verbs like tr. interficere 'to kill' and intr. interire 'to die' contain the prefix inter-, which some scholars (e.g., López Moreda (1987: page 222), among others) have claimed is related to the suffix *-tero, which can express "a separative function" (cf. Benveniste (1948)). According to López Moreda, i.a., the original meaning of interficere is 'to ...


3

The original latin word for world was 'orbs'. Mundus is a late translation for the greek word 'kosmos'. This greek word conveys the idea of order and order in a greek point of view means the right measure, symetry, harmony and beauty. It was so because the world or the universe was thought in Greece to be that way: orderly constructed, harmonious and ...


1

I will try to translate the reference, and hope for downvotes and corrections if I had anything wrong Original from 2004-2008 Francesco Bonomi - Vocabolario Etimologico della Lingua Italiana anche, anco sembra ad alcuni troncato dal prov. ANCUI (a.fr encui, dial.lomb. encoi) che significo quest'oggi, dal lat. HANC-HODIE; altri lo tratto ...


2

Hanc hodie, literally "this today", is already attested in Plautus's time: the ho- element in hodie (originally a form of hic "this") had gotten semantically bleached until it was no longer emphatic, so an extra form of hic was added to get proper emphasis ("on this day!"). Loss of /h/, similarly, happened very early on: by the first century BCE we have ...


9

I think it could be useful for you to take a look at the following article by Prof. Benjamín García-Hernández. According to him, "inanis has its origins in the negation of the substantive ānus 'surrounding ring', so that inānis has come to mean 'empty', through metonymy from 'without a ring'". See pages 9-11 of the article above (Section 2.1) for more ...


Top 50 recent answers are included