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Presumably the basis of this made-up etymology is the fact that the words share a sequence of three letters. But amor comes from the root am- "love" plus the suffix -or, which is a common way to form abstract nouns. It does not contain an element mor that might be compared to mors (and even if it did, that wouldn't get us very far); the only thing shared ...


5

Here is some contextual information I was able to find (not a full answer--I hope the bounty will attract one): What sources say about the dative ending The dative ending -ū is well attested with non-neuter nouns, not just with neuter nouns: An alternative dative ending -ū, which is normal for neuters like cornū 'to the horn', genū 'to the knee', often ...


3

De Vaan's Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages traces tribus to Proto-Indo-European *tri-dʰh₁-u- 'tripartite division' > Proto-Italic *triþu- 'tripartite entity, trinity', and lists tribuere as a derivation, along with tribūnus and tribūtus and a few more obvious ones. He doesn't say it, but PIE *tri- is the zero-grade form of *...


3

This appears to be a mostly or wholly Greek-internal analogical development. It's actually not confined to neuters. Some animates with nom. in -ς show variation between stems without and without -τ-, e.g. γέλως, Homeric acc. γέλω vs. Attic γέλωτα, and similarly for ἔρως, ἱδρώς, χρώς. These are original s-stems (cf. the Latin type honōs) that acquired a stem ...


1

Partire in tria means to divide into three things. This idiomatic use of in, is perhaps the reason it was prefixed to partire to make impertire. When you impart something, you are dividing it into things, whether three things, or two things, or twenty things, for the purpose of divvying it up. If the particular number of things is not what's important, there ...


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