20

Yes. We know that Caesar was famous for using a cipher, which is still named for him: Some letters of his to the senate are also preserved, and he seems to have been the first to reduce such documents to pages and the form of a note-book, whereas previously consuls and generals sent their reports written right across the sheet. There are also letters of ...


18

SPD is likely an acronym for Salutem Plurimam Dicit. When used in the phrase [Person X] salutem plurimam dicit [Person Y] it literally becomes Person X sends many greetings to Person Y Person X would be the sender/writer of the letter, and Person Y would be the recipient. For more on Latin letter-writing, see this page.


16

I'll just expand slightly on @HDE226868's excellent and correct answer and say that the literal translation of salutem plurimam dicit is "says very much health." Another version you're likely to see is SQPD, which stands for salutem quam plurimam dicit, or "says as much health as possible." Another set of abbreviations that crops up often is SVBEEV or ...


16

If you have a look at Cicero's letters, many of them do not have any valediction at all. In a pair of letters exchanged between Q. Metellus and Cicero (Cic. Fam. 5.1-5.2), the two men simply stop and end the letter without any closing. However, there were common ways of providing a valediction. One of the most common you can see at the end of Cicero's fifth ...


11

One option worth considering is: Quale est caelum? Literally: "What is the sky/weather/air like?" Aulus Cornelius Celsus writes in De Medicina 3.4: Refert enim qualis morbus sit, quale corpus, quale caelum, quae aetas, quod tempus anni. For it all depends upon the kind of disease, the patient's body, the climate, his age, and the time of year. (...


11

You could say: Qualis tempestas est? This usage appears in Historia Ecclesiae Gandershemensis: …ut audirent [...] qualis tempestas esset …that they might hear how the weather was. However, literally, qualis means what kind of.


11

Yes, it does have an ancient origin. See RFC 5332 (3.6.5): When used in a reply, the field body MAY start with the string "Re: " (an abbreviation of the Latin "in re", meaning "in the matter of") followed by the contents of the "Subject:" field body of the original message. If this is done, only one instance of the ...


8

There are three commonly recognized types of nosism, in which the plural first-person pronoun is used rather than the singular: the pluralis societatis ("social plural"), pluralis modestiae ("plural of modesty"), and pluralis maiestatis ("plural of majesty" or "royal we"). In some sense all of these can be considered specialized uses of the poetic plural, ...


7

There are, plenty. This article contains a very comprehensive reference lists regarding Greek Epistolary research, including references to letters and collections of letters. Unfortunately, you need a subscription to see the full content. I share the key paragraph, with the mentioned references: Texts and Commentaries There are two excellent selective ...


7

There is a collection of Plato’s letters, some, if not all, of which are generally considered to be authentic. There are also the letters of Xenophon, again of contested authenticity. But these both do give us insight into epistolographic conventions of the classical period. From Hellenistic times we have a large number of genuine letters on Egyptian papyri, ...


7

Id agendum est… This is a construction called the gerundive of obligation. Literally, this means "it must be done" or "it should be done"; the "it" here is somewhat generic, and could be translated into English as "things" or "something". (Side note: the plural of agendum is agenda, which was borrowed ...


7

In addition to Nathaniel's excellent answer, we offer this quotation from Ennius: Liber VII Ennii de Naevio sententia: scripsere alii rem 231 Versibus quos olim Faunei vatesque canebant; Cum neque Musarum scopulos quisquam superarat Nec dicti studiosus erat, ante hunc Nos ausi reserare . . . . This appears to be ...


6

It seems to be a case of simple regularization. As L&S point out, abs is rarely used before a word other than te; a Packard search yields only ten such cases vs. 277 of abs te (and two of the ten are tuo, tua). This is the kind of situation in which regularization tends to happen: the special rule "use the variant form abs instead of a if the following ...


6

Would something as simple as Té (vós) summé præstolámur. or Scító (-óte) té (vós) valde exspectátum (-ós). do the trick? (I'm going with your real meaning rather than the specific sentence you asked for.) (Præstolor seems to take the dative or the accusative indiscriminately.)


6

Re was certainly used with the same meaning, as stendarr points out in another answer, but it was not used in the same manner. For example, Cicero did not start his letters with it, although there are examples of him using the word with the meaning "in the matter of." There are many references in ancient texts showing the use of the word res in the ...


5

From Poster, C. 2007. A conversation halved: Epistolary theory in Greco-Roman antiquity. In Letter-writing manuals and instruction from antiquity to the present. Edited by C. Poster and L. C. Mitchell, 21–51. Columbia: Univ. of South Carolina Press pointed by @luchonacho I have found quite a few rules that I'll sum up here for those interested: Letters ...


5

istud vero profecto = but this in fact sic autem in fatis est = but/now as fate would have it // but/now it was fated that // but such was my fate


5

There are plenty of books by various authorities (Balsdon, Nicolet, Cowell, Dupont . . . ) about life at Rome, covering circumstances of almost every kind imaginable, but I can't recall reading anything that deals with this. There are several attested expressions for rejection, putting aside, even divorcing, but I can find no dictionary reference to ...


5

In poems 24 and 25 of book 3 (which some editors see as together comprising one poem), Propertius breaks up with Cynthia. He states this most clearly in this excerpt: quinque tibi potui servire fideliter annos:   ungue meam morso saepe querere fidem. nil moveor lacrimis: ista sum captus ab arte;   semper ab insidiis, Cynthia, flere soles. ...


4

Perhaps this would qualify as a breakup letter. By skipping a couple of lines of the second half of Ovid's Amores 3.9a we get a decent breakup note. The rest of the poem is not addressed to the soon-to-be-ex mistress, so it would not fit the format of a breakup note. Here's the text: Quando ego non fixus lateri patienter adhaesi,     ...


4

FWIW, in societies where people marry young there is almost no courtship or status of "boyfriend and girlfriend", so I assume you also mean a breakup between married/engaged couples? NVG Mt 1,19 uses dimittere as a verb. Mt 5,31 in turn uses repudium to mean divorce as a noun, which I didn't know, seems to be Classic. (I thought it was a hebraism.)


4

I'm in Australia, not the UK, but I've never encountered a GP who uses Latin either. I am, however, an ex-nurse, and I can assure you that while English is considered best practice, some Latin is still used - in notes, on med. charts, and in everyday conversation, mainly because it's such useful shorthand. Two of the most common examples that come to mind ...


3

I have found the answer, and hereby provide a table for everyone’s benefit. Zel =  Zelzer; BnM = Benedictine–Maurist; Bey = Beyenka. Cross-reference table for the enumeration of the letters of Ambrosius (Aurēlius Ambrosius) Michaela Zelzer, Sister Mary Melchior Beyenka, and Benedictine–Maurist numbers compared. Zelzer  BnM Bey Benedictine–Maurist Zel Bey ...


3

SPD can also represent Salutem Plurimam Dat which has the same meaning as those mentioned above.


2

I know this: Si tu vales bene est, ego valeo. Usually written with 1 letter: SVBEEV or STVBEEV. Which means: If you are healthy (well) is good, I am healthy (fine) and is equivalent to Hello.


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