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7 votes

decipher graduation date from diploma

It's 8 days (a.d. viii) before the 1st of June (kal. iun.). In proper Roman counting, that would be the 25th, since Romans practiced inclusive counting. However, there's no guarantee your university ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Is there a Latin equivalent for "FYI" (for your information)?

Ad tuo nuntio is not grammatical, and ad tuum nuntium, the grammatically correct version, doesn't mean "for your information" anyway. The Romans weren't big on acronyms, but one that does ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 53.9k
4 votes

To Latin, what is the gender of an English word?

First and foremost, it depends if you're writing in Latin or English! If you're writing in English, grammatical gender is generally not a concern, even with foreign words—just like we don't decline ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes

How is rego(long) in English a cognate of rogo(long) in Latin?

Regō is not an English word, but a Latin one. English does not use macrons on vowels. The English slang term "rego", short for "registration", ultimately goes back to Latin re-gerō ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66k
3 votes

Why are some English words considered as derivatives of Latin pars, while others as cognates?

For two words to be cognate, they need to share an ancestor at some point. This is a much broader category than one being derived from the other. To use a biological metaphor, your siblings are ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66k
3 votes

Latin translation of "Killing in the name of"

Too long for a comment, so... Comments have indicated that killing is a noun, or rather a gerund. Thus the verb form occidere might not be appropriate. The noun form is occisio. You have also ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
2 votes

Conjugate dīrígere as 1st-person past tense

Dīrigō is a third conjugation verb. The imperfect forms regularly, dīrigēbam, as you can find in any 3rd conjugation table. The perfect is a bit more tricky. Since third conjugation verbs have ...
Rafael's user avatar
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1 vote

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

Many Latin's lovers across the world would like use the Latin in the today's life, but they cannot find Latin names for the things of our time. Answering to your question is not easy. First, we need ...
Marcus's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
Accepted

Latin translation of "Killing in the name of"

Latin doesn't have a preposition "of". To express the genitive, you need to inflect the word. For example, "of Carthago" is Carthaginis and "of stadium" is stadii. You ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

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