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1

The closest thing to a Latin dictionary along the lines of the OED that I know of is the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae. But it is not finished yet, and not likely to be finished for quite some time.


3

My first response would be "yes, the gender is the same as in Greek", but that rule definitely has exceptions. I wouldn't say that the general topic is very simple: I think that although there is a straightforward equivalence for many words, the words that show change or variation in gender are somewhat complicated to explain. One exception that I know of ...


1

Before answering your question(s), please let me make a couple of general remarks, which I hope can also be useful for other questions you've raised on Latin prefixes/preverbs (I've just seen you raised MANY of them in this site!): (I) It is important to understand Latin preverbs by considering them as forming a SYSTEM (for a nice overview of the system of ...


0

When looking at prefixed verbs like this, it's sometimes helpful to look at the prefixes as separate prepositions. Intendō is prefixed with in, which here indicates a destination or target. Cicero talks about weapons being extended toward Rome as a threat, for example: tela intenta in patriam (D.P.C. 9, line 23 in the Loeb edition). This is how it gained ...


1

As for more recent scholarship on this topic, I recommend you to take a look at the following monograph by G. Haverling, who is THE expert on -sco verbs. HAVERLING, Gerd (2000). On sco-Verbs, Prefixes and Semantic Functions. A Study in the Development of Prefixed and Unprefixed Verbs from Early to Late Latin. Studia Graeca et Latina Gothoburgensia, 64. ...


3

In a comment, Alex B. referred to the 2001 Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue latine by Alfred Ernout and Antoine Meillet, which contains the following passage: Les grammairiens latins voyaient dans ignōscere un composé avec le préfixe privatif in-; cf. la glose ignoscere : non noscere, Loewe, Prodromus 409, et Thes. gloss. emend. s. u. ignōscō. Mais ...


5

While Etymonline isn't particularly reliable (and has a strong aversion to citing any sources), this line almost has it right: The Latin word translates Greek apolambanomene. It's a calqued Greek word, though not the one Etymonline claims. As far as I can determine, Apollonius of Perga is the one who first introduced the term, in his enormous treatise ...


0

This is a question that is well answered by looking at an online Latin dictionary. The noun decimatio is listed as meaning "the taking of a tenth", including the punishment you refer to. This noun is derived from the verb decimare, "to take the tenth" or "to decimate". See the linked entries for more details. This verb appears to come from the ordinal ...


1

Decimo and decimatio always refer to one tenth in Latin. Careful English stylists also use "decimate" in this sense only.


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