Skip to main content
69 votes

Is "history" a male-biased word ("his+story")?

While I'm sure a better-research answer might be able to give you more insight, perhaps a simple response will be a good place to start. As you found, "history" comes from Greek ἱστορία (historia) ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.7k
41 votes
Accepted

Is "history" a male-biased word ("his+story")?

"Herstory" is completely unrelated to the etymology of "history" As others have mentioned, there is no etymological connection between the first part of "history" and the ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
18 votes

Et cetera versus et alia

etc. Et cetera (etc.) uses the neuter plural of ceterus. It literally means "and the other [things]." (N.B. The linked L&S entry mentions that it differs from reliquus because it refers to "...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.7k
14 votes

Is "history" a male-biased word ("his+story")?

'Herstory' is not much more than a nonce-word. It's the sort of thing that used to be quoted by feminists in order to demonstrate how wrongfully the world, even the English language, had been arranged ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.1k
13 votes

Is the usage of "id est" in Latin exactly like the usage of "i.e." or "that is" in English?

In addition to Ily's overview, I'd like to offer a few examples in which the expression is used just as in English: Ennius, Varia 1 (from his translation of Euhemerus' Sacred History) 140: inque ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 20.1k
11 votes
Accepted

Traditional English pronunciation of "dives"?

I agree with your guess of /daɪviːz/. For comparison, the Oxford English Dictionary's entry for miles gloriosus mentions /ˈmaɪliːz/ as a former possible pronunciation of miles, which has the same ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
10 votes

Is "history" a male-biased word ("his+story")?

As said already, history comes from the ancient greek ἱστορία. I am a native Greek, although my studies are not in literature, so I don't have as much info to provide as sumelic, for example. However,...
George Menoutis's user avatar
10 votes

What words in the English language are derived from the latin word "gustus"?

I can't comment on the Spanish, but I can on the Latin. In fact, the word gusto is an English word, and comes, via Italian, from the Latin gustus. From Merriam-Webster: a. an individual or special ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 55.8k
9 votes
Accepted

Etymology of "salarium" and its connection to salt

This book suggests: SALARY, salaire, F. From salarium, L. a stated allowance of provisions given to a soldier, of which (sal) salt was a necessary part; and hence the term came to signify pay ...
luchonacho's user avatar
  • 12.5k
9 votes

Is "history" a male-biased word ("his+story")?

The History of Herstory Robin Morgan coined the neologism in 1970. She was well aware of the etymology of history. As she recalled in her book, The Word of a Woman (emphasis added) [The essay] “...
Davislor's user avatar
  • 231
9 votes

What is the plural of "telos" as used in English?

According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the first known usage of telos was in 1904, which is fairly recent, relatively speaking. The word doesn't appear in any old dictionaries before that time. Most ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

commence < commensa = "joint table"?

This sounds like folk etymology to me. I'm not aware of any word *commensa, and the formation looks odd: prepositional prefixes aren't as common on nouns, and surely "together-table" would ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68k
8 votes

How much larger are Latin texts translated into English?

It may be apposite to say that, for five modern works of varying styles translated into Latin, I turned a total of 295,700 words of English into 212,300 of Latin. This represents a surprisingly ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.1k
8 votes
Accepted

Origin of "seize the day" as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

I have looked into this some more and think I can now give a precise answer to the question. The earliest published translation of Horace 1,11 to render “carpe diem” as “seize the day” is in THE WORKS ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k
8 votes
Accepted

What is the etymology of the Latin name of Cambridge?

It is a 17th-century Latinisation of the Anglo-Saxon name for the town: "The term is derived from Cantabrigia, a medieval Latin name for Cambridge invented on the basis of the Anglo-Saxon name ...
Penelope's user avatar
  • 8,711
8 votes

How did I misunderstand the Latin 'consisto' in interpreting 'X consists in Y'?

Phrasal verbs First, here is an important difference between Latin and English syntax. In English, a preposition often combines with a verb to change its meaning. For example, "I picked up the ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
8 votes

Does "Op. cit." stand for "opus citatum" or "opere citato"?

Both, or either! Opus citātum and opere citātō are different inflections of the same phrase, depending how they're used in the sentence. If something comes from the cited work, for example, that ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68k
8 votes
Accepted

Does "Op. cit." stand for "opus citatum" or "opere citato"?

It depends on context, I would say. Opere citato would mean "from the cited work" or "in the cited work" in the most relevant contexts. Opus citatum would mean "the cited work&...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 20.1k
8 votes

What is the plural of "telos" as used in English?

Telea (τέλεα) is a valid Greek plural (not contracted), and it looks better in English: the -a plural is not unusual for Greek (and Latin) borrowings, and the uncontracted -e- is similar to the ...
b a's user avatar
  • 1,332
8 votes

How do you translate "deeds, not words" into Latin?

Facta, non verba IS the motto you're looking for. It actually is a common motto (lists of examples: 1, 2) Its grammar is perfectly fine, as already said. It seemingly showed up as a Latinism in ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
7 votes
Accepted

How to Say "only as long as" in Latin?

Your approach isn't entirely wrong (well, if we gloss over the non-existing form rego); however, quamdiu stands with the indicative I believe that sharing a verb between the main clause and the ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
7 votes

decipher graduation date from diploma

It's 8 days (a.d. viii) before the 1st of June (kal. iun.). In proper Roman counting, that would be the 25th, since Romans practiced inclusive counting. However, there's no guarantee your university ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 55.8k
7 votes

Have these Greek letters been related to these Latin/English letters?

F and Φ: No. F descends from Greek digamma, a letter that originally represented /w/, which died out in the Greek alphabet shortly after /w/ did. You can still see relics of it in the number system. H ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68k
6 votes
Accepted

Audio and video... and tango?

The Oxford English Dictionary indicates that the O in audio, video and radio comes from the O found in Greek compounds, which was used in scientific vocabulary built from Latin and Greek roots: e.g. ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.5k
6 votes
Accepted

Etymology of ambulance

According to this XIX century book (a period when ambulances were still driven by horses): So it might be related to the fact that ambulances were going around by walking (of horses). It seems, ...
luchonacho's user avatar
  • 12.5k
6 votes

Is "Stanford populi" bad Latin?

You are right, this is terrible Latin. They could have said: "we now have a populus of 215,000 ongoing students". If it really has to be Latin, that is.
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k
6 votes

How to Say "only as long as" in Latin?

Hoc auxilium regis tantum permanere poterat dummodo rex ipse in regno [imperio, potestate] permaneret. There’s an implied condition in this “as long as” construction: the help lasts only if the king ...
Patricius's user avatar
  • 541
5 votes
Accepted

General term for each inflected form of a lexeme

I would simply say: "Illi is an inflected form of ille. Illi is the singular dative masculine form of ille." (I am not sure what the role of "declension" in your example is. I found it more natural to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes

Origin of "seize the day" as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

Just a brief comment on the verb carpo - here's a screenshot of the entry in the OLD: So, carpo as "seize" is even in the OLD. It makes sense - if time fleets (or runs or flies), you may want to ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 11.7k
5 votes

Is the usage of "id est" in Latin exactly like the usage of "i.e." or "that is" in English?

Not really... I.e. being used to mean "namely" or "to wit" is a very literary construction. Classical Latin was often a written record of oratory or prose written as if it were ...
lly's user avatar
  • 776

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible