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7 votes
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Ethics of Spinoza: producendam

This kind of metonymy is very common in Latin. For a simple example, vir mortuus is literally "a dead man" but can also mean "the death of a man". This is somewhat similar to how ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
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Ethics of Spinoza - forte ea de causa

The ea (= eā) modifies causa, using the very common adjective–preposition–object of preposition arrangement: 'for this reason.' The forte is from the noun fors, 'chance' (not the adjective fortis, '...
cnread's user avatar
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5 votes
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Ethics of Spinoza – About word order

The pronoun id refers to the event, so you can translate Deo id volente as "when/if/because God wants so/it". The form id is neuter and thus cannot refer to lapis, and it is accusative (...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
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Partitive genitive in Spinoza

Yes, this does indeed appear to be a partitive genitive. Changing the word order as you suggest is legitimate if it helps you. I think it is most useful in its original place where una and sine alia ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
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Ethics of Spinoza - Question about Translation

Literally, '...they do nothing different than if someone... (makes the other conclusion about a circle)' Or, to translate a bit more loosely, '...what they do is no different than what some other ...
cnread's user avatar
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1 vote
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Ethics of Spinoza - eatenus

1 - I don't think Latin makes much of a distinction between substantia est corporea and est substantia corporea. In either case, I think you'll need to rely on context to determine which English ...
Figulus's user avatar
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