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Another suggestion: Roman history is often colourful and entertaining, and it covers more than a millennium in fields ranging from political and military to architectural and economic. A knowledge of Latin makes this accessible, e.g. the pleasure of reading the gossip of Suetonius or the polished phrasing of Tacitus. An area of Latin which is often ...


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This is just to provide evidence for cōs-cōtis from classical poets: saepe etiam duris errando in cotibus alas (Vergilius, Georgica, 4.203) cote cruenta (Horatius, Carmina 2.8.16) nil tanti est. Ergo fungar vice cotis, acutum (Horatius, Ars Poetica, 304) All of these scan right if and only if cot- is read with a long vowel. These are all the examples of ...


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I use wiktionary for etymology every now and then, and am by no means an expert. Aborior is said to be made from ab and orior: ab (from, away from; outside of; at a distance; completely, thoroughly; absence of; more remote) orior (rise, get up; appear; become visible; born; come to exist; originate) TKR mentions abuse. This may have to do with pushing the ...


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The prefix ab-, in some verbs, can denote abnormality or wrongness, not unlike English mis-: e.g. abutor "misuse, abuse". This seems to be the sense of ab-orior, something like "be misborn" (since orior can be used as a synonym for nascor). L&S actually list aborior in their entry for ab -- scroll down to III.A describing the "...


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The original sense of aborior was probably "die", with "be miscarried/aborted" and "miscarry/abort" as derived sense. Orior originally meant "rise" but took on meanings of "appear" and "be born". The prefix ab- is used here to mark absence or deprivation. I think aborior is comparable to the way ...


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Pronunciation Below you can see the vowel lengths marked by L&S and by OLD. Note that OLD doesn't cover post-Classical vocabulary. (In this table L&S = the online L&S via Perseus; OLD = the 1st edition of the OLD consulted by hand; Gaffiot = the 2016 online edition via Logeion.uchicago.edu.) Vowel in penultimate syllable |---------------------|--...


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