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2

The best suffix for -land in Classical Latin is unequivocally -ia. In the vast majority of "lands" take this form: Italia, Hispania, Gallia, Hibernia, Germania, Graecia, Persia, Aegyptia, etc. -landia to the Romans would only have been acceptable if it were a part of the name of the land given by its inhabitants. Should the Romans have met the ...


0

The relevant Latin prefixes are sub- and super-, the first of which becomes sup- before a p. Thus the analogous Latin verb would be superportare. This verb seems not to exist in classical Latin, but there are a number of verbs prefixed with super-, so it is certainly a valid derivation. The analogous English word would then be 'superport', if borrowed ...


19

To elaborate unnecessarily, frāter can securely be traced back to PIE *bʰréh₂tēr, which is a combination of the root *bʰréh₂ + a suffix *-ter (+ the nominative singular ending *-s, which is lost with compensatory lengthening of the *-e- in the suffix, as per Szemerényi's law). That suffix, or at the very least one that looks exactly like it, is also seen in ...


9

It's not quite clear, but more likely ὄργια (and its rarer singular ὄργιον) are unrelated to the family of ὀργή "anger" / ὀργίζω "to anger", and are instead from the root of ἔργον "act, deed" (making them cognate with English work). The argument is based on semantics, since the shift "act" to "ritual act, rite&...


4

I'm abusing the answer space since there is no option in comments for this. The full, finessed, Beekes 2010 dictionary (vI) has I am only including it to display the variants in dialects, which Beekes uses to deadly effect, when it comes to Pre-Greek, his forte. A healing deity is not unexpected to have been inherited from the sophisticated earlier ...


6

Red alert: the name-doctor site is fanciful/crank, full of erroneous folk etymology. So the Λουκᾶς from Λευκός path is basically fraudulent. So I can (only) firmly exclude the Greek connection. For the record, the Greek wikidictionary entry traces the name to Latin. The Hellenistic name is not attested before the 2nd century BC in texts or tombstones; so ...


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