12 votes

looking for help with the Latin word for "open"

I think in this case, resero wins, because its primary meaning means "unlock." For aperio, the meanings derive from the action of opening a door or even uncovering an object. The verb ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 54k
6 votes

How to say "bribe" in Latin?

Since you tagged this question as "ecclesiastical," the first option that comes to mind is munus, muneris. Munus is a generic word for a "gift" (or even a "function" or &...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.2k
4 votes

Excelsior Luminis - Making sure this translation is accurate

The spelling is fine, but the grammar not quite ;-) The problem is that luminis is the genetive (“of light”), and you want the ablative lumine to say “than light.” It's a special use of the ablative ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

Does Latin have sentences or just clauses?

Latin definitely has sentences, but sentence division generally has little effect on the grammar, and certainly has no bearing on your troubles with the reflexive pronoun. What is much more important ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

How do I say ''Don't do things halfway.'' in Latin?

Another option, perhaps: dimidium facti parum est. Half of a deed is inadequate/too little/not enough. This is a 'mash-up' of two passages: Horace, Epistulae 1.2.40: dimidium facti, qui coepit, ...
cnread's user avatar
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4 votes

How to say "bribe" in Latin?

In a verbal sense, Classical Latin would probably have used suborno (“I induce/incite/suborn”). For a nominal sense, you could use the deverbal derivation with “-io”, subornatio, (“a subornation”, “an ...
Zwing's user avatar
  • 71
2 votes

Mechanical heart in Latin

This reminds me of the introduction to Hobbes' Leviathan. Though Leviathan was originally published in English in 1651, he produced a revised Latin edition in 1668. Here are the first lines of the ...
brianpck's user avatar
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2 votes

Translate: “If God Is For Me.”

In the Latin Vulgate, that text reads, "si Deus pro nobis quis contra nos". In order to change "us" to "me", we simply need to replace "nobis" with "me&...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,465
2 votes

Translate, “The world with her” into Latin

Orbis cum illa visendus. There are many ways to say this, and I've been running through many of them in my mind, but I haven't found any that are big improvements on this. There are many alternatives ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,579
2 votes

How do I say ''Don't do things halfway.'' in Latin?

Perhaps it is possible to translate literally, but lets examine other options: we can use conata or conatus(4th dec.) or coeptum to denote things started/hoped/attempted, as in Caesar Perfacile factu ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11k
1 vote

What is the correct translation for "For posterity"

Ad perpetuam rei memoriam is a bit of boilerplate that can be found at the beginning of many papal documents. It is commonly translated as "for posterity" in English. As one example, see ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,579
1 vote

Championship = "Pilae" but Pilae = ball, pillar, etc

Definitely don't trust Google Translate here. Pilae literally means "balls", either the kind you use in sports, or anything roughly spherical—e.g. it was used to describe the shape of the ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66k

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