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If taken literally, I can't help you out with a 20 pages syllabus. On a quick websearch, I found Philip Baldi, The Foundations of Latin (2012)-- on gbooks. from page 66 on, Baldi gives an interesting perspective over a couple dozent pages More directly, "Ancient Italy and its Proto-Indo-Eur..." starts pg. 93. For a basic intro, Wikipedia is always a good ...


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The graphs below are taken from "Borrowed Words, A History of Loanwords in English" by Philip Durkin (2014), as suggested by Alex B. Around 13,000 words out of 92,500 (the most frequent entries in the third edition of the OED, OED3) are derived only from Latin with around 2,000 which are from French and/or Latin (uncertain etymology). Interestingly, most ...


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For the path from Latin to Romance you can still not do better than Meyer-Lübke, Romanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch, Heidelberg 1911. The lemmas are the Latin words (or reconstructed Vulgar Latin, marked with *), and give the descendants in all the Romance languages. It is a big book; the best thing is to flip through it at random.


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It sounds like you're looking for two or three different things: an introduction to Latin historical linguistics (i.e. development of Latin from Proto-Indo-European); an introduction to Romance historical linguistics (i.e. development of the Romance languages from Latin); and possibly an introduction to the field of historical linguistics generally (since ...


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Regarding the shift from "folding" to "returning" Sp. Llegar, wiktionary has some interesting comments: "The semantic shift over time from "to fold" is also found in some other Romance cognates, and may be linked to the idea of folding sails when arriving at a port, especially in Iberian Romance where naval tradition was strong. Compare Portuguese chegar; ...


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Does Latin allow the letter k in suffixed words? It doesn't, because Latin doesn't allow the letter K at all. Well, almost; there are a couple of words with K and they mostly have spelling variants with C. In particular, the words you mention are never spelled with a K in Latin. I have never seen K within a Latin word, only at the beginning. (Perhaps there ...


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I take it you're not interested in later words like sultanus, algebra, alcohol or nadir. Then I hope that this article from 1892 isn't too outdated: 'On Semitic Words in Greek and Latin' by W. Muss-Arnolt (https://www.jstor.org/stable/2935792?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents). If you search for "lat." within the pdf, or look in the index at the end, you'll ...


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I just recently stumbled across two examples in Lewis and Short of semitic words, for which L&S cites no Greek intermediary. Of course, the lack of citation itself is not exactly proof that Greek intermediaries do not exist. The two words are manzer from the Hebrew, and mapālia from the Punic, conveniently located adjacent to each other on the page.


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