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2

The stem of sāl is săl-. This is documented in many dictionaries, including Lewis and Short. Most derivatives are taken from the stem of the noun, not the nominative. The only outlier with respect to vowel quantity is the singular nominative of the noun. The question should rather be: Why is it long? If we accept the noun (sāl, sălis) as a starting point,...


8

This connections is explained in The Etymologies of Isidore of Seville as follows: A stipulation is a promise or a pledge, whence stipulators are also called promisors. And stipulation (stipulatio) is so called from straw (stipula), for the ancients, when they would promise each other something, would break a straw that they were holding; in joining this ...


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The most likely explanation is that a stalk of wheat was used (perhaps handed over or broken in two) in an ancient ritual upon the making of certain contractual promises.


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Randomly just stumbled upon this over a year old question but here's my take on it: "idoneus" has just always sounded very greek to me, although such word does not exist in greek; at least not a word that has a similar meaning to it. But if we take a look at what De Vaan said, it could be an adj. in -eus to "idon", which DOES exist in ...


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The etymology of ἀρά is unclear. There is an Arcadian inscriptional form καταρϝος which shows that it had a digamma (which actually confuses things further since if so, the Attic form should regularly be ἀρή). Various IE cognates have been proposed; a connection with Lat. ōrō seems not to be widely accepted, but there is a possible Hittite cognate aruwae- ...


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The present active participle of trado is tradens – "handing down" when used adjectively, or "one who hands down" when used as a noun. This leads to English tradent in the same way we get nouns like correspondent or adjectives like incipient.


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That's what Quintilian implicitly said in his Institutio Oratoria (in the 1st century CE), and there's no real reason to doubt him in this case: the fact that the earliest attested plural form (in Plautus' Poenulus, almost three centuries earlier) is avo rather than avēte conforms to it being a Punic loan, and the Punic certainly started with ḥ (/ħ/ rather ...


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It is from the same root as κοπάζω, and also from that of the more common verb κόπτω "hit, strike". Presumably it comes from the latter meaning, so that it originally meant something like "easy to hit" (the prefix εὐ- can mean "easy" as well as "good", as in e.g. εὐδιάβατος "easy to cross"), with a later ...


2

Universal human laziness would have favored dropping the voiceless velar before the voiced dental. Under rapid speech, I don't think the /k/ sound would survive long. You don't always need a universal sound change rule for every change in a language. Some changes are bound to be random or unique. That's the second law of thermodynamics (which takes ...


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