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-4

Simpler than the above answer, I'd suppose it's from reduplication with gemination. Reduplication as in fefaced marks perfect. Gemination of -n- due to phonetic condition is the same whether from *'ke-, *'kom- or not. capice means to understand on it's own already, so the prefix is not needed to explain those semantics, anyhow. Got it!?


4

As pointed out by brianpck and Shootforthemoon above, there is a general explanation for your apparently specific question on Ancient Greek. To put it in cognitive linguistic terms (e.g., in Lakoff & Johnson's (1980, 1999) famous theory of conceptual metaphors), the explanation of the polysemy involved in your question is explained by the following ...


0

I think the answer is very simple and resides in the same meaning of such preposition as indicating origin and provenience. It literally means "from" and introduces the complement of "moving from", but also all the figurative usages of this complement. Concretely, someone moves from a place to another. - Figuratively, an action moves from [the will of]...


-5

I'll go out on a limb and say they are both wrong. Perhaps not completely wrong, if reinterpretation took place. Consider rex, direct, correct for comparison, especially Ger Gericht "court". I'm clueless about possible origins of initial Chi. Looking up Wiktionary's index it seems only a palatal aspirated voiced velar was regularly possible. Words under ...


-4

As I tried indicate in the previous question before the one that was closed (whereby half of another answer I had started drafting was lost), I doubt it had anything to do with 'folding'. There's the well known meme that folks at all times compare the mind to the current state of the art technology in metaphors, e.g. computers, cog wheels, the steam machine,...


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